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The Best War Movies Ever Made — IndieWire Critics Survey

The Best War Movies Ever Made — IndieWire Critics Survey
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film and TV critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best film in theaters right now?”, can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: In honor of Christopher Nolan’s “Dunkirk,” what is the best war movie ever made?

Read More‘Dunkirk’ Review: Christopher Nolan’s Monumental War Epic Is The Best Film He’s Ever Made Richard Brody (@tnyfrontrow), The New Yorker

Howard Hawks’ “The Dawn Patrol,” from 1930, shows soldiers and officers cracking up from the cruelty of their missions — and shows the ones who manage not to, singing and clowning with an exuberance that suggests the rictus of a death mask. There’s courage and heroism, virtue and honor — at a price that makes the words themselves seem foul. John Ford’s “The Lost Patrol,
See full article at Indiewire »

Alexei Batalov obituary

Soviet actor who starred in award-winning films during a burst of freedom for the arts before repression set in again during the mid-60s

The years following the second world war represented a low point in Soviet cinema, both in quality and quantity. It was only after Stalin’s death in 1953 and Khrushchev’s speech in 1956 attacking aspects of Stalinism, that the Soviet film industry began to pick up.

The result of this thaw was a number of films that merited international success, notably Mikhail Kalatozov’s The Cranes Are Flying (1957), which was named best film at Cannes, and Josef Heifits’ The Lady With the Dog (1960, which got the special jury prize at Cannes. Both starred Alexei Batalov, who has died aged 88.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Russian Actor Alexey Batalov Dies at 88

Russian Actor Alexey Batalov Dies at 88
Russian actor Alexey Batalov, known for the 1957 Cannes winning film The Cranes are Flying and the 1980 Oscar-winning movie Moscow Doesn't Believe in Tears, died in Moscow on June 14 at the age of 88, Russian news agency TASS reported on Thursday, quoting the actor's personal assistant.

Batalov was born in the Central Russian city of Vladimir on November 20, 1928, into the family of actors of the Moscow Art Theatre (MKHAT).In 1950, he graduated from the Moscow Art Theatre's Acting Studio-School and joined the theater's troupe.
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

The Best Movies to Ever Win Cannes’ Palme d’Or — IndieWire Critic Survey

The Best Movies to Ever Win Cannes’ Palme d’Or  — IndieWire Critic Survey
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film and TV critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best film in theaters right now?”, can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: In honor of the Cannes Film Festival, the 70th edition of which starts this week, what is the best film to ever win the coveted Palme d’Or?

For a complete list of Palme d’Or winners, click here.

Erin Whitney (@Cinemabite), ScreenCrush

This question is impossible because I clearly haven’t seen all 40 Palme d’Or winners (it’s on my to do list, I swear). But I could easily say “Apocalypse Now,” “Paris, Texas,” “Taxi Driver,” “Amour,” or even “Pulp Fiction.” But since this is a personal question, I have to say “The Tree of Life.” No film has moved me
See full article at Indiewire »

Mosfilm’s Karen Shakhnazarov: ‘Russian Cinema Is Very Different From Soviet Cinema’

Mosfilm’s Karen Shakhnazarov: ‘Russian Cinema Is Very Different From Soviet Cinema’
Marrakech, Morocco — The Marrakech Film Festival has been organizing country tributes since its fourth edition in 2004, honouring such grand filmmaking traditions as France, the U.K, and India and in the last three editions, Scandinavia, Japan and Canada.

But choosing to organize a tribute to Russia – whose landmass spans from Europe to the Far East, and which launched the world’s first film school, Vgik, and has spawned key filmmakers, including Eisenstein, Tarkovsky, Sokourov and Zviaguinstev – is perhaps the festival’s most ambitious challenge to date.

Two Russian films have won Marrakech’s top prize, the Golden Star: Mikhail Kalatozishvili’s “Wild Field” in 2008, and Ivan Tverdovsky’s “Corrections Class” in 2014. Tverdovsky’s coming-of-age drama “Zoology,” that won a Special Jury Prize at Karlovy Vary, is screening in Marrakech competition this year. It has been one of the most talked about pics at the fest.

An extensive delegation travelled to the red city,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

New to Streaming: ‘Pete’s Dragon,’ Pedro Almodóvar, ‘Train to Busan,’ ‘The Bfg,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

Always Shine (Sophia Takal)

With the excess of low-budget, retreat-in-the-woods dramas often finding characters hashing out their insecurities through a meta-narrative, a certain initial resistance can occur when presented with such a derivative scenario at virtually every film festival. While Sophia Takal‘s psychological drama Always Shine ultimately stumbles, the chemistry of its leads and a sense of foreboding dread in its formal execution ensures its heightened view of
See full article at The Film Stage »

Behind the Celluloid Curtain: #1 "The Lady with the Dog"

  • MUBI
This is the first letter in the first series of what will be an ongoing installment of correspondences between Scout Tafoya and Veronika Ferdman on the topic of Soviet cinema. Each series will be organized around a theme—director, genre, time period, mood or more whimsical connectors such as color or season. In short, the writers reserve the right to let Soviet cinema be their muse and guide the orientation of the letter writing. For this inaugural dispatch from the celluloid wonders of the Soviet bloc the subject can best be described as love in a time of discontent.Dear Veronika,I’m excited to be writing to you about the many, many undiscovered, unsung gems hiding in the vast canon of Russian cinema. There’s so much to cover that it’s frankly a little overwhelming to me. A whole world of movies I’ve never heard of just waiting to be watched.
See full article at MUBI »

Japan is big winner in Moscow

  • ScreenDaily
Japan was the big winner at this year’s Moscow International Film Festival which ended on Saturday evening with the Golden St. George trophy for best film going to Kazuyoshi Kumakiri’s My Man (Watashi-No Otoko) [pictured].The film, which also received the Silver St. George best actor honours for Tadanobu Asano, had its international premiere in Moscow and was the first Japanese film to win the grand prix since Kaneto Shindo’s Will To Live received the honour

Japan was the big winner at this year’s Moscow International Film Festival which ended on Saturday evening with the Golden St. George trophy for best film going to Kazuyoshi Kumakiri’s My Man (Watashi-No Otoko) [pictured].

The film, which also received the Silver St. George best actor honours for Tadanobu Asano, had its international premiere in Moscow and was the first Japanese film to win the grand prix since Kaneto Shindo’s Will To Live received the honour in 1999.

Kumakiri
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Cannes: Dealmakers Lose Faith in Russia

Cannes: Dealmakers Lose Faith in Russia
Feelings in Cannes about Russian cinema and the Russian film market are a study in contrasts. On one hand, with Andrei Zvyagintsev's much-ballyhooed competition title Leviathan, Russia has its best shot at winning a Palme d'Or since Mikhail Kalatozov's The Cranes Are Flying took the festival's top honor for the Soviet Union back in 1958. But the ongoing political stand off between Moscow and Ukraine has shaken economic confidence in Russia. “The Russian rubble has fallen 20 percent compared to last year,” said Alexander van Dulmen, CEO of A Company, which buys and distributes titles for the Russian

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See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Tatiana Samoilova obituary

Russian actor who starred in the only Soviet film to have won the Palme d'Or

At the 1958 Cannes film festival, in a competition that included films by Ingmar Bergman, Jacques Tati and Satyajit Ray, the Palme d'Or was presented to Mikhail Kalatozov's The Cranes Are Flying, the first and last Soviet film ever to have won it, and a special mention was given to Tatiana Samoilova, its captivating 23-year-old star.

Samoilova, who has died from coronary heart disease aged 80, became the centre of media attention, her elfin beauty prompting many to call her the "Russian Audrey Hepburn". Unlike the stereotypical western vision of Soviet womanhood hefty, heroic, smiling tractor-drivers among the corn derived from years of socialist realist films, Samoilova came as a revelation. Here was a seductive, sensitive and serious young woman with whom international audiences could sympathise. At the time, Samoilova was given a watch by East
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Iconic 'Russian Audrey Hepburn' Dies at Age 80; Starred in Only Russian/Soviet Movie to Win Palme d'Or

Russian movie star Tatiana Samoilova dead at 80; known as ‘the Russian Audrey Hepburn,’ Samoilova was best remembered for Cannes winner ‘The Cranes Are Flying’ (photo: Tatiana Samoilova in ‘The Cranes Are Flying’) Russian film star Tatiana Samoilova, best remembered for playing the female lead in Mikhail Kalatozov’s 1957 romantic drama The Cranes Are Flying, died of heart complications at Moscow’s Botkin Hospital late night on May 4, 2014 — the day the Leningrad-born (now St. Petersburg) actress turned 80. Samoilova, who had been suffering from coronary heart disease and hypertension, had been hospitalized the previous day. The daughter of iconic stage and film actor Yevgeny Samoilov, among whose credits was the title role in a 1954 production of Hamlet and several leads in highly popular movies made during World War II, Tatiana Samoilova studied ballet at Moscow’s prestigious Stanislavsky and Nemirovich-Danchenko music theater. Beginning in 1953, she took acting lessons for three years
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Box Office: The January Drought

Amir here, with the weekend’s box office report. The first week of January is without doubt host to the least exciting crop of new films every year. Generally speaking, the only type of wide release is horror mediocrities like Texas Chainsaw Massacre 3D or this year’s The Marked Ones. Do Not let the presence of ‘paranormal activity’ in the title fool you. It’s a trick to get you to see another film in the same found footage series that started five years ago. Because I’m a masochist, I have seen all previous installments, the best (and first) of which I can, at my most generous, describe with a shrug. Ever since, the franchise has been in a qualitative downward spiral that is now drowning its box office too. $18m is dismal business for this series, though it frankly surpasses my expectations.

The real story, like last week,
See full article at FilmExperience »

2013 Memorial Day marathons: 'Arrested Development,' 'Veronica Mars' and more

If you don't have travel plans for Memorial Day weekend, get cozy on the couch (and set your DVR) because there are plenty of fun marathons happening.

Need to catch up on Season 1 of "Longmire" before the Season 2 premiere Monday, May 27? Want to re-live "Veronica Mars" Season 1? How about watching the entire series of "Arrested Development" (and reading our re-watch posts) before the new season is out on Netflix?

Here is all your Memorial Day weekend programming, all times Eastern.

Friday, May 24

A&E: "Storage Wars" marathon, 3 p.m. to 4 a.m. the next day

Animal: "Finding Bigfoot" marathon, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m., "Invasion" premiere and new episode, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Bravo: "The Real Housewives of New Jersey" marathon, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m., "Millionaire Matchmaker" marathon, 7 p.m. to 4 a.m. the next day

Chiller: "The Twilight Zone" marathon, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Discovery: "Sons of Guns" marathon,
See full article at Zap2It - From Inside the Box »

Summer Movie Survey. We Celebrate! (Part 1)

How was the summer for you? Did you shove tips in Magic Mike's loincloth at the Xquisite or strap on utility belts to fight for Gotham's soul? Maybe you freaked out in outer/auteur space with Ridley Scott, or demonstrated super popcorn-eating powers with Joss Whedon and The Avengers or devoured art house offerings as enthusiastically as Hushpuppy cracked those crab shells in Beasts of the Southern Wild?

We totally want to hear your great takeaways from summer movie season, so we'll go first. Sharing Time! I sent my frequent contributors a little questionnaire -- a "Summer Report Card" if you will -- to get the thingie about their summer at the movies to get this comment party started and here's what I got back. I had such fun reading these and I hope you do too. This weekend I'll be joined by my podcast mates Joe Reid
See full article at FilmExperience »

Letter Never Sent Blu Ray Review

Letter Never Sent Directed by Mikhail Kalatozov Written by Grigori Koltunov, Valeri Osipov and Viktor Rozov Starring: Innokenti Smoktunovsky, Tatyana Samoilova, Vasili Livanov, Yevgeny Urbansky There's something to be said about Criterion's boutique releases and their in-depth extras and fancy packaging, but it's the curatory nature of the label that allows for the discovery of some great films that might not have otherwise come across your blu ray/DVD player. I went into Mikhail Kalatozov's Letter Never Sent blindly (outside of some knowledge about his films Soy Cuba and The Cranes Are Flying) and was absolutely blown away. As a fan of survival-thrillers, the classic man against nature story had me hooked and the filmmaking on display is absolutely mindblowing. The film opens as four people -- three geologists and a guide -- are left in the Siberian Taiga. It's spring time and they're searching for diamonds. Their mission
See full article at FilmJunk »

What’s All The Hulu-baloo About? This Week In Criterion’s Hulu Channel

There are Tons of new releases this past week, and as my co-host and friend Travis George said, it was going to be a hell of a time to write these up for all of you people out there who want to know about Criterion’s blossoming Hulu Plus page. And as usual, I’m elated to tell you all about these films, especially if you want to join up to the service, which helps us keep this weekly article series going. I mean, come on, there’s an Ingmar Bergman film that’s not in the collection yet! More on that at the end of the article. So let’s get right to it then.

The epic film The Human Condition (1959) has been put up, separated into three videos. Parts 1 & 2, Parts 3 & 4 and Parts 5 & 6 are there for your ease of watching, so if you have 574 minutes to kill watching the
See full article at CriterionCast »

Steven Soderbergh Chronicles Every Movie He Watched In The Past Year

Beginning in March 2010, Steven Soderbergh decided to document his cultural diet for the year, noting down everything he watched and read, the results of which have just been made public. Taking in almost a hundred movies, 50 books and several tv shows, Soderbergh also found time to finish shooting two movies, Haywire and Contagion. Put’s us to shame, right?

The list, which is also dated and organised was given to Studio 360′s Kurt Anderson and reveals busy viewing days, possible favourites and no less than 20 viewings of his new film Haywire, 5 of The Social Network (none of the other Oscar noms get a look in!), and several Raiders of The Lost Ark, in black and white! And if he sticks to his retirement plans in the near future, god knows how large this list may grow.

Here is the list of just the movies he devoured and in the order
See full article at Obsessed with Film »

Taj Enlighten Film Society to showcase Russian films

Taj Enlighten Film Society to showcase Russian films
The Russian embassy has tied up with Taj Enlighten Film Society to showcase some of the classic war films to commemorate 65th year of the victory of Russia in the World War II. The three films that will be screened- The Cranes Are Flying, Come and See and Ballad of a Soldier are poignant human stories within the backdrop of the turmoil of war.

Ballad of a Soldier will be screened on April 4 followed by an interaction with Russian consulate general. The Cranes are Flying will be screened on April 11 while Come and See will be screened on April 18 at Cinemax Versova.

The Cranes are Flying will be screened on April 4 and Come and See will be screened on April 25 at Metro Big Cinemas.

On public demand, Taj Enlighten Film Society is also screening two of Majid Majidi’s films again: Children of Heaven and The Color of Paradise. Children of Heaven
See full article at DearCinema.com »

Dinner with the Straubs, and More: Toby Talbot's Cinephilic Memoir

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Above: The second in New Yorker's "American Premieres" series: April 6-May 10, 1967.

In her author photo on the back jacket flap of her book, Toby Talbot is standing outside, leaning against some structure, a fence maybe. Her hand hangs at her side; she's wearing a sheer red scarf around her neck and tilting her head back, squinting a bit and smiling quite confidently at the camera. She looks very much like a woman who knows her own mind.

This impression is more than borne out by the writing inside her book, The New Yorker Theater And Other Secrets From A Life At The Movies. Talbot is the wife of and partner in all things with Dan Talbot; together they founded the legendary New Yorker Theater in the early '60s. More than a rep house, it was a defining feature of New York—and hence, international—film culture for over a decade.
See full article at MUBI »

This week's film events

War And Russian Cinema, London

This week marks the 66th anniversary of the end of the siege of Leningrad, one of the most destructive episodes of the second world war, and honouring the occasion is a trio of films at the Lumière on Russia's painful wartime experience. Leading the way is the premiere of Leningrad, an epic, beautifully acted tale from deep inside the 900-day Nazi siege of the city, in which two women (Mira Sorvino and Olga Sutulova) cope with the continual threat of death, starvation and violence. It's followed by a Q&A session with director Alexander Buravsky. The other entries are Mikhail Kalatozov's 1957 Palme D'Or winner, The Cranes Are Flying, which concentrates on the psychological damage the war inflicted on the Soviet psyche, and 2001's Stalingrad-based sniper movie Enemy At The Gates starring Jude Law, Joseph Fiennes and Ed Harris.

Ciné Lumière, SW7, Wed to 31 Jan,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »
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