IMDb > The Curse of Frankenstein (1957)
The Curse of Frankenstein
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guidemessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

The Curse of Frankenstein (1957) More at IMDbPro »

Photos (See all 13 | slideshow) Videos
The Curse of Frankenstein -- The Frankenstein epic finds Baron Victor Frankenstein in jail, attempting to convince his jailers that a monster he created was responsible for the crimes for which he is accused.


User Rating:
7.2/10   5,756 votes »
Your Rating:
Saving vote...
Deleting vote...
/10   (delete | history)
Sorry, there was a problem
MOVIEmeter: ?
Up 5% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Jimmy Sangster (screenplay)
Mary Shelley (based on the classic story by)
View company contact information for The Curse of Frankenstein on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
25 June 1957 (USA) See more »
Not recommended for people of nervous disposition See more »
Victor Frankenstein builds a creature and brings it to life. But his creature behaves not as he intended. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
(153 articles)
User Reviews:
Curse viewed through the lens of tens of other Frankenstein films See more (87 total) »


  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Peter Cushing ... Victor Frankenstein

Hazel Court ... Elizabeth
Robert Urquhart ... Paul Krempe

Christopher Lee ... the Creature / Creature
Melvyn Hayes ... Young Victor
Valerie Gaunt ... Justine
Paul Hardtmuth ... Professor Bernstein
Noel Hood ... Aunt
Fred Johnson ... Grandpa
Claude Kingston ... Little Boy
Alex Gallier ... Priest
Michael Mulcaster ... Warder
Andrew Leigh ... Burgomaster
Ann Blake ... Wife
Sally Walsh ... Young Elizabeth
Middleton Woods ... Lecturer
Raymond Ray ... Uncle
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Josef Behrmann ... Fritz (uncredited)
Henry Caine ... Schoolmaster (uncredited)
Trevor Davis ... Uncle (uncredited)
Marjorie Hume ... Mother (uncredited)
Ernest Jay ... Undertaker (uncredited)
Eugene Leahy ... 2nd Priest (uncredited)
Bartlett Mullins ... Tramp (uncredited)
Raymond Rollett ... Father Felix (uncredited)

Directed by
Terence Fisher 
Writing credits
Jimmy Sangster (screenplay)

Mary Shelley (based on the classic story by) (as Mary W. Shelley)

Produced by
Michael Carreras .... executive producer
Anthony Hinds .... producer
Anthony Nelson Keys .... associate producer (as Anthony Nelson-Keys)
Max Rosenberg .... producer (uncredited)
Original Music by
James Bernard 
Cinematography by
Jack Asher (director of photography)
Film Editing by
James Needs 
Casting by
Dorothy Holloway (casting)
Production Design by
Bernard Robinson 
Art Direction by
Ted Marshall 
Costume Design by
Molly Arbuthnot (uncredited)
Makeup Department
Philip Leakey .... makeup artist (as Phil Leakey)
Henry Montsash .... hair stylist (as H. Montsash)
Roy Ashton .... assistant makeup artist (uncredited)
George Turner .... assistant makeup artist (uncredited)
Production Management
Don Weeks .... production manager
James Carreras .... executive in charge of production (uncredited)
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Derek Whitehurst .... assistant director
Hugh Harlow .... third assistant director (uncredited)
Jimmy Komisarjevsky .... second assistant director (uncredited)
Art Department
Arthur Banks .... master plasterer (uncredited)
Don Mingaye .... draughtsman (uncredited)
Tom Money .... property master (uncredited)
Fred Ricketts .... construction manager (uncredited)
Sound Department
Jock May .... sound (uncredited)
Jim Perry .... boom operator (uncredited)
Michael Sale .... sound camera operator (uncredited)
Visual Effects by
Les Bowie .... matte painter (uncredited)
Jock Easton .... stunt double: Christopher Lee (uncredited)
Camera and Electrical Department
Len Harris .... camera operator
Steve Birtles .... lighting technician: second unit (uncredited)
Jack Curtis .... chief electrician (uncredited)
Tom Edwards .... still photographer (uncredited)
John Jay .... still photographer (uncredited)
Harold Marland .... electrician (uncredited)
Harry Oakes .... focus puller (uncredited)
Bob Palmer .... electrician (uncredited)
Editorial Department
Roy Norman .... assistant editor (uncredited)
Music Department
John Hollingsworth .... musical director
Other crew
Doreen Soan .... continuity
Faith Frisby .... production secretary (uncredited)
Crew believed to be complete

Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
82 min | Japan:83 min
Color (Eastmancolour)
Aspect Ratio:
1.66 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (RCA Sound Recording)
Australia:M | Brazil:14 | Canada:PG (Ontario) | Finland:K-18 (self applied) (2004) | Finland:(Banned) (1957) | Germany:16 (DVD rating) | Netherlands:16 (video rating) | Netherlands:18 (re-rating) (1958) (original rating: not allowed) (1957) | Sweden:15 | Sweden:(Banned) (1957-1965) | UK:X (original rating) (passed with cuts) | UK:12 (tv rating) | UK:12 (video re-rating) (2003) (2012) | UK:15 (video rating) (1989) | USA:Approved (MPAA rating: certificate #18481) | West Germany:18 (VHS)

Did You Know?

Christopher Lee's niece Harriet Walter later played Mary Wollstonecraft, the mother of "Frankenstein" author Mary Shelley, in Frankenstein: Birth of a Monster (2003) (TV).See more »
Miscellaneous: When Paul Krempe shoots the creature, it clamps its hand to its apparently bleeding face. Watching the scene frame by frame, however, it is clear that the creature's face is unhurt and the actor is simply holding a handful of fake blood (which is dribbling through his fingers even before his hand reaches his face).See more »
Baron Frankenstein:[after his monster has nearly killed him] I did it, Paul!See more »
Movie Connections:


How much sex, violence, and profanity are in this movie?
What is 'The Curse of Frankenstein' about?
Is 'The Curse of Frankenstein' based on a book?
See more »
22 out of 37 people found the following review useful.
Curse viewed through the lens of tens of other Frankenstein films, 17 July 2006
Author: Brandt Sponseller from New York City

It's very difficult for me to judge if my opinion on The Curse of Frankenstein would be higher if I were to watch it coming from a different background/history. This latest viewing I believe is only the second time that I've seen Curse, with the first many, many years ago--so long ago that I could barely remember it. In the meantime, I've watched at least a few times, with relatively recent viewings, everything from Universal's 1931 Frankenstein (as well as their 1935 Bride of Frankenstein and other films in that series) to Flesh for Frankenstein (1973), Young Frankenstein (1974), Mary Shelly's Frankenstein (1994), Frankenhooker (1990)--even Der Golem, wie er in die Welt kam (1920)--and many other Frankenstein or related films. A few of those I've seen at least 10 times over the years.

So I'm coming back to Curse almost as if I'm seeing it for the first time, while already having those films mentioned above as favorites for different aspects of the Frankenstein story, such as atmosphere, visceralness, humor, grandiosity, campiness, and so on. In fact, a number of those films are favorites of all time, period. For me, then, Curse had tough competition on this viewing, and without doing something significantly different with the story, it might fall short.

What Curse probably does better than all of the other Frankenstein films that I've seen is relationship dynamics. At the moment, I'd call Curse the "soap opera" version of the story, which is not really meant as a knock. Here, Victor Frankenstein has lost his father at a very young age--he became Baron at the age of five. The film begins by showing the power and control this young man has over others. He contracts to have a tutor come teach him about science, and together, they begin exploring the scientific basis of life--the "life force" more specifically, which leads to the usual Frankenstein plot elements.

At the same time, however, the focus remains on relationships. We have a complex tutor/student, master/employee, genius/follower relationship between Victor (Peter Cushing) and Paul Krempe (Robert Urquhart), his teacher. Victor is engaged to be married--it's an arranged marriage--to Elizabeth (Hazel Court), his cousin, yet he's in at least a lustful relationship with a housekeeper, Justine (Valerie Gaunt). At the same time, Paul seems to have fallen in love with Elizabeth, and it's ambiguous to what extent she may feel the same towards him. The actual "curse" here seems to be one of difficult/dysfunctional relationships, where everyone is involved in complex power struggles with almost everyone else, and no one quite comes out victorious (ironically enough). All of this stuff is pretty good, if appropriately staid for the Victorian setting (hmmmm . . . lots of occurrences of "victor--"). On the down side, some of the cinematography/lighting veers towards a soap opera look, which doesn't do much for me.

A lot of the usual Frankenstein themes are here, too, but sometimes they almost feel like an afterthought. Christopher Lee, who plays the Frankenstein monster, is severely underused. He remains more in the background throughout the film.

Still, lots of the usual Frankenstein film stuff is done well, if a bit subtly. Keeping the monster's body half immersed in fluid was a good idea--there's a creepiness just to the way it looks and it is also unsettling because you wonder why it's only half-submerged. It seems if it needs to be submerged, the whole body should be, so from the beginning of the experiments, it feels more strongly like something is off about Victor. The more visceral body part scenes (like acquiring the hands and eyes) work very well, especially in context, and Lee's make-up was well done, including the fact that he more strongly suggests both a mummy (because of the bandages) and a zombie--the Frankenstein monster should rightly suggest both. Also, the acting is very good throughout--particularly Cushing's performance.

But for me, as good as Curse is, it pales in comparison to its Frankenstein brethren. It's good, but other films do the various aspects better, except maybe for the relationship stuff, but for me, that's not enough to elevate Curse to the same echelon as many of those other films.

Was the above review useful to you?
See more (87 total) »

Message Boards

Discuss this movie with other users on IMDb message board for The Curse of Frankenstein (1957)
Recent Posts (updated daily)User
Face Plant (spoilers) MrDeltoid77
Scream Addicts: Frankenstein films runninghex
Nastiest Fall gmksun
The best Frankenstein movie ever charlesskywalk
Anyone like the Hammer Frankenstein movies charlessykwalk63
Question About The Servant Girl kazamaru
See more »


If you enjoyed this title, our database also recommends:
- - - - -
Mary Shelley's Frankenstein The Revenge of Frankenstein Frankenstein Created Woman Frankenstein Frankenstein Must Be Destroyed
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
Show more recommendations

Related Links

Full cast and crew Company credits External reviews
News articles IMDb Horror section IMDb UK section

You may report errors and omissions on this page to the IMDb database managers. They will be examined and if approved will be included in a future update. Clicking the 'Edit page' button will take you through a step-by-step process.