IMDb > A King in New York (1957)
A King in New York
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A King in New York (1957) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

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Director:
Writer:
Charles Chaplin (written by)
Contact:
View company contact information for A King in New York on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
12 September 1957 (UK) See more »
Genre:
Plot:
A recently-deposed European monarch seeks shelter in New York City, where he becomes an accidental television celebrity and is later wrongly accused of being a Communist. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Awards:
1 nomination See more »
NewsDesk:
(9 articles)
Chaplin or The Weight of Myth
 (From MUBI. 22 July 2014, 5:42 AM, PDT)

Echoes #16
 (From MUBI. 23 August 2013, 1:14 PM, PDT)

Notebook's 5th Writers Poll: Fantasy Double Features of 2012
 (From MUBI. 9 January 2013, 9:40 AM, PST)

User Reviews:
"Do I have to be a Communist to read Karl Marx?" See more (47 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Charles Chaplin ... King Shahdov
Maxine Audley ... Queen Irene
Jerry Desmonde ... Prime Minister Voudel
Oliver Johnston ... Ambassador Jaume
Dawn Addams ... Ann Kay - TV Specialist
Sidney James ... Johnson - TV Advertiser
Joan Ingram ... Mona Cromwell - Hostess
Michael Chaplin ... Rupert Macabee
John McLaren ... Macabee Senior
Phil Brown ... Headmaster
Harry Green ... Lawyer
Robert Arden ... Liftboy
Alan Gifford ... School Superintendent
Robert Cawdron ... U.S. Marshal
George Woodbridge ... Member of Atomic Commission
Clifford Buckton ... Member of Atomic Commission
Vincent Lawson ... Member of Atomic Commission

Shani Wallis ... Singer
Joy Nichols ... Singer
Lauri Lupino Lane ... Comedian
George Truzzi ... Comedian
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Yvonne Romain ... Older Girl (as Yvonne Warren)
Tony Crombie ... Nightclub Drummer (uncredited)
Pat Gibson ... Girl (uncredited)
Wendy Graham ... (uncredited)
Lilian Grassom ... Cute Girl (uncredited)
Arthur Gross ... Autograph Hunter (uncredited)
Tubby Hayes ... Nightclub Saxophonist (uncredited)

Frazer Hines ... Boy (uncredited)
Roy Hines ... Boy (uncredited)
Penelope Horner ... Girl (uncredited)
Jemma Hyde ... Girl (uncredited)
Jeanette Jacobs ... Girl (uncredited)
Pauline Keen ... Older Girl (uncredited)
Kevin Kelly ... Boy (uncredited)
Hugh McDermott ... Bill Johnson (uncredited)
MacDonald Parke ... (uncredited)
Jose Read ... Boy (uncredited)
Michael Saunders ... Boy (uncredited)
Antoinette Seaborn ... Girl (uncredited)
Richard Shaw ... Butler (uncredited)
Bernice Swanson ... (uncredited)
Gareth Tandy ... Boy (uncredited)
Nicholas Tanner ... Butler (uncredited)
David Tilley ... Boy (uncredited)
Howard Vaughn ... Boy (uncredited)
Gillian Watt ... Teenager (uncredited)
Ross Yeo ... Boy (uncredited)

Directed by
Charles Chaplin 
 
Writing credits
Charles Chaplin (written by)

Produced by
Charles Chaplin .... producer (uncredited)
Jerome Epstein .... associate producer (uncredited)
 
Original Music by
Charles Chaplin (music composed by)
 
Cinematography by
Georges Périnal (director of photography) (as Georges Perinal)
 
Film Editing by
John Seabourne Sr.  (as John Seabourne)
 
Art Direction by
Allan Harris 
 
Makeup Department
Stuart Freeborn .... makeup
Helen Penfold .... hair stylist
 
Production Management
Eddie Pike .... production manager
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
René Dupont .... assistant director (as Rene Dupont)
David Tringham .... third assistant director (uncredited)
 
Art Department
Peter Mullins .... set dresser (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
John Cox .... sound supervisor
Bob Jones .... sound recordist
Spencer Reeve .... sound editor
Bert Ross .... sound recordist
 
Special Effects by
Wally Veevers .... special effects
 
Visual Effects by
Bob Cuff .... matte painter (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Jeff Seaholme .... camera operator
Ron Drinkwater .... clapper loader (uncredited)
Wally Fairweather .... focus puller (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
John Wilson-Apperson .... wardrobe supervisor (as J. Wilson-Apperson)
 
Editorial Department
Tony Bohy .... assistant editor
 
Music Department
Leighton Lucas .... music conducted by
Boris Sarbek .... music arranged by
Eric James .... musical associate (uncredited)
Dave Shand .... music associate (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Barbara Cole .... continuity
Mickey Delamar .... production controller
 
Crew verified as complete


Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
110 min | Argentina:105 min | USA:105 min
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Westrex Recording System)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
The first film that Charles Chaplin made in the UK after his exile from America, and his last leading role in a movie.See more »
Goofs:
Factual errors: During his diatribe, Rupert claims that the Roman Empire fell with the assassination of Caesar. Caesar's assassination occurred 17 years before the Roman Empire was established.See more »
Quotes:
[after being called for questioning by the government on suspicions of Communist affiliations]
Rupert Macabee:I'm so sick and tired of people asking me if I'm this, if I'm that!
See more »
Movie Connections:
Referenced in Lost in Translation (2003)See more »
Soundtrack:
The Sadness Goes OnSee more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
10 out of 11 people found the following review useful.
"Do I have to be a Communist to read Karl Marx?", 12 December 2007
Author: ackstasis from Australia

Charles Chaplin had a love-hate relationship with the United States of America. On the one hand, it was in Hollywood that the British-born comedian and filmmaker built a successful life and career, immortalising himself as one of the most beloved directors and stars in the history of cinema. On the other hand, Chaplin's political attitudes during the 1940s – that America should form an alliance with the Soviet Union in order to fight Adolf Hitler's fascist regime – led to his being labelled a Communist or Communist sympathiser. In 1952, Chaplin returned to his home-town of London for the premiere of the brilliant 'Limelight (1952),' where he was greeted with great enthusiasm, though with his arrival came the news that the American government had rescinded his re-entry visa into the United States. Over the next few years, the aging filmmaker toyed with numerous ideas for his next film – including a possible resurrection of the Little Tramp – before settling upon 'A King in New York,' whose screenplay took about two years to complete.

'A King in New York (1957)' tells the story of King Shahdov (Chaplin), a dethroned monarch who seeks refuge in the United States, his entire wealth cunningly stolen from him. The film starts off as an amiable slapstick comedy, which is basically what I had been expecting, before branching off into darker territory, become a scathing satiric assault on almost everything that America stands for. When he first arrives in the country, King Shahdov revels in the peace and liberty of this grand nation, exclaiming to his dedicated ambassador, Jaume (Oliver Johnston): "if you knew what it means to breathe this free air. This wonderful, wonderful America. Its youth, its genius, its vitality!" However, through his relationship with a brilliant young boy, Rupert Macabee (Chaplin's own son, Michael), whose parents happen to be members of the Communist party, Shahdov becomes embroiled in the period's rampant McCarthyist witch-hunts, revealing the devastating truth that perhaps America's notions of freedom have become a mere illusion.

Despite Chaplin's insistence that "my picture isn't political," it most undoubtedly is, with the director – just as he did in the final scenes of 'Monsieur Verdoux (1947)' – evidently expressing his distaste for what society has become. It's easy to dismiss 'A King in New York' as pro-socialist propaganda, but to do so would be completely missing the very idea behind the film. Personally, I'm unsure of Chaplin's official stance on Communism itself, but the filmmaker certainly reviled the manner in which the United States government approached the issue, citing it as an immoral invasion of privacy and liberty. Chaplin described himself as having no political convictions: "I am an individualist, and I believe in liberty." Perhaps referring to the Hollywood blacklist, he once said: "These are days of turmoil and strife and bitterness. This is not the day of great artists; this is the day of politics."

'A King in New York' was filmed at Shepparton Studios in London, and the film does a very successful job of imitating the hustle-and-bustle of the Big Apple. As well as expressing his stance on McCarthyism, Chaplin also aims a few effective jabs at commercialisation and popular culture, prophetically predicting the prominence of commercial chain-stores, cosmetic surgery and reality television {when King Shahdov is unwittingly coaxed into attending a televised dinner party, continually baffled as to why his lady interest (Dawn Addams) keeps unexpectedly launching into advertisements}. Though my review has stressed the political implications of the film, 'A King in New York' also works pretty well as a light comedy, and I almost died laughing when Chaplin walked into the House Committee on Un-American Activities with a fire-hose attached to his finger. Michael Chaplin's impassioned tirades on the degradation of America were also a riot to watch, even if the young actor can occasionally be spotted mouthing his father's lines. Owing to its somewhat disagreeable stance towards the United States, Chaplin was unable to find any willing American distributors, and so 'A King in New York' remained unseen there until the 1970s. "Freedom of speech," indeed.

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Anti communist, anti McCarthyism, both, or neither? melinda2001
That guy on the poster looks like McCain... Mulholand_Driver
Happy Birthday!!!! oldmotem
Autobiographical? schwepps
Michael Chaplin HAMMERTHROW
this movie is 50 years old and.... purplehaze95825
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