The Curse of Frankenstein
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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2007

4 items from 2016


Nicolas Winding Refn Reveals Seven Surprising Film Inspirations: ‘La Dolce Vita,’ ‘Cloverfield’ & More

27 June 2016 7:48 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Nicolas Winding Refn has made a provocative career out of blending the avant grade with traditional genre elements (see his latest shocker “The Neon Demon” for proof), and given the following seven films on his list of cinematic inspirations, this speciality of his somehow all makes sense. As part of his current publicity tour for the Elle Fanning-starring horror film, Refn has partnered with online streaming service Mubi to curate a season’s worth of titles based on the movies that have inspired and excited him most.

Read More: Here Are 12 of Nicolas Winding Refn’s Most Provocative Statements

Refn has always been an outspoken fan of Federico Fellini and giallo master Dario Aregnto, so seeing films like “La Dolce Vita” and “Suspiria” on his list shouldn’t come as much of a surprise, especially since the latter seems to have been a major influence on “The Neon Demon. »

- Zack Sharf

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Hammer’s Dracula Cycle: A Critical Look

9 June 2016 5:23 PM, PDT | shocktillyoudrop.com | See recent shocktillyoudrop news »

Shock takes a brief, critical look at Hammer’s original 9-picture Dracula film series. When England’s Hammer Studios invested some of their capital and produced 1957’s full-color, full-blooded, adult-geared riff on the classic Universal horror film with Terrence Fisher’s The Curse Of Frankenstein, they changed the way we watch horror movies. Filled with sadism, cruelty, sexuality…

The post Hammer’s Dracula Cycle: A Critical Look appeared first on Shock Till You Drop. »

- Chris Alexander

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The Black Sleep

23 February 2016 10:33 AM, PST | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

It's an All Star monster rally -- Lon Chaney Jr.!, John Carradine!, Bela Lugosi!, Basil Rathbone!, Tor Johnson! -- with Akim Tamiroff in there pitching as well. It's considered a must-see picture, and this HD presentation is nothing to sniff at. Added bonus: a Tom Weaver commentary. The Black Sleep Blu-ray Kl Studio Classics 1956 / B&W / 1:85 widescreen / 82 min. / Dr. Cadman's Secret / Street Date March 22, 2016 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95 Starring Basil Rathbone, Akim Tamiroff, Lon Chaney Jr., John Carradine, Bela Lugosi, Herbert Rudley, Patricia Blake, Phyllis Stanley, Tor Johnson, Sally Yarnell, George Sawaya. Cinematography Gordon Avil Film Editor John F. Schreyer Original Music Les Baxter Written by John C. Higgins, Gerald Drayson Adams Produced by Howard W. Koch Directed by Reginald Le Borg

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Older monster kids know that the 1956 chiller The Black Sleep existed for years only through stills in Famous Monsters magazine. We saw tantalizing »

- Glenn Erickson

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12 British Horror Films You Need To See

8 February 2016 12:30 PM, PST | Obsessed with Film | See recent Obsessed with Film news »

Fox Searchlight Pictures

Prior to the 1950s, British horror consisted mainly of Tod Slaughter melodramas and the occasional vehicle for Boris Karloff or Bela Lugosi. A pair of truly notable films – Alfred Hitchcock’s The Lodger (1926) and Dead Of Night (1945) – broke the mould, but the genre met with disapproval from the UK censor, who banned Freaks and Island Of Lost Souls (both 1932) for decades.

The change came when Hammer released The Curse Of Frankenstein in 1957, which gave punters a home-grown monster movie with unprecedented levels of gore. The film played to packed houses and as Hammer’s success continued, rival studios sprung up and their output made it very clear that there was much more to British horror than watching Christopher Lee and Peter Cushing putter around a gothic castle.

From anthology films to zombie movies, there’s a certain consistency to horror pictures from the UK, an atmosphere and »

- Ian Watson

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2007

4 items from 2016


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