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1-20 of 21 items from 2011   « Prev | Next »


Doe Avedon obituary

26 December 2011 4:05 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Model and movie star whose life story was the inspiration behind the film Funny Face

In 1944, the 21-year-old Richard Avedon, just starting out as a professional photographer after leaving the Us merchant marine, walked into a bank in Manhattan, New York, and saw a 19-year-old clerk called Dorcas Nowell. It was love at first sight. He called her Doe because of her deer-like eyes, and they soon married. Doe Avedon, who has died aged 86, was the first muse of the man who was to become America's leading fashion and portrait photographer.

Richard Avedon, who had begun to get work as a photographer for the fashion magazine Harper's Bazaar, made his wife into a top model, against her own inclinations. Although Doe gradually backed out of the limelight as a model – one of the last photos Richard took of her was posing in a fur-lined Christian Dior coat and hat at »

- Ronald Bergan

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Doe Avedon obituary

26 December 2011 4:05 PM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Model and movie star whose life story was the inspiration behind the film Funny Face

In 1944, the 21-year-old Richard Avedon, just starting out as a professional photographer after leaving the Us merchant marine, walked into a bank in Manhattan, New York, and saw a 19-year-old clerk called Dorcas Nowell. It was love at first sight. He called her Doe because of her deer-like eyes, and they soon married. Doe Avedon, who has died aged 86, was the first muse of the man who was to become America's leading fashion and portrait photographer.

Richard Avedon, who had begun to get work as a photographer for the fashion magazine Harper's Bazaar, made his wife into a top model, against her own inclinations. Although Doe gradually backed out of the limelight as a model – one of the last photos Richard took of her was posing in a fur-lined Christian Dior coat and hat at »

- Ronald Bergan

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Daily Briefing. Cahiers du Cinema in English 11

25 December 2011 4:28 AM, PST | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Happy holidays indeed: Letter to Jane editor Tim Moore presents his last copy of Cahiers du Cinema in English (you may remember a couple of others). Number 11, from September 1967, features "Orson Welles and Jack Falstaff," a dossier with an interview with Welles and contributions from Serge Daney and others, plus articles on Ingmar Bergman, Robert Bresson, Luis Buñuel and more — and editor Andrew Sarris publishes stills Curtis Harrington sent to him from the set of Games (1967).

Lists. For the Wall Street Journal's Joe Morgenstern, Asghar Farhadi's A Separation is the best film of 2011; the Oklahoma Film Critics Circle goes for Michel Hazanavicius's The Artist.

Obits. "Doe Avedon, a bookish beauty reluctantly transformed into a high-fashion model at the hands of a visionary photographer, Richard Avedon — a story that inspired the 1957 musical Funny Face, about a bookish beauty (Audrey Hepburn) reluctantly transformed into a high-fashion model at the hands »

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Doe Avedon Dead: Model, Actress and 'Funny Face' Inspiration Dies at 86

23 December 2011 2:00 AM, PST | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

Filed under: Movie News

If the story of Dorcas Nowell -- and her rise from a Long Island office worker in the 1940s to a famous fashion model and celebrity -- sounds like a Hollywood production, that's because it actually was: Dorcas, a part-time model, caught the eye of famed fashion photographer Richard Avedon, changed her name to Doe Avedon after marriage, and their whirlwind romance wound up being the basis of 'Funny Face,' the 1957 film with Audrey Hepburn and Fred Astaire. Doe Avedon passed away on Sunday at the age of 86, following complications from pneumonia.

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- Christopher Rosen

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Doe Avedon Dies: Inspired Audrey Hepburn Character in Funny Face, Married to Don Siegel (Dirty Harry)

21 December 2011 12:14 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Model and actress Doe Avedon Siegel, best known for her marriages to photographer Richard Avedon and to Dirty Harry movie director Don Siegel, died Sunday in Los Angeles. She was 86. Born Dorcas Nowell (on April 7, 1928) in Westbury, New York, she was discovered by Avedon, who married her in 1944. (Avedon herself told journalists she began her acting career while working as a waitress.) A highly romanticized version of their courtship was turned into a would-be play by Leonard Gershe, Funny Face, which finally was produced as a Paramount musical in 1957, starring Fred Astaire and Audrey Hepburn under the direction of Stanley Donen. By then, the Avedons had been divorced for six years. Doe Avedon's stage debut took place in 1948, in the Broadway production of N. Richard Nash's The Young and Fair, which also featured Julie Harris, Rita Gam, and future Oscar winner Mercedes McCambridge. For her efforts, Avedon was »

- Andre Soares

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Doe Avedon Siegel Dead At 86

21 December 2011 4:01 AM, PST | WENN | See recent WENN news »

Actress Doe Avedon Siegel has died at the age of 86.

The veteran star passed away on Sunday in Los Angeles, according to Variety.

Avedon Siegel was married to actor Dan Mathews, photographer Richard Avedon and later to Dirty Harry director Don Siegel, with whom she adopted four children before their divorce.

While she was married to Avedon, the couple's friend - playwright/screenwriter Leonard Gershe - based his popular musical Funny Face loosely on their relationship.

Avedon Siegel started her career on Broadway, touring with Mae West, before going on to star in films such as The High and the Mighty with John Wayne and Stanley Donen's Deep in My Heart.

Her TV roles included appearances in Big Town, The Ford Television Theatre and Climax!, and her last big screen appearance came in John Cassavetes' 1984 film, Love Streams. »

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Chloë Moretz: 'I'm not cussing and killing people – I'm normal'

1 December 2011 4:06 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

From kicking ass and drinking blood to making kids movies with Martin Scorsese, Chloë Moretz tells Cath Clarke why she's excited to shoot a film she can finally legally buy a ticket to see

'I mean, nothing really happens in your life until you're 14 or 15. And even then you're still a child." Chloë Moretz is thinking back to how she made sense of her character in Let Me In – a centuries-old, pint-sized, preteen vampire. Nothing happens – until you're 15? That's not exactly how life as 14-year-old Moretz has lived it. Take Monday night: she was at the Royal Film Performance of Hugo, Martin Scorsese's children's adventure (yes, really). She met Prince Charles, and pictures show her co-star in the film, Asa Butterfield – also 14: Moretz is older by a month – standing beside her, nervy in his stiff, grownup tux. But not Chloë (or Chloë Grace, as she currently prefers to »

- Cath Clarke

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Martin Scorsese gave homework to the cast of 'Hugo'

23 November 2011 3:38 PM, PST | EW - Inside Movies | See recent EW.com - Inside Movies news »

Martin Scorsese is a bit of a living, breathing encyclopedia of cinema and his latest film Hugo is, among other things, a loving paean to the pioneers of the medium. So it should be no surprise that the director used films from an earlier era to help demonstrate to his cast exactly what he was going for.

Sir Ben Kingsley plays Georges Méliès, the former magician who, around the turn of the century, became one of the most important innovators of early moviemaking with special effects-heavy delights like A Trip to the Moon and The Impossible Voyage. Hugo is set in the 1930s, »

- Keith Staskiewicz

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MGM musicals: All singing, all dancing

10 November 2011 4:06 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

MGM meant musicals for more than a decade after the second world war. David Thomson looks at a time when a little cheer at the movies was appreciated – and wonders if the same couldn't be said now

There had been musicals before. In the 1930s, as soon as sound permitted, Warner Brothers developed what we call the Busby Berkeley pictures: they were black and white, and often aware of the harsh Depression times, but a choreographic lather of girls and fluid, orgasmic forms where the camera was itching to plunge into the centre of the "big O" – think of Footlight Parade, Gold Diggers of 1933 or 42nd Street. They had aerial shots of waves and whirlpools of chorus girls, opening and closing their legs in time with our desire. A few years later, at Rko Pictures, the Astaire-Rogers films came into being – where the gravity, beauty, and exhilaration of the »

- David Thomson

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Instant Reaction: What's Your Favorite Film Reference From Beyonce's 'Countdown' Video?

6 October 2011 5:05 PM, PDT | MTV Newsroom | See recent MTV Newsroom news »

The video for Beyonce's hot new single "Countdown" just dropped and we're crazy in love with it!

In the clip, King Bey references a ton of dance-heavy, old-school films, from "Funny Face" to "Fame" and "Flashdance." There are "West Side Story"-style snaps and she even seems to briefly wink at her own hit flick, "Dreamgirls."

Do you love the video? What's your favorite reference Beyonce makes in the clip? Vote in our polls after the jump.

»

- John Mitchell

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Watch: Beyonce teases us with tasty preview of 'Countdown' video

4 October 2011 7:27 AM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Beyonce pays homage to Audrey Hepburn and other icons in a new 30-second teaser for her “Countdown” video. We won’t get to see the full clip until it premieres on Thursday, Oct. 6, but until then, you can stimulate you eyeballs with her fetching black turtleneck/cropped back pants style, straight out of Hepburn’s “ Funny Face,” as well as be bedazzled by the pop art of multiple Beyonces in bathing suits.  She looks beautiful throughout, whether she’s rocking Hepburn’s pixie cut or pushing the ‘60s mod look. [More after the jump...] The video for “Countdown,” one of the more infectious songs »

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Culture flash: catwalks

21 September 2011 4:05 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

This week's news in the arts

London Fashion Week drew to a close yesterday, leaving us with only memories and a thousand photographs. But while fashion and photography have long been soul mates, the catwalk has also made a strong showing across film, music and literature – well beyond Naomi Campbell's classic Swan, and Lauren Weisenberg's seminal The Devil Wears Prada. Eighties sparring partners Bret Easton Ellis and Jay McInerney covered the territory with Glamorama (1998) and Model Behaviour (2007) respectively. A portrait of the empty world of the catwalk, Easton Ellis's anti-hero keeps himself entertained by joining a male model terrorist group.

In fact, the model caught up in world events is a recurring theme. As Zoolander's Derek Zoolander says: "I'm pretty sure there's a lot more to life than being really, really, ridiculously good-looking." It turns out that more is saving the world from the evil Mugatu during the course of a fashion show. »

- Lauren Cochrane

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The Devil's Double and more movies on the megalomaniacal

8 August 2011 1:21 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Dominic Cooper's double performance as Uday Hussein and his stand-in means that more dictator flicks are guaranteed

The funniest thing I ever read about Uday and Qusay Hussein was that the guy who betrayed their final hideout was also the host who'd catered to their every iron whim – and that he finally grassed them up because they were obnoxious, demanding, entitled little brats.

To the last, it would seem, judging by The Devil's Double, which offers us a factually supercharged account of the toxic and violent relationship between Uday, Saddam's psychotic elder son, and his press-ganged doppelganger Latif Yahia. They're both played by Dominic Cooper in a batty, star-making double performance that is far more fun than the movie haphazardly slung around it.

Uday's a handful, living out some Baathist-inflected fantasia on De Palma's Scarface, shooting off guns indoors, plucking schoolgirls off the streets and raping them, exercising Caligulan »

- John Patterson

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Hot Rods & Droids: A George Lucas Profile (Part 1)

15 June 2011 12:06 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Trevor Hogg profiles the career of legendary filmmaker George Lucas in the first of a six part feature...

“I was as normal as you can get,” stated American filmmaker George Lucas when reflecting upon his childhood. “I wanted a car and hated school. I was a poor student. I lived for summer vacations and got into trouble a lot shooting out windows with my Bb gun.” The California native was not initially drawn to the medium which would bring him fame and fortune. “Modesto was a small town, and there were only a couple of theatres. When I went to the movies I really didn’t pay much attention. I was usually looking for girls or to goof off.” George Lucas, Senior owned a stationary store where he sold office supplies and equipment to support his son, three daughters, and frequently invalid wife. “He was conservative, and I’m very conservative, »

- flickeringmyth

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10 of the best films set in Paris

3 June 2011 5:00 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

From a masterpiece of film noir to classic Gene Kelly musical An American in Paris, French film critic Agnès Poirier chooses her favourite sets in the city

As featured in our Paris city guide

Les Enfants du Paradis, Marcel Carné, 1943-45

Penned by poet Jacques Prévert and featuring the enigmatic Arletty, dashing Pierre Brasseur and melancholic Jean-Louis Barrault, Les Enfants du Paradis takes place in Paris in the 1840s and tells the story of the contrarian love of Garance and Baptiste. One key scene takes place in the boulevard du Temple, known at the time as boulevard du Crime. "You smiled at me! Don't deny it, you smiled at me. Ah, life's beautiful and so are you. And now, I shall never leave your side. Where are we going? What! We've only been together for two minutes and already you want to leave me. When will I see you again? »

- Agnès Poirier

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Top Ten Tuesday: The Best of Roger Corman

18 May 2011 7:28 AM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Article by Jim Batts, Dana Jung, and Tom Stockman

Celebrated producer and director Roger Corman will be in St. Louis this weekend to help kick off the Vincentennial Vincent Price Film Festival. We Are Movie Geeks has decided to take a look at the directing career of the man known as .King of the B.s’, a Hollywood legend who.s discovered so much talent and gave so many future directors and actors their starts, that he has to be considered a one-man movie industry. Since we just posted the Top Ten Best of Vincent Price last week and included three of the eight Corman/Price collaborations in that list, we decided to leave off the films he made with Price this week and focus on other films that he directed. Roger Corman will be at the Hi-Pointe Theater at 1005 McCausland Ave. in St. Louis on Saturday May 21 to speak »

- Movie Geeks

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Clip joint: makeovers

2 March 2011 9:01 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Take off those big glasses and open your eyes to cinema's most significant spruce-ups

When a makeover is the star of the show, the movie isn't usually up to much. Although the "makeover movie" has given us some classic guilty pleasures in Mean Girls, Clueless, and Pretty Woman, some excellent films like Now, Voyager, and certainly kept Audrey Hepburn busy (Sabrina, Funny Face, My Fair Lady), it's also got a lot to answer for. A lot to answer for.

Generally, makeover movies inspire about as much indifference as Marmite. Though some people love their sense of fun, others find them dull, predictable and sexist. It doesn't help that the makeover is often so laughably superficial, or that the subject is consistently a nice-but-lonely woman obsessed with getting her man.

Though marketed squarely at women, too often the message of the makeover movie is riddled with implicit criticisms of its audience, »

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MovieRetriever's 100 Greatest Movies: #6 Singin' in the Rain

18 February 2011 8:54 AM, PST | CinemaNerdz | See recent CinemaNerdz news »

Feb 18, 2011

Traditionally, the film musical is said to have reached its pinnacle in the 1950s at MGM studios. The creative personnel at MGM responsible for this perfection were Arthur Freed, Vincente Minnelli, Stanley Donen and Gene Kelly. The "golden era" began with On the Town (1949) and ended with Gigi (1958); between were An American in Paris, Singin' in the Rain, The Bandwagon, Seven Brides for Seven Brothers, It's Always Fair Weather, and Funny Face. With the exception of On the Town, all were originally conceived for the screen. They were, in a sense, the ...Read more at MovieRetriever.com »

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Five Insanely Romantic Fred Astaire Dances

14 February 2011 12:44 PM, PST | ifc.com | See recent IFC news »

Call me old-fashioned, call me an insanely committed movie dork; hell, call me an insanely committed, old-fashioned movie dork but there's nothing I like better on Valentine's Day than a quiet night in with my wife, a home-cooked meal and great old films. Our favorites are the classic MGM musicals. You can't go wrong with Gene Kelly, of course, but I think Valentine's Day belongs to Fred Astaire, who produced many of his best onscreen moments with a woman at his side. The air of romance in Astaire's best films is so thick it's beyond intoxicating: it's positively infectious. Here are five of his most insanely romantic dance numbers.

"I'll Be Hard to Handle"

From "Roberta" (1935)

Featuring Astaire and Ginger Rogers

The first image we think of when we think of Astaire is the elegant gentleman in top hat and tails, squiring Ginger Rogers to some impossibly lavish Depression-era ball. »

- Matt Singer

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Audrey Hepburn: an iconic problem

20 January 2011 1:30 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Audrey Hepburn had an extraordinary, traumatic childhood and was a great actor, but never achieved all she could have. Alex Cox profiles a singular star

It used to be said that you can't be too rich or too thin. We now no longer believe this. Bankers and hedge fund managers are too rich; and now the celebrity magazines and tabloids lead the choruses of "Look how skinny's she's got!" The nicer way of saying the same thing, and making it a compliment, is to call the person elegant.

Audrey Hepburn came to be synonymous with this form of elegance. Even in her early films, her height, her skinniness and her wistfulness combined to get her noticed. In the unhelpful role of Chiquita in The Lavender Hill Mob, she attracts the attention both of Alec Guinness and of the camera: a woman visually striking and possessed of a certain quality of unhappiness. »

- Alex Cox

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