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Tab Hunter Confidential

What's the right thing to say about a closeted movie career in an industry that feeds on gossip? There's plenty to say, if you're Tab Hunter. The '50s heartthrob breaks his silence with a remarkably candid and positive account of his astonishing, unique Hollywood experience. Tab Hunter Confidential Blu-ray FilmRise 2015 / Color / 1:78 widescreen / 90 min. / Street Date August 23, 2016 / 19.95 Starring Tab Hunter, Allan Glaser, Clint Eastwood, Connie Stevens, Portia de Rossi, Robert Wagner, Debbie Reynolds, Lainie Kazan, George Takei, Noah Wyle, John Waters, Liz Torres, Tab Hunter, Dolores Hart, Terry Moore, Don Murray, Robert Osborne, Darryl Hickman, William Wellman Jr., Rae Allen, Rona Barrett, Venetia Stevenson, Rex Reed, Etchika Choureau, Marilyn Erskine, Henry Willson, Shannon Bolin, Eddie Muller, Ronnie Robertson, Gary Giddins, Tamara Asseyev, Neal Noorlag, Marilyn Gevirtz, Jo-An Cox Bunton, Lou Simon, Evelyn Kramer. Cinematography Nancy Schreiber Film Editor Jeffrey Schwarz Original Music Michael Cudahy Produced by Allan Glaser, Neil Koenigsberg,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Best Baseball Movies

In the midst of March Madness and with the Kentucky Derby around the corner, the first pitch of baseball season is almost here.

A quote from Field Of Dreams best describes America’s national pastime, “The one constant throughout the years has been baseball.”

To mark the start of the 2016 season, here’s our list of the Best Baseball movies.

The Bad News Bears

Considered by some to be the best baseball movie ever, the film celebrates its 40th anniversary this month (April 7, 1976). In an article from the NY Daily News, one line reads, “It is a movie that someone like the late Philip Seymour Hoffman called his favorite, and one which resonates on many levels today, with all different generations.”

Who are we to argue with greatness?

After skewering all-American subjects such as politics (The Candidate) and beauty pageants (Smile), director Michael Ritchie naturally set his sights on the
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Rescheduled! – Tab Hunter Confidential – The QFest St. Louis Review

Tab Hunter Confidential now screens Monday, April 27th at 7pm at Landmark’s Tivoli Theater (6350 Delmar) as part of this year’s QFest St. Louis. For ticket information, go Here

Hollywood can destroy people. For every survivor of the Hollywood system, whether from years ago or any current actors, there are dozens of actors and other artists who crashed and burned, had serious substance abuse issues, committed suicide or never made it at all.

Just from memory I can name Barbara Payton, Jayne Mansfield, Jeanne Eagles, Marilyn Monroe, James Dean, Diana Sands and Montgomery Clift. For a complete rundown you can’t do much better than Kenneth Anger’s incredible book Hollywood Babylon and it’s even more depressing sequel Hollywood Babylon Part Two. Vincent Price called Hollywood “the most evil place on Earth!” And Vincent Price would know something about evil!

A few short years ago I read Tab Hunter
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Tab Hunter Confidential – The QFest St. Louis Review

Tab Hunter Confidential screens Monday, April 20th at 7pm at Landmark’s Tivoli Theater (6350 Delmar) as part if this year’s QFest St. Louis. For ticket information, go Here

Hollywood can destroy people. For every survivor of the Hollywood system, whether from years ago or any current actors, there are dozens of actors and other artists who crashed and burned, had serious substance abuse issues, committed suicide or never made it at all.

Just from memory I can name Barbara Payton, Jayne Mansfield, Jeanne Eagles, Marilyn Monroe, James Dean, Diana Sands and Montgomery Clift. For a complete rundown you can’t do much better than Kenneth Anger’s incredible book Hollywood Babylon and it’s even more depressing sequel Hollywood Babylon Part Two. Vincent Price called Hollywood “the most evil place on Earth!” And Vincent Price would know something about evil!

A few short years ago I read Tab Hunter
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

It’s Opening Week: Best Baseball Movies

Is this heaven? Nope, it’s Opening Week.

Recently Mlb rounded up a group of players to recite, word for word, James Earl Jones’ famous “people will come, Ray” speech from Field Of Dreams.

Wamg declares America’s national pastime, Baseball, to be the official sport of movie fans everywhere. As Brad Pitt said in Moneyball, “How can you not be romantic about Baseball?”

It all started Sunday night with the Cardinals at the Cubs with St. Louis winning 3 to 0.

To celebrate the first pitch of Opening Week, here’s our list of the best Baseball movies.

The Rookie

One of the best baseball biopics to come along over the years, The Rookie, starring Dennis Quaid, tells the true story of Jim Morris, a man who finally gets a shot at his lifelong dream-pitching in the big leagues. A high school science teacher/baseball coach, Morris’ players make a bet with him:if they win district,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

The 101 Best Sports Movies of All Time

A quarter-century ago, Kevin Costner hit a double-play, following up "Bull Durham" with "Field of Dreams" and becoming king of the sports movie. Twenty-five years later, as "Field of Dreams" marks its 25th anniversary (it was released on April 21, 1989), Costner is back with "Draft Day." The movie's about football, not baseball, and Costner's character plays in the executive suite, not on the field, but his mere presence still offers a reminder of great sports movies past.

And after all, isn't nostalgia a key element of sports movies? "Field of Dreams" makes this explicit -- we long for the sports heroes of our childhood, for a supposed long-gone golden age of our preferred sport, as a way of connecting with our past and bridging the generational divide that separates us as adults from our parents. Sports movies offer more than just the drama of winners and losers, or the journey from dream to achievement,
See full article at Moviefone »

The 5 Non-"Psycho" Anthony Perkins Movies You Need To See

Anthony Perkins in Goodbye Again

Happy birthday to the man I call my Time Machine Husband (Tm), Anthony Perkins. The effete, beautiful actor best known for his astonishing performance as Norman Bates in Psycho would've been 81 today, and without even reading Charles Winecoff's gripping biography Split Image, you can tell in Mr. Perkins' performances that he was enigmatic, complicated, and conflicted. Though Perkins died of AIDS in 1992, his silver screenlegacy endures thanks to his lengthy, strange filmography.

Hollywood wanted Perkins to be the next James Dean, but his vulnerability and (frankly) apparent gayness stood at odds with that demand. As I like to say, we can't rewrite cinematic history to include all the wonderful gay characters we deserve, so we as gay entertainment anthropologists have to find our stories in the nuances, innuendos, and otherwise untold stories hidden right onscreen (perhaps unintentionally), right within all the stated heterosexuality. Though
See full article at The Backlot »

Best Baseball Movies To See Before The World Series

“The one constant through all the years, Ray, has been baseball. America has rolled by like an army of steamrollers. It has been erased like a blackboard, rebuilt and erased again. But baseball has marked the time. This field, this game: it’s a part of our past, Ray. It reminds us of all that once was good and it could be again.” – Field Of Dreams.

No truer words were ever spoken about America’s Pastime. Baseball began this past Spring with 30 teams vying for the chance to become World Champions and now it’s been decided. The San Francisco Giants and Detroit Tigers will play ball in the 2012 World Series. Before the final hurrah of nine innings, stats, bases and 3 strikes you’re out, Wamg has compiled a list of the Best Baseball Movies. Did we leave any in the dugout or are there some that should be sent to the showers?
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

DGA Awards vs. Academy Awards: Odd Men Out Jack Clayton, David Lean, Stanley Donen

Katharine Hepburn, Rossano Brazzi in Oscar nominee (but not DGA nominee) David Lean's Summertime DGA Awards vs. Academy Awards 1948-1952: Odd Men Out George Cukor, John Huston, Vincente Minnelli 1953 DGA (12) Melvin Frank and Norman Panama, Above and Beyond Walter Lang, Call Me Madam Daniel Mann, Come Back, Little Sheba Joseph L. Mankiewicz, Julius Caesar Henry Koster, The Robe Jean Negulesco, Titanic George Sidney, Young Bess DGA/AMPAS George Stevens, Shane Charles Walters, Lili Billy Wilder, Stalag 17 William Wyler, Roman Holiday Fred Zinnemann, From Here to Eternity   1954 DGA (16) Edward Dmytryk, The Caine Mutiny Alfred Hitchcock, Dial M for Murder Robert Wise, Executive Suite Anthony Mann, The Glenn Miller Story Samuel Fuller, Hell and High Water Henry King, King of Khyber Rifles Melvin Frank and Norman Panama, Knock on Wood Don Siegel, Riot in Cell Block 11 Stanley Donen, Seven Brides for Seven Brothers George Cukor, A Star Is Born Jean Negulesco,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Friday Box Office: Courageous Leads Newcomers, But It's No Moneyball

Friday Box Office: Courageous Leads Newcomers, But It's No Moneyball
Moneyball rose to the top of the leaderboard on Friday's box office tally, which is no surprise. It's baseballing time. You should be re-watching Pride of the Yankees, Fear Strikes Out, and Field of Dreams by now. Further on down the rankings, newcomers Courageous, 50/50, Dream House, and What's Your Number finish comparably, with the low-budget Courageous and 50/50 showing the most potential. Full listings after the jump.
See full article at Movieline »

The Top Ten Baseball Movies of All-Time

Moneyball is one of the year's most anticipated films and it will be hitting theaters this Friday. Starring Brad Pitt as Billy Beane, the general manager of the Oakland A's who lead a team of castoffs to the American League playoffs back in 2003, the film is based on Michael Lewis' ("The Blind Side") bestselling book of the same name, and has been mentioned for awards season kudos.

The film debuted in Toronto at the beginning of this month where it didn't cement it as the Oscar frontrunner, but it didn't knock it out of contention either. Most of the reviews coming out of the festival were positive to glowing including Brad's take on the film (read that here) when he saw it on the first day of the fest.

Hollywood hasn't made that many baseball movies over the years but the ones they have made have often been terrific. Here,
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

Party Favors: Boxing Kovacs

  • Quick Stop
Yonkers - Ernie Kovacs is the patron saint of innovative TV comedies. His impact can be felt on everything from Rowan & Martin’s Laugh-In to Monty Python’s Flying Circus to Saturday Night Live. Shout! Factory’s The Ernie Kovacs Collection gives a survey of his short yet stellar career that ended in 1962 with his death. Over the course of six DVDs, you realize this guy truly revolutionized what you could do on TV.

The boxset doesn’t have any of the episodes from his original Three to Get Ready show that aired on Philly TV. But we get a healthy helping of his other shows that allowed him to bounce between NBC, CBS, ABC and even the legendary DuMont. Along with creating comedy shows, he hosted talkshows, gameshows and even variety shows. He even contributed to Mad Magazine. His famous mustache and cigar popped up all over the dial.
See full article at Quick Stop »

70s Rewind: The Parallax View

Weirder, wilder, and more unruly than I remember, The Parallax View (1974), remains a deeply paranoid conspiracy drama. Directed by Alan J. Pakula, the film feels like a dry run for All the President's Men, which Pakula made two years later.Pakula began as a producer, working with director Robert Mulligan, for 1957's Fear Strikes Out, a character drama starring Anthony Perkins as a baseball player, followed by To Kill a Mockingbird, Love with the Proper Stranger, Baby the Rain Must Fall, Inside Daisy Clover, Up the Down Staircase, and The Stalking Moon; most are respectable dramas (the last was an odd little Western) during a fairly bleak and dry period in American cinema. Finally, Pakula got behind the camera as a director at the age...
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

30 Greatest Gay Actors: #20: Anthony Perkins

Anthony Perkins made his film debut in The Actress (1953) in which he received the Golden Globe Award for New Star of the Year and three years later he received an an Academy Award nomination for his second film, Friendly Persuasion (1956). Although Perkins specialized in playing many awkward young men, notably in Fear Strikes Out (1957), The Tin Star (1957), and Desire Under the Elms (1958), he will always be known best for his role as Norman Bates in Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho.

The actor also went on to create a critically-acclaimed portrayal of Joseph K. in Orson WellesThe Trial (1962) a cinematic adaptation of the novel by Franz Kafka, and in 1968 he took the role of a disturbed young murderer in Pretty Poison (1968), which served to affect the rest of his career. He would later find himself typecast, starring in the sequels and prequel to Psycho, including Psycho II, Psycho III (which he
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Karl Malden (1912 - 2009)

Academy Award winner and Hollywood legend Karl Malden died yesterday at the age of 97 of natural causes. He has had one of the longest and most successful careers of any American actor and starred in some of the most Iconic films of all time (On the Waterfront, A Streetcar Named Desire, The Birdman of Alcatraz, Patton) and starred in the 1970s TV drama The Streets of San Francisco. But what made Malden a house hold name were the American Express commercials he made in the 70s and 80s with the catchphrase “Don’t leave home without it.” Born Mladen Sekulovich on March 22, 1912 in Chicago, he was the son of a Serbian father and a Czech mother. His father was a steelworker and as a young man Malden took up the profession for a few years. He began acting in high school and in 1937 moved to New York to try his hand on Broadway.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Robert Mulligan Dead At Age 83; Directed "To Kill A Mockingbird"

  • CinemaRetro
Director Robert Mulligan, beloved by actors for his low-key style and temperament behind the camera, has passed away at age 83. Mulligan began directing in live TV productions in the 1950s but graduated to feature films with the acclaimed production of Fear Strikes Out. His career highlight was helming the 1962 classic screen adaptation of To Kill a Mockingbird for which he was nominated for an Oscar. Under his direction, star Gregory Peck won the Best Actor Academy Award for his immortal performance as Atticus Finch in the film. Mulligan never directed blockbuster hits, but several of his productions proved to be extremely popular with audiences and critics. Among them: Come September, Love With the Proper Stranger, Baby, The Rain Must Fall  (the latter two starring Steve McQueen), Up the Down Staircase, Summer of '42 and the bittersweet comedy Same Time, Next Year.  However, some of his best work remained under-rated, including
See full article at CinemaRetro »

To Kill a Mockingbird Director Dead

He wasn't a household name, but Robert Mulligan crafted what is undeniably one of the greatest films of all time: To Kill a Mockingbird. The filmmaker, who received an Oscar nomination for helming the classic 1962 adaptation of the Harper Lee novel, died of heart disease Friday at his Connecticut home. He was 83. The workman-like Mulligan was known as an actor's director, guiding Gregory Peck to an Oscar as Mockingbird's iconic Atticus Finch and working with the likes of Robert Redford, Natalie Wood, Anthony Perkins, Ellen Burstyn and Richard Gere. His credits also included Fear Strikes Out, Inside Daisy Clover, Love With the Proper Stranger, Summer of '42 and Same Time, Next Year, but...
See full article at E! Online »

Mockingbird Director Dies

Robert Mulligan, the Oscar-nominated director of To Kill A Mockingbird, has died of heart disease at his home in Connecticut aged 83. The Bronx-born director began his career in the fast-evolving world of live TV working at CBS in the so-called Golden Age of Television of the early 50s. In New York he worked alongside young TV directors like George Roy Hill, Sydney Pollack, Robert Altman and John Frankenheimer, before launching his filmmaking career with 1957 baseball drama Fear Strikes Out.Mulligan went on to direct more than 20 films, but will be best remembered for his 1963 screen adaptation of Harper Lee’s Pulitzer-winning novel To Kill A Mockingbird. Coaxing arguably Gregory Peck’s finest performance from him as attorney Atticus Finch, Mulligan delivered an eloquent, humanist assault on the prejudices of the Deep South, proving to be the perfect choice to choice to bring Lee’s masterpiece to the screen.Mulligan was
See full article at EmpireOnline »

Mockingbird Director Mulligan Dies

  • WENN
Mockingbird Director Mulligan Dies
To Kill A Mockingbird director Robert Mulligan has died at the age of 83.

The moviemaker, who received an Oscar nomination for helming the 1962 drama, passed away at his Connecticut home on Friday after suffering a heart attack.

Mulligan began his career working on live TV in New York in the early 1950s before graduating to movies in 1957 with Fear Strikes Out, the story of baseball pitcher Jimmy Piersall.

He went on to direct over 20 pictures including 1978's Bloodbrothers and 1991's The Man in the Moon, the film debut of Hollywood actress Reese Witherspoon.

Robert Mulligan dies at 83

Robert Mulligan dies at 83
Robert Mulligan, who directed "To Kill a Mockingbird" and "Summer of '42," among other films, died Friday of heart disease at his Connecticut home. He was 83.

Mulligan received a best director Oscar nomination in 1963 for "Mockingbird."

The brother of actor Richard Mulligan, he also directed "The Great Impostor," "Love With the Proper Stranger," "Baby, the Rain Must Fall," "Inside Daisy Clover," "Up the Down Staircase" and "The Other." He also narrated "Summer of '42."

Known for his diffident nature and sensitivity toward players, Mulligan directed five different actors in Oscar-nominated performances: Gregory Peck, Mary Badham, Natalie Wood, Ruth Gordon and Ellen Burstyn, with Peck winning the best actor Oscar for "Mockingbird."

He also elicited consistently fine performances from a range of his players, including Anthony Perkins in "Fear Strikes Out," Jennifer O'Neill in "Summer of '42," Robert Redford in "Inside Daisy Clover" and Richard Gere in "Bloodbrothers."

Mulligan earned his
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

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