IMDb > Throne of Blood (1957)
Kumonosu-jô
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Throne of Blood (1957) More at IMDbPro »Kumonosu-jô (original title)

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Overview

User Rating:
8.1/10   33,635 votes »
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Popularity: ?
Down 12% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers:
Hideo Oguni (screenplay) &
Shinobu Hashimoto (screenplay) ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for Throne of Blood on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
22 November 1961 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
From the creator of "Rashomon" and "Ikiru"
Plot:
A war-hardened general, egged on by his ambitious wife, works to fulfill a prophecy that he would become lord of Spider's Web Castle. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
3 wins & 1 nomination See more »
NewsDesk:
(137 articles)
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User Reviews:
Shakespeare meets Kurosowa (round 1) See more (122 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (complete, awaiting verification)

Toshirô Mifune ... Taketoki Washizu

Isuzu Yamada ... Lady Asaji Washizu

Takashi Shimura ... Noriyasu Odagura
Akira Kubo ... Yoshiteru Miki
Hiroshi Tachikawa ... Kunimaru Tsuzuki (as Yôichi Tachikawa)

Minoru Chiaki ... Yoshiaki Miki
Takamaru Sasaki ... Kuniharu Tsuzuki
Gen Shimizu
Kokuten Kôdô ... Military Commander
Kichijirô Ueda ... Washizu's workman
Eiko Miyoshi ... Old Woman at castle
Chieko Naniwa ... Old Ghost Woman
Nakajirô Tomita ... Second Military Commander
Yû Fujiki ... Washizu samurai
Sachio Sakai ... Washizu samurai
Shin Ôtomo ... Washizu samurai
Yoshio Tsuchiya ... Washizu samurai
Yoshio Inaba ... Third Military Commander
Takeo Oikawa ... Miki party member
Akira Tani ... Washizu soldier
Ikio Sawamura ... Washizu soldier
Yutaka Sada ... Washizu samurai
Seijirô Onda ... Second Miki party member
Shinpei Takagi ... Commander
Masao Masuda ... Commander
Mitsuo Asano
Shôbun Inoue ... Servant
Asao Koike
Takeshi Katô ... Guard killed by Washizu

Hitoshi Takagi ... Tsuzuki guard
Michiya Higuchi ... Tsuki guard
Senkichi Ômura ... Washizu samurai
Gorô Sakurai ... Servant
Shirô Tsuchiya ... Commander
Takeo Matsushita ... Commander
Jun Ôtomo ... Commander
Kamayuki Tsubono ... Servant
Fuminori Ôhashi ... Samurai
Isao Kimura ... Phantom samurai
Seiji Miyaguchi ... Phantom samurai
Nobuo Nakamura ... Phantom samurai

Directed by
Akira Kurosawa 
 
Writing credits
Hideo Oguni (screenplay) &
Shinobu Hashimoto (screenplay) &
Ryûzô Kikushima (screenplay) &
Akira Kurosawa (screenplay)

William Shakespeare  play "Macbeth" (uncredited)

Produced by
Akira Kurosawa .... producer
Sôjirô Motoki .... producer
 
Original Music by
Masaru Satô 
 
Cinematography by
Asakazu Nakai 
 
Production Design by
Yoshirô Muraki 
 
Makeup Department
Masanori Kobayashi .... makeup artist (as M. Kobayashi)
Yoshiko Matsumoto .... hair stylist
Junjirô Yamada .... hair stylist
 
Production Management
Hiroshi Nezu .... production supervisor
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Yoshimitsu Banno .... assistant director (as Yoshimitsu Sakano)
Hiromichi Horikawa .... chief assistant director
Mimachi Norase .... chief assistant director
Ken Sano .... assistant director
Shoya Shimizu .... assistant director
Yasuyoshi Tajitsu .... assistant director
Michio Yamamoto .... assistant director
 
Art Department
Kôhei Ezaki .... art supervisor
Kôichi Hamamura .... property master
Yoshifumi Honda .... assistant art director
Kaneko .... props
 
Sound Department
Ichirô Minawa .... sound effects editor
Masanao Uehara .... assistant sound
Fumio Yanoguchi .... sound recordist
 
Special Effects by
Eiji Tsuburaya .... special effects (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Masao Fukuda .... still photographer
Shozo Hada .... assistant lighting technician
Kuichirô Kishida .... lighting director
Takao Saitô .... assistant camera
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Taiki Mori .... costumer
 
Editorial Department
Chozo Obata .... negative cutter
 
Other crew
Fabrice Arduini .... french adaptation: original version with subtitles
Shigeru Endo .... horseback riding instructor
Ikemichi Hashimoto .... accountant
Ienori Kaneko .... horseback riding instructor
Teruyo Nogami .... script supervisor
Keiko Tsubai .... french adaptation: original version with subtitles
Pascal Vincent .... press attache: France (re-release: 2001 )
 
Crew believed to be complete


Production CompaniesDistributorsSpecial EffectsOther Companies
  • C.D.C.  Italian post-synchronized version made by
  • Fono Roma  post-synchronization: Italian dubbed version
  • Toho Studios  sound stages

Additional Details

Also Known As:
"Kumonosu-jô" - Japan (original title)
"The Throne of Blood" - Canada (English title) (imdb display title)
See more »
Runtime:
110 min
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Western Electric Recording) | Mono (Perspecta Sound encoding)
Certification:
Argentina:16 | Australia:PG | Canada:G (Quebec) | Finland:K-15 (new rating: 2001) | Finland:K-16 (original rating) | Germany:12 | Mexico:B (2015) | Netherlands:12 | Norway:15 | Portugal:M/12 | Singapore:PG | South Africa:PG | Sweden:15 | Switzerland:14 | UK:A (original rating) | UK:12 (re-rating) (2001) | UK:PG (video rating) (1991) | USA:Unrated | USA:TV-MA (cable rating)
Filming Locations:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
The film combines Shakespeare's play with the Noh style of drama. Akira Kurosawa was an admirer of Noh, which he preferred over Kabuki. In particular, he wished to incorporate Noh-style body movements and set design. Noh also makes use of masks, and the evil spirit is seen, in different parts of the film, wearing faces reminiscent of these masks, starting with yaseonna (old lady). Noh often stresses the Buddhist doctrine of impermanence. This is connected to Washizu being denied salvation, with the chorus singing that his ghost is still in the world. The film score's use of flute and drum are also drawn from Noh.See more »
Goofs:
Continuity: After Macbeth and Banquo come to the forest clearing where the spirit dwells, as they get down from their horses, all of Macbeth's arrows fall out of his quiver. In the next shot however, the quiver is full of arrows again.See more »
Quotes:
Lady Asaji Washizu:Admirable, my Lord. You, who would soon rule the world, allow a ghost to frighten you.See more »
Movie Connections:
Version of Shakespeare's Macbeth (1999) (TV)See more »

FAQ

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32 out of 43 people found the following review useful.
Shakespeare meets Kurosowa (round 1), 25 May 2002
Author: OttoVonB from Switzerland

The Scottish Play gets a very Oriental makeover in this combination of samurai film and Noh theater from master filmmaker Akira Kurosawa. As a fan of both AK and Shakespeare I owed it to myself to give this a go, particularly as this play has drawn many gifted filmmakers over the years, always to interesting results.

If you know Kurosawa's Seven Samurai or Yojombo, your expectations going into Throne of Blood will probably let you down at first. The energy and visual flair are there, but expressed very differently: a suffocating formality and simmering rage replaces the vitality and dynamism of those other films. Lost in a thick, perpetual fog, Kurosawa's characters stumble around like broken puppets, heavily made up in Noh theater makeup that is at first hard to adjust to. it creates a useful distance, and underlines the power of the cruel hand of Fate, moving its victims across an apocalyptic landscape to a shockingly violent conclusion, one you would do well not to preview online before viewing the film.

Of his three adaptations - Ran being a masterful retelling of King Lear and The Bad Sleep Well using elements of Hamlet - this is the least accessible, but also the most visionary and unique. Oddly enough, it has similarities to Orson Welles' earlier adaptation made half a world away. Both films focus on tribal symbolism, are doused in fog and could never conceivably have had the same impact in color.

If you're interested in either Japanese cinema or Shakespeare, this should definitely be near the top of your list. As an entry-point to Kurosawa's catalog, you'd probably be better off with some less weighty fare.

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