Love in the Afternoon
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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

5 items from 2017


‘Feud: Bette and Joan’ Main Titles: How That Striking Vintage Opening Sequence Got Made

3 March 2017 8:00 AM, PST | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Without uttering a word, the main title sequence for FX’s new anthology series “Feud: Bette and Joan” sets the dramatic yet somber tone for the entire series by using musical and graphical cues from ‘60s cinema.

While the images trace the plot of “What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?,” it also reflects the misery of the actresses drawn into a cycle of torment of their own devising. Take a look at the sequence:

The credits fit right in with “Feud,” a technicolor feast that examines the even more colorful rivalry between acclaimed actresses Bette Davis and Joan Crawford, which reached its pinnacle while they co-starred in the psycho-biddy horror movie “What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?” in 1962. The series takes place during and after the shooting of the film, in which Bette (Susan Sarandon) and Joan (Jessica Lange) play combative siblings Baby Jane and Blanche, respectively. There is no love lost between these sisters, »

- Hanh Nguyen

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‘Feud: Bette and Joan’ Main Titles: How That Striking Vintage Opening Sequence Got Made

3 March 2017 8:00 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Without uttering a word, the main title sequence for FX’s new anthology series “Feud: Bette and Joan” sets the dramatic yet somber tone for the entire series by using musical and graphical cues from ‘60s cinema.

While the images trace the plot of “What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?,” it also reflects the misery of the actresses drawn into a cycle of torment of their own devising. Take a look at the sequence:

The credits fit right in with “Feud,” a technicolor feast that examines the even more colorful rivalry between acclaimed actresses Bette Davis and Joan Crawford, which reached its pinnacle while they co-starred in the psycho-biddy horror movie “What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?” in 1962. The series takes place during and after the shooting of the film, in which Bette (Susan Sarandon) and Joan (Jessica Lange) play combative siblings Baby Jane and Blanche, respectively. There is no love lost between these sisters, »

- Hanh Nguyen

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‘I Am Not Your Negro’ Review: Samuel L. Jackson Brings James Baldwin to Life in the Year’s Most Important Oscar Nominee

2 February 2017 7:02 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

There’s a remarkable cut in the opening minutes of Raoul Peck’s “I Am Not Your Negro” that instantly transforms this insightful cinematic essay into the most important movie of the year so far.

It’s the late 60’s, and James Baldwin appears on “The Dick Cavett Show” to explain his views on black life in America. “The real question,” he says, “is what’s going to happen to this country?” Peck abruptly shifts to the present, assembling a collage of images from black protests against police violence, set to the boisterous rhythms of Buddy Guy’s “Damn Right, I’ve Got the Blues.” That complex fusion of times, places and feelings yields an angry rallying cry that also functions as a lamentation of historical struggle, and it continues for the next 90 minutes. Peck doesn’t just resurrect Baldwin’s words from a contemporary perspective; he reignites their sense of purpose. »

- Eric Kohn

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Love in the Afternoon

31 January 2017 11:34 AM, PST | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Love in the Afternoon

Blu-ray

Warner Archive Collection

1957 / B&W / 1:85 widescreen / 130 min. / Street Date February 7, 2017 / available through the WBshop / 21.99

Starring Gary Cooper, Audrey Hepburn, Maurice Chevalier, John McGiver, Van Doude, Lise Bourdin, Louis Jourdan, Betty Schneider.

Cinematography: William C. Mellor

Film Editor: Leonid Azar

Art Direction: Alexandre Trauner

Adapted Music: Franz Waxman

Written by: Billy Wilder, I.A.L. Diamond from a novel by Claude Anet

Produced and Directed by Billy Wilder

A favorite of Billy Wilder-philes, Love in the Afternoon is a strong expression of the ‘romantic-Lubitsch’ vein in Wilder’s work. It’s essentially a return to the early ’30s Lubitsch comedies with Maurice Chevalier, but played in a more bittersweet Viennese register. It’s also Wilder’s first collaboration with the comedy screenwriter I.A.L. Diamond. Together they fashion the predominantly verbal comedy machine that will carry them through three or four big hits, and a few losers that have become classics anyway. »

- Glenn Erickson

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The Yakuza

24 January 2017 11:46 AM, PST | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

The Yakuza

Blu-ray

Warner Archive Collection

1975 / Color / 2:40 widescreen / 112 & 123 min. / Street Date February 14, 2017 / available through the WBshop / 21.99

Starring Robert Mitchum, Takakura Ken, Brian Keith, Eiji Okada, Richard Jordan, Keiko Kishi, James Shigeta, Herb Edelman.

Cinematography: Kozo Okazaki, Duke Callaghan

Production Design: Stephen Grimes

Art Direction: Yoshiyuki Ishida

Film Editor: Don Guidice, Thomas Stanford

Original Music: Dave Grusin

Written by: Leonard Schrader, Paul Schrader, Robert Towne

Produced by: Michael Hamilburg, Sydney Pollack, Koji Shundo

Directed by Sydney Pollack

 

The Warner Archive Collection is on a roll with a 2017 schedule that has so far released one much-desired library Blu-ray per week. Coming shortly are Vincente Minnelli’s Bells are Ringing, Billy Wilder’s Love in the Afternoon Ken Russell’s The Boy Friend and Val Guest’s When Dinosaurs Ruled the Earth, and that only takes us through February. First up is a piercing action drama from 1975.

There are favorite movies around Savant central, »

- Glenn Erickson

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

5 items from 2017


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