Man of a Thousand Faces (1957) - News Poster

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Operation Petticoat

Tony Curtis grew up idolizing the suave and funny Cary Grant, emulated his romantic moves as an actor and then performed a brilliant impersonation of Grant for Billy Wilder. The next step had to be co-starring with the great man himself. Blake Edwards’ amiable, relaxed submarine movie allows Grant to play with ladies’ under-things, while Curtis wrestles with a pig.

Operation Petticoat

Blu-ray

Olive Signature Edition

1959 / Color / 1:78 widescreen / 120 min. / Street Date July 1, 2014 / available through the Olive Films website / 39.95

Starring: Cary Grant, Tony Curtis, Joan O’Brien, Dina Merrill, Gene Evans, Dick Sargent, Virginia Gregg, Gavin MacLeod, Madlyn Rhue, Marion Ross, Arthur O’Connell.

Cinematography: Russell Harlan

Original Music: David Rose

Written by Paul King, Joseph Stone, Stanley Shapiro, Maurice Richlin

Produced by Robert Arthur

Directed by Blake Edwards

The latest in Olive Films’ Signature Selection special editions is Operation Petticoat, a light comedy war movie noted for teaming Cary Grant with Tony Curtis.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Remembering Unusual Post-wwii Novel That Led to 2 Movie Adaptations: One 'Straight,' One 'Gay'

Remembering Unusual Post-wwii Novel That Led to 2 Movie Adaptations: One 'Straight,' One 'Gay'
Crime novel The Blank Wall by Elisabeth Sanxay Holding. While her husband is away during World War II, housewife Lucia Holley – the sort of “Everywoman” who looks great in a two-piece bathing suit – does whatever it takes to protect the feeling of “normality” in her bourgeois, suburban household. The Blank Wall is a classic depiction of an attempted cover-up being much more serious than the actual crime. Sound bites: Remembering the classic crime novel 'The Blank Wall' and its two movie adaptations – 'The Reckless Moment' & 'The Deep End' Crime novel writer Elisabeth Sanxay Holding (1889–1955) is not a name familiar to many, and yet Raymond Chandler described her as “the top suspense writer of them all. She doesn't pour it on and make you feel irritated. Her characters are wonderful; and she has a sort of inner calm which I find very attractive.” Holding has been identified as “The Godmother of Noir” and, more
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Roger Smith, ‘77 Sunset Strip’ Star and Ann-Margret’s Husband, Dies at 84

Roger Smith, ‘77 Sunset Strip’ Star and Ann-Margret’s Husband, Dies at 84
Roger Smith, who starred in the series “77 Sunset Strip” and was married to actress Ann-Margret, died Sunday in Sherman Oaks. He was 84.

The handsome leading man retired from acting after being diagnosed with myasthenia gravis in 1980. After that, he managed his wife’s career and produced several of her TV specials. The couple had celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary on May 8.

On “77 Sunset Strip,” Smith played detective Jeff Spencer, who partnered with Efrem Zimbalist Jr. as his partner. The show ran from 1958 to 1964, though Smith left in 1963. His Spencer character made appearances on other detective shows of the period including “Surfside 6” and “Hawaiian Eye.”

After “77 Sunset Strip” ended its run, Smith had the title role in the comedy series “Mr. Roberts,” adapted from the movie about a World War II Navy lieutenant.

He also appeared in movies including “Man of a Thousand Faces,” “No Time to Be Young” and “Auntie Mame.”

He
See full article at Variety - TV News »

On this day: Dietrich Ascends, Elvis Screen-Tests, and Leslie Cheung Dies

on this day in history as it relates to showbiz...

Lon Chaney as The Phantom of the Opera1776 Pioneering mathematician Sophie Germain born. She's mentioned in the movie Proof but where's her biopic? There are so many 'hidden figures' out there to tell stories about

1883 Silent film star and "Man of a Thousand Faces" Lon Chaney is born. Becomes legendary doing monstrous film roles with early horror makeup: clowns, phantoms, hunchbacks, you name it...
See full article at FilmExperience »

Ten Tod Browning Films Airing on Turner Classics January 25th

Attention classic movie freaks – Set your DVR for this Monday!!!!

Tod Browning (1880-1962) was a pioneering director who helped establish the horror film genre. Born in Louisville Kentucky, Browning ran away to join the circus at an early age which influenced his later career in Hollywood and echoes of those years can be found in many of his films. Though best known as the director of the first sound version of Dracula starring Bela Lugosi in 1931, Browning made his mark on cinema in the silent era with his extraordinary 10-film collaboration with actor Lon Chaney, the ‘Man of a Thousand Faces’. Despite the success of Dracula, and the boost it gave his career, Browning’s chief interest continued to lie not in films dealing with the supernatural but in films that dealt with the grotesque and strange, earning him the reputation as “the Edgar Allan Poe of the cinema”. Browning
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Sliff 2015: Tribute to Tod Browning This Friday – The Unknown and Freaks

“Gooble-gobble, gooble-gobble, we accept her, we accept her, one of us, one of us.”

Cinema St. Louis presents a Tribute to Tod Browning Friday November 13th at Webster University’s Moore Auditorium as part of this year’s St. Louis International Film Festival. The program includes a 35mm screening of Browning’s 1927 silent shocker The Unknown with live music by The Rats and People Motion Picture Orchestra followed by a screening of Browning’s 1932 masterpiece Freaks. The event begins at 7:30pm and will be hosted by We Are Movie Geeks own Tom Stockman. Ticket information can be found Here

Tod Browning (1880-1962) was a pioneering director who helped establish the horror film genre. Born in Louisville Kentucky, Browning ran away to join the circus at an early age which influenced his later career in Hollywood and echoes of those years can be found in many of his films. Though
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Tribute To Tod Browning at Sliff November 13th – The Unknown and Freaks

“Gooble-gobble, gooble-gobble, we accept her, we accept her, one of us, one of us.”

Cinema St. Louis presents a Tribute to Tod Browning Friday November 13th at Webster University’s Moore Auditorium as part of this year’s St. Louis International Film Festival. The program includes a 35mm screening of Browning’s 1927 silent shocker The Unknown with live music by The Rats and People Motion Picture Orchestra followed by a screening of Browning’s 1932 masterpiece Freaks. The event begins at 7pm and will be hosted by We Are Movie Geeks own Tom Stockman

Tod Browning (1880-1962) was a pioneering director who helped establish the horror film genre. Born in Louisville Kentucky, Browning ran away to join the circus at an early age which influenced his later career in Hollywood and echoes of those years can be found in many of his films. Though best known as the director of the
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Bill Hader: ‘I’m a fraud, I really shouldn’t be here’

He has voiced a peanut in a TV ad and stars as Fear in Inside Out, as well as hosting Saturday Night Live. But, he says, he thought he’d blown it when he auditioned to co-star in Trainwreck with Amy Schumer

Bill Hader, Saturday Night Live’s erstwhile Man of a Thousand Faces, sits on a couch in a Los Angeles hotel suite wearing the one face we’re least familiar with: his own.

Said face is, to borrow a phrase Ricky Gervais used to describe Steve Carell, “nearly handsome”, meaning nice enough to gaze on in repose, but in motion possessed of all the rolling contours that make for comedy gold. Add a Belushi-esque repertoire of eyebrow moves, a leering smile and a voice that can switch from nasal whine to purring baritone in a heartbeat, and you have the perfect launchpad for the dozens of impersonations and
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Robert Evans: The Hollywood Flashback Interview

Producer Robert Evans, circa 1970s, in the documentary The Kid Stays in the Picture.

Robert Evans: The Kid Is Alright

By

Alex Simon

I interviewed legendary Hollywood producer Robert Evans in 2002 for Venice Magazine, in conjunction with the release of the documentary "The Kid Stays in the Picture," adapted from his iconic autobiography and audiobook. Our chat took place at Woodland, Evans' storied estate in Beverly Hills, in his equally famous screening room, which mysteriously burned down a couple years later. Evans was still physically frail, having recently survived a series of strokes, but his mind, his wit and his charm were sharp as ever, with near total recall for people, places and stories. Many, many stories. Here are a few of them.

It’s a widely-held belief that the years 1967-76 represent the “golden age” of American cinema. Just look at a few of these titles: Rosemary’s Baby,
See full article at The Hollywood Interview »

10 Celebrities Who Had Their Likenesses Stolen

Dr Martens

Nowadays your face is everything. An actor like Lon Chaney, “The Man Of A Thousand Faces”, was indispensable in the early days of Hollywood, making his way as a consistently credible actor who could nonetheless utterly transform himself using prosthetics, make-up and performance so as to render himself totally unrecognisable, being absorbed completely into any role he was cast in.

That’s not so much of a worry in the modern entertainment industry. In fact the opposite is true, with face rather than name recognition being the driving force behind getting people to go see films, to buy albums, to tune into TV shows, to shell out for perfume, cars, clothes, you name it. Selfies are the primary form of communication for a reason. It’s all about the face.

At a time when likenesses are at such a premium, the entertainment industry is naturally inclined to make
See full article at Obsessed with Film »

Actor Bill Oberst Jr. scores Lon Chaney award at FANtastic Horror Film Festival

The ever busy actor Bill Oberst Jr. (Criminal Minds, Children of Sorrow, Abraham Lincoln vs Zombies) recently took away a "Lon Chaney Award for Outstanding Achievement in Independent Horror Films" at the FANtastic Horror Film Festival. Read all about it in the details below.

From The Press Release

Actor Bill Oberst Jr. has received the "Lon Chaney Award for Outstanding Achievement in Independent Horror Films" at the FANtastic Horror Film Festival (Fhff) in San Diego. Ron Chaney, the great-grandson of Lon Chaney and the grandson of Lon Chaney Jr., was on hand along with Lon Chaney’s great-great-granddaughters Jaclynn & Jennifer to present Oberst with this first-ever award.

Festival organizers kept the award a secret to surprise Oberst, who has often cited Lon Chaney as a major influence and expressed a desire to play The Man Of A Thousand Faces on stage or screen. The actor was nearly speechless as Ron Chaney
See full article at MoreHorror »

Bill Oberst Jr. receives Lon Chaney Award

Actor Bill Oberst Jr. has received the Lon Chaney Award for Outstanding Achievement in Independent Horror Films, at the FANtastic Horror Film Festival (Fhff) in San Diego. Ron Chaney, the great-grandson of Lon Chaney and the grandson of Lon Chaney Jr., was on hand along with Lon Chaney’s great-great-granddaughters Jaclynn and Jennifer to present Oberst with this first-ever award.

Festival organizers kept the award a secret to surprise Oberst, who has often cited Lon Chaney as a major influence and expressed a desire to play The Man Of A Thousand Faces on stage or screen. The actor was nearly speechless as Ron Chaney called him forward at the Fhff Awards Banquet. “My inner 14 year-old horror kid is in overdrive right now,” he said. “Without the Chaney family there would be no horror genre.”

Ron Chaney, speaking for the family, thanked the Fhff crowd for helping to keep the Chaney
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Robert Englund interview: The Last Showing, Freddy Krueger and horror

Horror legend Robert Englund talks about his new film The Last Showing, what was wrong with the Nightmare On Elm St remake, and more...

Sitting with Robert Englund deep in the bowels of a gilded London hotel, it becomes obvious just what a great storyteller he is. As he reminisces about his early acting career in such films as Five Easy Pieces or Hustle, or goes even further back to his childhood brushes with the horror genre, he talks in a soothing, sonorous voice that is a million miles away from his signature role of Freddy Krueger.

Then again, Englund doesn't look or sound like the character in his latest movie, either. In The Last Showing, a psychological horror thriller written and directed by the UK's Phil Hawkins, Englund plays Stuart, a once proud projectionist who, thanks to the advent of digital cinema, finds himself busted down to the lowly
See full article at Den of Geek »

Julie Andrews' Rival in The Sound Of Music, 3-Time Oscar Nominee Has Died

Eleanor Parker dead at 91: ‘The Sound of Music’ actress, three-time Best Actress Oscar nominee (photo: Eleanor Parker ca. 1945) Eleanor Parker, one of the best and most beautiful actresses of the studio era, a three-time Best Actress Academy Award nominee, and one of the stars of the 1965 blockbuster and Best Picture Oscar winner The Sound of Music, died today, December 9, 2013, of complications from pneumonia at a medical facility near her home in the Southern Californian desert town of Palm Springs. Eleanor Parker was 91. “I’m primarily a character actress,” Parker told the Toronto Star in 1988. “I’ve portrayed so many diverse individuals on the screen that my own personality never emerged.” At one point, wildly imaginative publicists called her The Woman of a Thousand Faces — an absurd label, when you think of Man of a Thousand Faces Lon Chaney. Eleanor Parker never altered her appearance the way Chaney did — her
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Viennale 2013. Infinity Complex

  • MUBI
Infinite Anticipation

Here at the Vienna International Film Festival there are no multiplexes devoted to the festival. Every cinema is a single screen—all quite beautiful and some, like the Urania, Metro, Künstlerhaus, and Austrian Film Museum, very special indeed—and, scattered at a bit of a distance from one another, they trace a lopsided kind of ellipsis, a loop of cinema if you plan your itinerary right.

Above: Out 1, noli me tangere.

I came anticipating this particular suggestion of cinematic infinity, not just because of my memories of the last two years of repeatedly treading this touring path around the constrained city center of Vienna, but because of the promise of a much desired (by Jonathan Rosenbaum since 1996, and thereafter by an untold multitude of tantalized cinephiles) festival pairing of Jacques Rivette and Suzanne Schiffman's improvised serial intended for television, Out 1, noli me tangere (1971), and Louis Feuillade's
See full article at MUBI »

Countdown to Halloween - Dracula (1931)

To countdown to this year's Halloween, Luke Owen reviews a different horror film every day of October. Next up is 1931's Dracula...

Released in 1931 to critical and public praise, Dracula is not only one of Universal's most iconic movies, but is a film that would kickstart their Monster Movie line that would dominate the 30s and 40s. It was also the film that would give us the defining Dracula performance from Hungarian actor Bela Lugosi - a performance that has been rivalled and challenged, but never beaten. Nearly 80 years later, people are still imitating this legendary performance.

However, Lugosi's genius is not the sole reason why Dracula was a success. Director Tod Browning creates an incredible and chilling atmosphere with gorgeous cinematography, brilliant lighting choices, incredible sets and a haunting score that utilities Act II from Swan Lake. The script is also very strong with some wonderful lines of dialogue
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

The Forgotten: Mr. Monster

  • MUBI
Lon Chaney didn't speak during early childhood, as his parents were deaf and mute, and he communicated with them via sign language. When silent movies came along, he was a natural. And at the end of his life, stricken with throat cancer, he lost his voice and again relied on pantomime to make himself understood. He came from silence and went back to silence.

Chaney was a unique kind of movie star, in that his success rested more on variety than reliability: if his audiences had any expectations going into a Chaney film, surely they must have been expectations of surprise, perhaps of an encounter with the unfamiliar and bizarre.

Outside the Law (1920) was Chaney's second film for director Tod Browning, whose concerns seemed to merge with his own in a particularly conducive way: separately and apart, both men pursued stories of humiliation, disfigurement, and revenge, featuring bizarre, displaced menageries and elaborate and uncomfortable disguises.
See full article at MUBI »

Favorite Five: Makeup Artists

Favorite Five: Makeup Artists
When you were a kid, you might have thought makeup was for girls (or your grown-up self). You were full of $#!*. Makeup artists are one of the most under-sung components of movie making, though this certainly isn’t a misconception shared by genre fans, who have known for a long time how important the man or woman making the monsters are.

The makeup artists and practical special effects technicians are, in many ways, the driving force of movie magic. It wasn’t Just color coming to Oz that captured our imagination in Wizard Of Oz, it was how vivid that color blossomed in the Wicked Witch’s face, applied by the legendary Jack Dawn. The acting, atmosphere, and set designs for Alien were all top-notch, but it was H.R. Giger’s monstrous xenomorph and creature creations that drove it all home and made it stick with us in our nightmares.
See full article at Famous Monsters of Filmland »

Top Movies of the Teens

Everybody's favorite movie decade: Which ones are the best movies released in the 20th century's second decade? Best Film (Pictured above) Broken Blossoms: Barthelmess and Gish star as ill-fated lovers in D.W. Griffith’s romantic melodrama featuring interethnic love. Check These Out (Pictured below) Cabiria: is considered one of the major landmarks in motion picture history, having inspired the scope and visual grandeur of D.W. Griffith’s Intolerance. Also of note, Pastrone's epic of ancient Rome introduced Maciste, a bulky hero who would be featured in countless movies in the ensuing decades. Best Actor (Pictured below) In the tragic The Italian, George Beban plays an Italian immigrant recently arrived in the United States (Click below for film review). Unfortunately, his American dream quickly becomes a horrendous nightmare of poverty and despair. Best Actress (Pictured below) The movies' super-vamp Theda Bara in A Fool There Was: A little
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Guest Blog: Scott Essman's They're Still Alive - The Universal Classic Monsters

In celebration of the October 2nd Blu-ray release of the Universal Classic Monsters: The Essential Collection from Universal Studios Home Entertainment, veteran horror historian Scott Essman has prepared a truly monstrous trip back through time for you classic horror fans!

It’s a quiet dusty morning in the summer of 1916 and all but a small eastern region of the San Fernando Valley is largely undeveloped, to say nothing of unpopulated. For the past year, inside of an unassuming front gate just over the hill from Los Angeles proper, two men are trying to forge their path in the fledgling motion picture business: Lon Chaney and Jack Pierce. Nascent actors Chaney, 33, and Pierce, 27, were completely unknown, but each had an angle; they could both work magic out of a simple makeup case, fully transforming their faces and even parts of their bodies to put themselves into a better position to be cast in a role.
See full article at Dread Central »
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