7.9/10
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Mon Oncle (1958)

Mon oncle (original title)
Not Rated | | Comedy | 3 November 1958 (USA)
Monsieur Hulot visits the technology-driven world of his sister, brother-in-law, and nephew, but he can't quite fit into the surroundings.

Director:

Writers:

(artistic collaboration), (artistic collaboration) (as Jean L'Hote) | 1 more credit »
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
...
Lucien Frégis ...
Monsieur Pichard (as Lucien Fregis)
Betty Schneider ...
Betty, Landlord's Daughter
Jean-François Martial ...
Walter (as J.F. Martial)
...
Yvonne Arnaud ...
Georgette, the Housekeeper
Adelaide Danieli ...
Madame Pichard
Alain Bécourt ...
Gerard Arpel (as Alain Becourt)
Régis Fontenay ...
Braces Dealer (as Regis Fontenay)
Claude Badolle ...
Flea Market Dealer
Max Martel ...
Drunken Man
Nicolas Bataille ...
Working Man
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Storyline

Monsieur Hulot's brother-in-law is the manager of a factory where plastics are manufactured. His nephew grows up in a house where everything is fully automated and the boy is raised in a similar fashion. To take away the influence of the uncle on his son, his brother-in-law gets Hulot a job in his factory. Written by Leon Wolters <wolters@strw.LeidenUniv.nl>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Mr Hulot takes a precious, playful...and purely premeditated look at modern times... See more »

Genres:

Comedy

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Country:

|

Language:

Release Date:

3 November 1958 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Mon Oncle  »

Filming Locations:

 »

Box Office

Budget:

FRF 250,000 (estimated)
 »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

(Eastmancolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See  »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Mr. Hulot has almost no dialogue in the whole film. See more »

Goofs

When Hulot rides his bicycle through the puddle and splashes water on a man, the water sprays from a hose hidden in the puddle and is not caused by Hulot's bicycle. See more »

Quotes

Charles Arpel: We could go to the Sexy Club.
Madame Arpel: I prefer Constantino and his nice music.
See more »

Crazy Credits

The opening credits appear on signs at a construction site. See more »

Connections

Followed by Playtime (1967) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Amusing Stroll through a French Town
6 April 2005 | by (Backwoods Canada) – See all my reviews

The word I would use to describe this film is "amusing", not "hilarious"; "amusant" rather than "rigolo". It gently charms a smile onto your face. Only rarely does it bring out an actual guffaw (when M. Hulot is faced with his sister's kitchen, for example). Tati refuses to impose his own ideas of what is important on the viewer, which is usually done by spending more screen time on them or zooming in. The title (usually considered to be important) is a scrawled piece of graffiti which stays on the screen for less than 1/2 second, but there are long sequences showing M. Hulot's apartment. The viewer has to work to see Hulot appearing (apparently randomly) in the various windows of the building as he walks through it. I love the window which is inexplicably at foot level in which you can see Hulot's feet turn to the wall as the feet of a woman dressed only in a slip appear.

In other words, this film is a stroll where, if you keep your eyes open, you will spot some amusing things going on. And France is a great place for a stroll.

Two more things. While the comparison to Chaplin is apt, I was led to think of later characters, particularly Hrundi Bakshi in Blake Edwards' The Party and another almost silent character, Rowan Atkinson's Mr. Bean. Indeed I'm sure Atkinson stole ideas from this film.

Also, I think it is misleading to focus too much attention on M. Hulot's struggles with modern tech. The title, Mon Oncle, should direct our attention to the nephew, for whom Hulot is a parole from the prison of his sterile house, enabling him to run with the kids, get dirty, buy doughnuts from a grubby vendor who applies the icing sugar with a bare hand and play practical jokes on passers-by (with Hulot ready to cover for him if need be). Fifty years later these comments are even more biting as we look at a whole generation of children raised in this kind of inhuman antiseptic environment: overweight, with eating disorders and allergies, socially inept with only a TV and a video game for a friend. Makes a dachshund in a red coat want to run with the mutts and tip over a garbage can or two, doesn't it?


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