Paths of Glory
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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2004 | 2003

8 items from 2015


On the Hunt: The Films of James B. Harris

8 April 2015 9:46 PM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

CopAt the ripe age of twenty-six—the two were born within days of each other in 1928—James B. Harris and Stanley Kubrick formed Harris-Kubrick Productions. With Kubrick leading the charge behind the camera and Harris acting as the right-hand-man producer, the duo completed three major critical successes: The Killing (1956), Paths of Glory (1957), and Lolita (1962). But where Kubrick’s subsequent work has achieved a supreme, hall-of-fame stature, Harris’s own directorial career—consisting of five excellent movies made across a four-decade span—remains, despite the valiant effort of a few notable English-language critics (Michael Atkinson, Jonathan Rosenbaum), on the relative sidelines. The latest attempt to boost Harris’s reputation: BAMcinématek’s week-long retrospective of Harris’s producing and directing output, selected by “Overdue” co-programmers Nick Pinkerton and Nicolas Rapold.Harris and Kubrick stopped working together amidst a pre-production disagreement during the making of what would become Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb »

- Danny King

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Monicelli Revisited, Part One: Empathy and Sin

6 April 2015 2:45 PM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Anna Magnani in a publicity photo for The Passionate Thief.One thing cinephiles learn fast is just how easy it is, thanks to the limits and whims of distribution, for celebrated films to fade into the background outside their homeland.  So one way to begin with Italian director Mario Monicelli is how overshadowed he is today on the world stage.  You could say, only half-ironically, that he'd be more famous if only more people had heard of him, or if his global reputation kept up with the one he holds in Italy.  Monicelli began filmmaking in the 1930s, was a prolific screenwriter in the 40s, took off as a director in the 50s, and continued making movies without much pause until his death in 2010.  In his heyday as a hitmaker, he worked with stars like Anna Magnani, Marcello Mastroianni, Totò, Claudia Cardinale, and Monica Vitti.  He once shared a Golden »

- Duncan Gray

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Directors' Trademarks: Stanley Kubrick

26 February 2015 5:21 PM, PST | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

At least once a month, Cinelinx will chose one director for an in-depth examination of the “signatures” that they leave behind in their work. This week we’re examining the trademark style and calling signs of Stanley Kubrick as director.

Kubrick’s interest in visual arts began with photography before he became interested in filmmaking. He enjoyed making short films and became very proficient at doing so. Eventually he made his first feature film The Killing Fields (1953) as an exercise in low-budget filmmaking. That film was not a commercial success, and he had to work hard to get funding to keep working as a filmmaker. His next film, Killer’s Kiss (1955) involved a lot of experimentation, so much that it ended up eating into the budget and costing Kubrick a profit. As a result, he decided to work with a professional crew on his next film, The Killing (1956), which also did not become commercially successful, »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (G.S. Perno)

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Examining the Christopher Nolan backlash

23 February 2015 10:33 PM, PST | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Another Oscars season, and Christopher Nolan is overlooked again. With Interstellar getting a mixed reaction, we look at the Nolan backlash.

This article contains a spoiler for the ending of Interstellar.

In case you missed it, the Oscars were this past weekend and Birdman was the big winner. The Academy’s choice to award Alejandro González Iñárritu's fever dream was a genuine shock, with Boyhood the running favourite for many months. Nonetheless, some things never change, and in that vein it's certainly a non-surprise the Academy also hardly noticed the most ambitious blockbuster of 2014: the Christopher Nolan space epic, Interstellar. Indeed, I use the phrase "non-surprise", because how could it be a winner when it was only nominated for the bare minimum of five Oscars in technical categories that are reserved as consolation prizes?

This is by all means par for the course with a film that has »

- simonbrew

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Obsessed with Pop Culture: Best of the Week

7 February 2015 4:14 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Film ‘Jupiter Ascending’ rises to absurd and hilarious heights

That sound you’re hearing is a massive sigh of relief from David Lynch.  He no longer holds the dubious distinction of producing the most expensive B-movie in the history of Hollywood.  That honor now belongs to The Wachowskis, whose Jupiter Ascending has officially displacedDune at the top (or bottom) of the heap.  This isn’t necessarily a bad thing, however.  Jupiter Ascending not only looks spectacular, it’s a laugh riot.  Ridiculous dialogue, hammy performances, and enough mythology to baffle Zeus make this disaster a must-see for all lovers of cheese… read the full article.

The Conversation: Drew Morton and Landon Palmer Discuss ‘The Killing’

Stanley Kubrick’s The Killing (1956) is not my favorite work by the visionary director. In fact, the film probably wouldn’t even make it onto a list of my top five Kubrick films. Yet, with »

- Ricky

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The Conversation: Drew Morton and Landon Palmer Discuss ‘The Killing’

7 February 2015 9:21 AM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

The Conversation is a new feature at Sound on Sight bringing together Drew Morton and Landon Palmer in a passionate debate about cinema new and old. For their second piece, they will discuss Stanley Kubrick’s film The Killing (1956).

Drew’s Take

Stanley Kubrick’s The Killing (1956) is not my favorite work by the visionary director. In fact, the film probably wouldn’t even make it onto a list of my top five Kubrick films. Yet, with a career that included such amazing films as Paths of Glory (1957),Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964),2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), Barry Lyndon (1975), and The Shining (1980), that’s not an indication that The Killing is a film of poor quality but an indication that Kubrick’s body of work comes the closest to cinematic perfection than any director I can think of. Thus, while The Killing »

- Landon Palmer

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Video of the Day: Stanley Kubrick and the Art of the One-Point Perspective

1 February 2015 10:16 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

One-point perspective is a term used to describe a shot composition which the two most characteristic features of perspective are that objects are smaller as their distance from the observer increases; in other words, “the size of an object’s dimensions along the line of sight are relatively shorter than dimensions across the line of sight”. Director Stanley Kubrick was an expert in using the one-point perspective and included this shot in just about all of his films to great effect. On set, Kubrick was said to be a perfectionist who would obsess over every painstaking little detail in order to make sure the shot and actors acted in accordance to his vision. Vimeo user Kogonada put together this beautiful montage showing the prominent single-point perspective in Kubrick’s body of work. Included are scenes from his greatest movies such as Paths of Glory, 2001: A Space Odyssey, The Shining and my personal favourite, »

- Ricky

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Stanley Kubrick, Legendary Director

1 February 2015 5:31 PM, PST | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

The works of Stanley Kubrick have changed film making forever. They have stood the test of time and only become more important and impactful as they age. For these reasons, we honor the legendary director and his most sucessful films.

In each genre of art there are certain individuals whose works transcend the eras of their creation to become something more than just art. These pioneers of culture push the boundaries of their respective crafts to deliver masterpieces that are truly timeless. Often times the true impact of their work is not properly recognized until many years after their work is released. Stanley Kubrick is one of these rare individuals. In the craft of making film, Kubrick was a visionary ahead of his time and on the leading edge of pop culture trends that helped define humanity in the 20th century. His abilities and talents as director, in particular, changed »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (G.S. Perno)

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2004 | 2003

8 items from 2015


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