On the Bowery (1956) - News Poster

(1956)

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Something Wild (1961)

Something Wild

Blu-ray

The Criterion Collection 850

1961 / B&W / 1:66 widescreen 1:37 flat Academy / 113 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date January 17, 2017 / 39.95

Starring: Carroll Baker, Ralph Meeker, Mildred Dunnock, Jean Stapleton, Martin Kosleck, Charles Watts, Clifton James, Doris Roberts, Anita Cooper, Tanya Lopert.

Cinematography: Eugen Schüfftan

Film Editor: Carl Lerner

Original Music: Aaron Copland

Written by Jack Garfein and Alex Karmel from his novel Mary Ann

Produced by George Justin

Directed by Jack Garfein

After writing up an earlier Mod disc release of the 1961 movie Something Wild, I received a brief but welcome email note from its director:

“Dear Glenn Erickson,

Thank you for your profound appreciation of Something Wild.

If possible, I would appreciate if you could send

me a copy of your review by email.

Sincerely yours, Jack Garfein

Somewhere back East (or in London), the Actors Studio legend Jack Garfein had found favor with the review. Although
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Daughter of Dawn

Filmed in the Wichita Mountains of Oklahoma, this silent tale of Native American life has an all-Kiowa and Comanche cast, and is credited as accurately recreating cultural details and costumes. Thought lost for the better part of a century, it was rediscovered just a few years ago. The Daughter of Dawn Blu-ray The Milestone Cinematheque 1920 / B&W (tinted) / 1:33 Silent Ap / 80 min. / Street Date July 19, 2016 / vailable through Mvd Entertainment / 27.96 Starring Esther LeBarre, White Parker, Belo Cozad, Hunting Horse, Wanada Parker. Produced by Richard Banks New Music Score David Yeagley Written by Richard Banks, Norbert Myles Produced by Richard Banks Directed by Norbert Myles

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

"Constancy, thy name is Red Wing!" Ethnographer alert! As one of the go-to destinations for unusual or difficult cinema discoveries, Milestone Films' Dennis Doros and Amy Heller has turned out exceptionally good theatrical and home video restorations of important films like The Exiles,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Fat City

John Huston sets the bar for director-driven quality filmmaking of the early 1970s. Stacy Keach is a punchy boxing bum who teams up with the ambitious newcomer Jeff Bridges; the glowing discovery is the amazing Susan Tyrell, film history's most convincingly caustic floozy-alcoholic, bar none. Her voice can peel paint, but we love her dearly. Fat City Blu-ray Twilight Time Limited Edition 1972 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 100 min. / Street Date September 8, 2015 / available through the Twilight Time Movies / 20.95 Starring Stacy Keach, Jeff Bridges, Susan Tyrrell, Candy Clark, Nicholas Colasanto, Art Aragon, Curtis Cokes, Sixto Rodriguez Cinematography Conrad L. Hall Production Designer Richard Sylbert Film Editor Walter Thompson Original Music Kris Kristofferson, Marvin Hamlisch (supervisor) Written by Leonard Gardner from his novel <Produced by John Huston, Ray Stark Directed by John Huston

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

This rewarding show is a fine opportunity to catch up on two great talents, John Huston and Stacy Keach.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

NYC Weekend Watch: Vittorio de Sica, ‘Chocolat,’ ‘Carlito’s Way,’ ‘Notorious’ & More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

The Film Society at Lincoln Center

A new 35mm print of Claire Denis‘ debut, Chocolat, screens throughout the week.

Film Forum

For a Vittorio de Sica retrospective, see The Bicycle Thief on Friday, Miracle in Milan on Saturday and Sunday, and Mister Max & Marriage Italian Style on Sunday.

A new restoration of Otto Preminger‘s
See full article at The Film Stage »

Toronto Film Review: ‘Mekko’

Toronto Film Review: ‘Mekko’
Something of a next-generation take on the themes in recently rediscovered indie classics “The Exiles” (1961) and “On the Bowery” (1956), Sterlin Harjo’s third narrative feature updates their semi-documentary views of Native American and Skid Row urban culture to latter-day Oklahoma, adding a supernaturally tinged suspense element. This low-key, impressionistic, loosely plotted tale is unlikely to expand much upon the commercial outreach achieved by his similarly angled “Four Sheets to the Wind” and “Barking Water.” Bur for the patient, “Mekko” offers another flavorful if largely downbeat snapshot of Native American life, one that should find favor with festival programmers and niche buyers.

When we first meet fiftysomething Mekko (rodeo pro turned film stuntman Rod Rondeaux), he’s just getting released after 19 years in prison for killing his much-liked artist cousin in a mutually drunken brawl. He’s done the punitive hard time both physically and spiritually. But the relative he visits
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Hotspots: South African Cinema Under Apartheid

  • Keyframe
Come Back, Africa (1959) Filmed secretly, with a small crew and non-professional actors, this is one of the few South African films that truly captures the life of black civilians under apartheid. After his first feature, On the Bowery (1956), American independent filmmaker Lionel Rogosin traveled to South Africa and spent months getting acquainted with the people. . .With its prescient mixture of documentary and fiction, Come Back, Africa does what no other national film dared to do at that time: it gives voice and a presence to blacks, as it tenderly portrays their thoughts, feelings, and culture. >> -Cristina Álvarez López
See full article at Keyframe »

Daily Briefing. Bordwell + Thompson + Criterion, Reverse Shot on Spielberg II, More

  • MUBI
For the tenth edition of Film Art: An Introduction, David Bordwell and Kristin Thompson are partnering with Criterion to present Connect Film, an hour-long set of twenty videos on various aspects of filmmaking addressed in the now-classic textbook. Above: "Elliptical Editing in Vagabond (1985)." Kristin Thompson: "Most of the other Connect examples illustrate the chapters on the four types of film technique: mise-en-scene, cinematography, editing, and sound. There's also a short documentary about digital animation."

More books. You may remember that Dave Kehr is quite an admirer of the writing of Arlene Croce, a dance critic for the New Yorker from 1973 to 1998. She's also the author of The Fred Astaire & Ginger Rogers Book and, in the new issue of the New York Review of Books, she reviews Todd Decker's Music Makes Me: Fred Astaire and Jazz and Kathleen Riley's The Astaires: Fred and Adele. As the Boston Globe's Mark Feeney writes,
See full article at MUBI »

New on DVD and Blu-Ray, February 21: 'Puss in Boots,' 'Tower Heist,' 'J. Edgar'

  • Moviefone
DVD or Blu-ray? Redbox or Netflix? Streaming? Whatever your poison, we've got the highlights and lowlights on the week's new releases -- as well a double-shot of exclusive Clint Eastwood clips from the new release "J. Edgar" and the 20th anniversary Blu-ray of "Unforgiven." Moviefone's Pick of the Week "Puss in Boots"(Friday, February 24) What's It About? Antonio Banderas' fan-favorite feline from the "Shrek' series gets his own movie. With Humpty Dumpty and the mysterious Kitty Softpaws at his side, the swashbuckling cat attempts to steal golden goose eggs from a giant's castle, and creates a whole new set of fractured fairy tale adventures. See It Because: Even if the "Shrek" series has worn thin, "Puss" has enough lively charm to feel like something new; the voice cast plays their parts with a lot of loose, madcap energy and the animation is wonderfully imaginative. Also Available On Redbox
See full article at Moviefone »

Daily Briefing. Cinema of Transgression + Critics on the Move

  • MUBI
You have to be 18 or older to see You Killed Me First, which, according to the Kw Institute of Contemporary Art, is the first exhibition on the Cinema of Transgression. There'll be a talk with Nick Zedd on Tuesday evening, followed by another with Richard Kern on Wednesday. The exhibition's opened this weekend and will be on view through April 9.

Also in Berlin, and starting tomorrow, the Arsenal will be screening a selection of titles from the Forum program at this year's just-wrapped Berlinale. Eleven films over eleven evenings, beginning with the three films by Yuzo Kawashima, The Sun in the Last Days of the Shogunate (1957), Suzaki Paradise: Red Light (1956) and Between Yesterday and Tomorrow (1954), and ending with the two restorations of films by Shirley Clarke, Ornette: Made in America (1984) and The Connection (1961).

Next week, the Arsenal wraps its series of films by Ulrike Ottinger by screening her Berlin Trilogy
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Lionel Rogosin's "Come Back, Africa"

  • MUBI
"The miracle of Lionel Rogosin's apartheid drama Come Back, Africa isn't that it's a solid, affecting artifact of a cruel society, but that it exists at all," begins Bill Weber in Slant. "In the wake of his debut film, the New York skid-row chronicle On the Bowery, Rogosin set out in 1957 for Johannesburg, and for months laid the groundwork for surreptitiously shooting a follow-up that would lay bare the pain and humiliations of black South Africans subjugated by the white majority, enlisting native writers Lewis Nkosi and Bloke Modisane to collaborate on the scenario. Mixing documentary-like footage with scripted scenes as he had in his first feature, the filmmaker heavily features music and dance by throngs of street performers, a diegetically captured salve for the wounds of extreme poverty and social oppression — and an ideal camouflage of his critical agenda from the South African authorities, who were persuaded that
See full article at MUBI »

Movie Posters of the Week: “Come Back, Africa” & “The Turin Horse”

  • MUBI
Two of my favorite new posters right now, for two films opening within the next few weeks in New York, are both designed by one of my favorite designers, Scott Meola. I wrote about Scott’s work before when I featured his poster for On the Bowery back in 2010. Come Back, Africa, which Milestone Film is opening in New York next Friday, was Lionel Rogosin’s follow-up to Bowery, a film shot clandestinely in the townships of Johannesburg, South Africa in 1959. The film’s pointed condemnation of apartheid and joyful celebration of township culture is hinted at in the accidental split-screen image of the poster’s photograph, with its busking children below scornful onlookers (I love how Meola zeroes in on the prime representative of this police state within the middle C of the title).

The poster for Béla Tarr’s The Turin Horse, which opens on February 10th, (and which,
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Son Of No One Review (3 out of 5 stars). Melodrama saps the gritty realism from NY cop drama

Review of Son Of No One - Loses control of its dirty cop drama via melodramatic performances. The gritty love affair filmmaker Dito Montiel shows for New York City and especially his former stomping grounds in Queens in his third feature Son of No One follows in the footsteps of greats like John Cassavetes and Martin Scorsese and goes as far back in cinema geekdom as Lionel Rogosin's 1957 underbelly classic On the Bowery. Montiel has a way with the sidewalk lowlifes and petty thieves ignored by Hollywood's depictions of fantasy New York awash in luxury. In his corrupt cop tale Son of No One, the former Punk Rocker, sometimes journalist and author also shows talent for the type of male, toilet seat melodramas that show men screaming and crying just as loud as any kitchen sink women. Realistic, New York grit may be the surface level detail that connects
See full article at Upcoming-Movies.com »

Son Of No One Review (3 out of 5 stars). Melodrama saps the gritty realism from NY cop drama

Review of Son Of No One - Loses control of its dirty cop drama via melodramatic performances. The gritty love affair filmmaker Dito Montiel shows for New York City and especially his former stomping grounds in Queens in his third feature Son of No One follows in the footsteps of greats like John Cassavetes and Martin Scorsese and goes as far back in cinema geekdom as Lionel Rogosin's 1957 underbelly classic On the Bowery. Montiel has a way with the sidewalk lowlifes and petty thieves ignored by Hollywood's depictions of fantasy New York awash in luxury. In his corrupt cop tale Son of No One, the former Punk Rocker, sometimes journalist and author also shows talent for the type of male, toilet seat melodramas that show men screaming and crying just as loud as any kitchen sink women. Realistic, New York grit may be the surface level detail that connects

Son Of No One Review (3 out of 5 stars). Melodrama saps the gritty realism from NY cop drama

Review of Son Of No One - Loses control of its dirty cop drama via melodramatic performances. The gritty love affair filmmaker Dito Montiel shows for New York City and especially his former stomping grounds in Queens in his third feature Son of No One follows in the footsteps of greats like John Cassavetes and Martin Scorsese and goes as far back in cinema geekdom as Lionel Rogosin's 1957 underbelly classic On the Bowery. Montiel has a way with the sidewalk lowlifes and petty thieves ignored by Hollywood's depictions of fantasy New York awash in luxury. In his corrupt cop tale Son of No One, the former Punk Rocker, sometimes journalist and author also shows talent for the type of male, toilet seat melodramas that show men screaming and crying just as loud as any kitchen sink women. Realistic, New York grit may be the surface level detail that connects
See full article at Upcoming-Movies.com »

'Social Network' Awarded by National Film Critics and Women Film Journalists

Rooney Mara and Jesse Eisenberg in The Social Network

Photo: Columbia Pictures Over the last few days The Social Network has racked up a few more awards, this time taking home the top prize from both the National Society of Film Critics (Nsfc) and the Alliance of Women Film Journalists (Awfj).

Network virtually swept the Nsfc awards winning best picture, director (David Fincher), actor (Jesse Eisenberg) and screenplay (Aaron Sorkin). It also won picture, director and screenplay from the Awfj where it also won best score (Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross), but Colin Firth won the actor award for his performance in The King's Speech.

So, The Social Network continues its run, but this weekend is where it will face its first big tests at the Broadcast Film Critics Awards on Friday, January 14 and the Golden Globes on Sunday, January 16. Neither award show will serve to be the end all,
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

Nsfc Loves France, Olivia Williams, The Social Network

The National Society of Film Critics, founded in the 1960s, remains one of the most prestigious critics groups. Though they follow numerous critics groups to their "best!" declarations each year, they don't usually take orders so well. You can always count on a surprise or two though there's still no denying The Social Network.

Olivia Williams takes her first prize for The Ghost Writer

Picture The Social Network (runner up: Carlos and Winter's Bone)

Director David Fincher for The Social Network (ru: Olivier Assayas for Carlos and Roman Polanski for The Ghost Writer)

Actress Giovanna Mezzogiorno in Vincere (ru: Annette Bening in The Kids Are All Right and Lesley Manville in Another Year)

Actor Jesse Eisenberg in The Social Network (ru tie: Colin Firth in The King's Speech and Edgar Ramirez in Carlos)

Supporting Actress Olivia Williams in The Ghost Writer (ru: Amy Adams in The Fighter and tied for
See full article at FilmExperience »

Arthouse Audit: 'Get Low' Goes Six Straight

Get Low managed to once again lead all limited releases despite seeing its fortunes fade. Among new releases, Catfish and Never Let Me Go led the way with solid per theater averages, while Jack Goes Boating and Leaves of Grass underwhelmed at just a handful of venues. Down 36 percent, Get Low made $551,494, bringing its total to $7.8 million. This marked the sixth-straight weekend that the Robert Duvall-Bill Murray comedy has topped the specialty list. The last movie to accomplish this feat was The Visitor, which led for six straight weekends from April to May 2008. Dabangg held the second spot for the second weekend in a row, falling 53 percent to $297,229. In ten days, the Bollywood action thriller has earned $1.07 million. The mystery surrounding Catfish seems to have translated to a fair amount of interest on its opening weekend. The social-networking docu-thriller debuted to $257,285 at 12 locations for a per theater average
See full article at Box Office Mojo »

In The August Notebook

  • MUBI
David Cairns

The Forgotten: Remember

The Forgotten: Cold Warrior

The Forgotten: The Other Other House

The Forgotten: Girls on a Motorcycle

Adrian Curry

Movie Poster of the Week: The Alamo Roadshow Posters of Olly Moss

Movie Poster of the Week: The Movie Posters of Tom Whalen

Movie Poster of the Week: Iranian Cinema of the 60s and 70s

Movie Poster of the Week: "On the Bowery"

Doug Dibbern

For the Filming of Widescreen Snowscapes and Against the Interpretation of Dreams

Veronika Ferdman

Karlovy Vary 2010: A Bohemian Rhapsody

Matthew Flanagan

Image of the Day. Records of Material Objects in the Cinema #4

S. Hahn

Image of the day. Looming

Boyd van Hoeij

Venice 2010 Preview

Daniel Kasman

Mysterious Extracts from a Film's Subtitle Track

A Gentleman Prefers Friends

Image of the Day. Cinema Villains & Villainy #1

The McKay Way

Image of the Day. Frames We Love

Video Sundays. Cabaret Cinema

For The Icon,
See full article at MUBI »

Movie Poster of the Week: "On the Bowery"

  • MUBI
A gorgeous new poster for Milestone Films’ release of the restoration of Lionel Rogosin’s 1957 documentary On the Bowery, which opens on September 17 at Film Forum. Part-verité, part staged drama, On the Bowery chronicles three days in the life of real-life war veteran Ray Salyer who has wound up on New York’s infamous skid row and is sinking fast. Rogosin spent four months shooting in bars and flop houses and under the El with real Bowery denizens, improvising a story around them.

I love the depth of field in the poster. The printed version especially sucks you into its damaged world. According to Anthony Deen, son of assistant cameraman Darwin Deen, this particular shot was set up by covering up the camera with bottles so that the people at the bar would feel comfortable and not pay attention to it.

It’s a beautiful still, but it’s the
See full article at MUBI »

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