The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957) - News Poster

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Hollywood Flashback: In 1958, Frank Sinatra and Pals Hijacked the Golden Globes

In many ways, the 15th Golden Globe Awards was a turning point. Held in 1958, it was the first time stars presented the awards — but they had to stage a bloodless party coup. "That year is famous," says Hollywood Foreign Press Association president Meher Tatna. "It took the night to a new level."

While some HFPA selections that evening remain cringe-inducing (The Mickey Mouse Club winning for best TV show), The Bridge on the River Kwai, which took the awards for best picture, actor and director (as it did at the Oscars), set the tone for the movie side...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Hollywood Flashback: In 1958, Frank Sinatra and Pals Hijacked the Golden Globes

In many ways, the 15th Golden Globe Awards was a turning point. Held in 1958, it was the first time stars presented the awards — but they had to stage a bloodless party coup. "That year is famous," says Hollywood Foreign Press Association president Meher Tatna. "It took the night to a new level."

While some HFPA selections that evening remain cringe-inducing (The Mickey Mouse Club winning for best TV show), The Bridge on the River Kwai, which took the awards for best picture, actor and director (as it did at the Oscars), set the tone for the movie side...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

Hollywood Flashback: In 1958, Frank Sinatra and Pals Hijacked the Golden Globes

In many ways, the 15th Golden Globe Awards was a turning point. Held in 1958, it was the first time stars presented the awards — but they had to stage a bloodless party coup. "That year is famous," says Hollywood Foreign Press Association president Meher Tatna. "It took the night to a new level."

While some HFPA selections that evening remain cringe-inducing (The Mickey Mouse Club winning for best TV show), The Bridge on the River Kwai, which took the awards for best picture, actor and director (as it did at the Oscars), set the tone for the movie side...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Hollywood Flashback: In 1958, Frank Sinatra and Pals Hijacked the Golden Globes

In many ways, the 15th Golden Globe Awards was a turning point. Held in 1958, it was the first time stars presented the awards — but they had to stage a bloodless party coup. "That year is famous," says Hollywood Foreign Press Association president Meher Tatna. "It took the night to a new level."

While some HFPA selections that evening remain cringe-inducing (The Mickey Mouse Club winning for best TV show), The Bridge on the River Kwai, which took the awards for best picture, actor and director (as it did at the Oscars), set the tone for the movie side...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

Play Dirty

In a war film, what’s the difference between nasty exploitation and just plain honest reportage? André De Toth made tough-minded action films with the best of them, and this nail-biting commando mission with Michael Caine and Nigel Davenport is simply superb, one of those great action pictures that’s not widely screened. To its credit it’s not ‘feel good’ enough to be suitable for Memorial Day TV marathons.

Play Dirty

Blu-ray

Twilight Time

1968 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 118 min. / Street Date October 17, 2017 / Available from the Twilight Time Movies Store 29.95

Starring: Michael Caine, Nigel Davenport, Nigel Green, Harry Andrews.

Cinematography: Edward Scaife

Film Editor: Jack Slade

Art Direction: Tom Morahan, Maurice Pelling

Original Music: Michel Legrand

Written by Lotte Colin, Melvyn Bragg, from a story by George Marton

Produced by Harry Saltzman

Directed by André De Toth

Some movies that were ignored when new now seem far more important, perhaps due to the tenor of times.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Speed of Passion: Close-Up on David Lean’s "Breaking the Sound Barrier"

  • MUBI
Close-Up is a feature that spotlights films now playing on Mubi. David Lean's Breaking the Sound Barrier (1952) is playing October 14 - November 13, 2017 on Mubi in the United States.John (J.R.) Ridgefield is a man possessed. The wealthy and influential aircraft industrialist is consumed by his desire to manufacture a plane capable of penetrating the inscrutable sound barrier. This supersonic obsession is a blessing and a curse for the Ridgefield family, providing their ample fortune and triggering largely latent rifts in their ancestral relations. It’s an opposition at the heart and soul of David Lean’s 1952 film The Sound Barrier, a post-war endorsement of British ingenuity and determination, and an emotional, blazing depiction of sacrifice and scientific achievement. The opening of The Sound Barrier (also known as Sound Barrier and Breaking the Sound Barrier), spotlights Philip Peel (John Justin), one of the film’s principal test pilots. In just under two minutes,
See full article at MUBI »

The Best War Movies Ever Made — IndieWire Critics Survey

The Best War Movies Ever Made — IndieWire Critics Survey
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film and TV critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best film in theaters right now?”, can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: In honor of Christopher Nolan’s “Dunkirk,” what is the best war movie ever made?

Read More‘Dunkirk’ Review: Christopher Nolan’s Monumental War Epic Is The Best Film He’s Ever Made Richard Brody (@tnyfrontrow), The New Yorker

Howard Hawks’ “The Dawn Patrol,” from 1930, shows soldiers and officers cracking up from the cruelty of their missions — and shows the ones who manage not to, singing and clowning with an exuberance that suggests the rictus of a death mask. There’s courage and heroism, virtue and honor — at a price that makes the words themselves seem foul. John Ford’s “The Lost Patrol,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Dunkirk’ Box Office: Why It Stands Little Chance of Breaking War Movie Records

‘Dunkirk’ Box Office: Why It Stands Little Chance of Breaking War Movie Records
Christopher Nolan’s World War II retreat-and-rescue epic “Dunkirk” has critical acclaim and is the first 2017 studio film to stand as a serious awards contender. However, it’s unlikely to become a significant player among the top war films at the box office.

Over the last decade, Nolan’s made five films that grossed $200 million-$658 million (adjusted domestic). However, while war films can still draw big numbers (Clint Eastwood’s 2014’s “American Sniper” earned $381 million, domestic adjusted), Nolan’s movie may be hampered by history.

Read More‘Dunkirk’: How Christopher Nolan Maintained Secrecy on His Set

War is the backdrop to some of the most popular films of all time, including “Star Wars” as well as “Gone With the Wind” and “The Sound of Music,” the #1 and 3 domestic grossers of all time. David Lean’s “Lawrence of Arabia” was more of a biography-character study, but it was an epic
See full article at Indiewire »

How ‘Planet of the Apes’ Started Hollywood’s Franchise Obsession

How ‘Planet of the Apes’ Started Hollywood’s Franchise Obsession
If Matt Reeves’ much-anticipated “War on the Planet of the Apes” (20th Century Fox) opens Friday to an expected $70 million or more, that would put it ahead (in domestic returns at least) of such recent high altitude-franchise stumbles as “Alien: Covenant,” “Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales” and “Transformers.”

Several factors contribute to the elevated respect for the series, going back almost half a century to when the first film, never intended as anything other than a standalone, became a surprise success in 1968.

Let’s track some curious highlights on the unusual trajectory that brings us to the ninth entry in the longest running English-language film series other than James Bond:

The Genesis Was a Stand-Alone Novel

Pierre Boule was well-known for the World War II novel “The Bridge on the River Kwai” which became a David Lean Best Picture winner and massive worldwide hit in the late 1950s.
See full article at Indiewire »

With ‘War for the Planet of the Apes,’ Matt Reeves Crafts a Personal Blockbuster

With ‘War for the Planet of the Apes,’ Matt Reeves Crafts a Personal Blockbuster
Before he took the helm of the “Planet of the Apes” franchise in 2014, Matt Reeves had no intention of ever directing a studio blockbuster. In fact, he figured he had a foolproof plan for getting himself out of any potential tentpole assignment: Insist on doing the story he wanted to do, the studio’s franchise-development apparatus be damned.

So when he was approached to direct “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes,” the second entry in the rebooted series inaugurated by Rupert Wyatt’s “Rise of the Planet of the Apes,” Reeves put his foot down right away.

“I was initially excited, and then I saw the [studio’s] outline and I said, this isn’t really the story I would want to tell, I don’t think this is for me,” Reeves says. “To my shock they said, ‘no, no, wait, just tell us the story you want to do.’ I said, ‘I
See full article at Variety - Film News »

How ‘The Empire Strikes Back’ and ‘The Great Escape’ Influenced ‘War for the Planet of the Apes’

How ‘The Empire Strikes Back’ and ‘The Great Escape’ Influenced ‘War for the Planet of the Apes’
The Bridge on the River Kwai, The Outlaw Josey Wales, Ben-Hur, and Apocalypse Now – these are a few of the classic films that inspired War for the Planet of the Apes. The battle of wills from David Lean’s classic and The Thin Red Line‘s “darker, more nuanced reflection of human nature” were key influences for filmmaker Matt Reeves. Before Reeves’ sequel, […]

The post How ‘The Empire Strikes Back’ and ‘The Great Escape’ Influenced ‘War for the Planet of the Apes’ appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

Film Review: ‘War for the Planet of the Apes’

Film Review: ‘War for the Planet of the Apes’
In the original “Planet of the Apes” movies, Caesar and his simian co-stars were buried beneath layers of prosthetic makeup, severely limiting their ability to emote. In Fox’s recently rebooted “Apes” trilogy (three and counting), the computer-generated chimps appear more human than the homo sapiens — which is clearly what the series has been working up to. In purely technical terms, director Matt Reeves more than achieves that goal, although it requires rigging the screenplay and reducing the human characters to crass two-dimensional stereotypes in the process.

Dawn has risen, and “War for the Planet of the Apes” picks up at a point where the world has been divided into two camps: those deeply impressed by all that directors Rupert Wyatt and Reeves have done with the franchise, and those who couldn’t care less. If you already find yourself on the side of the “Apes” enthusiasts (a fittingly militant lot), then “War” will likely be a
See full article at Variety - Film News »

A Weary-Looking Caesar Is Placed Front And Center In All-New War For The Planet Of The Apes Pic

With little under a month to go until release, 20th Century Fox’s marketing machine is beginning to fire on all cylinders in anticipation of War For the Planet of the Apes, Matt Reeves’ blockbuster threequel that will tee up a “biblical” clash between The Colonel (Woody Harrelson) and Andy Serkis’ radically evolved chimp, Caesar.

It’s not so much the final Apes film as it is the final chapter in Caesar’s story – for now, at least – and as you’ll see from Empire’s all-new close-up, Serkis’ glowering lead is looking a little worse for wear. Shot on 65mm film, Reeves and his creative team have undoubtedly swung for the fences with War For the Planet of the Apes, and from the trailers, TV spots, and scintillating promos alone, we’re quietly confident that the film will deliver in the visual department – and then some. Story-wise, we know
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Rangoon is a simple tale, unnecessarily complicated by its characters’ prevarications – Subhash K Jha reviews Rangoon

Starring Shahid Kapoor, Kangana Ranaut, Saif Ali Khan

Directed by Vishal Bhardwaj

In art, as in life, consistency is not a quality that is easily obtainable. In the life that is created in Vishal Bhardwaj’s art the characters are so flawed and fractured and so driven down to destruction by their own demoniacal desires that you fear they would collapse under the weight of their own ambitions and longings.

This is true as much of the characters as the director himself. Vishal Bhardwaj’s latest arguably his most ambitious film to date could have ended up being the Bombay Velvet/Mohenjo Daro of 2017. It is rescued, no redeemed, by an excruciatingly exquisite perception of the wounds and lashes that love pelts down on those who are its victims.

Rangoon is a simple tale, unnecessarily complicated by its characters’ prevarications. It is a story pinned down to a bobbing blueprint
See full article at Bollyspice »

Witness the Evolution of Cinematography with Compilation of Oscar Winners

This past weekend, the American Society of Cinematographers awarded Greig Fraser for his contribution to Lion as last year’s greatest accomplishment in the field. Of course, his achievement was just a small sampling of the fantastic work from directors of photography, but it did give us a stronger hint at what may be the winner on Oscar night. Ahead of the ceremony, we have a new video compilation that honors all the past winners in the category at the Academy Awards

Created by Burger Fiction, it spans the stunning silent landmark Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans all the way up to the end of Emmanuel Lubezki‘s three-peat win for The Revenant. Aside from the advancements in color and aspect ration, it’s a thrill to see some of cinema’s most iconic shots side-by-side. However, the best way to experience the evolution of the craft is by
See full article at The Film Stage »

You Have 1 Day to Watch These Movies Before They Disappear From Netflix

Netflix giveth, and Netflix taketh away. Although September will yield a ton of fun additions to the streaming platform, there are quite a few titles that will go away throughout the month. So if you're not done sobbing over A Walk to Remember or quoting Zoolander, you better get cracking. Time is ticking. Expiring Sept. 1 2 Fast 2 Furious A Walk to Remember Anywhere but Here Avengers Confidential: Black Widow and Punisher The Bridge on the River Kwai Call Me Crazy: A Five Film The Color Purple Crocodile Dundee Days of Thunder Defending Your Life Double Jeopardy Everybody Loves Raymond, seasons one to nine Exporting Raymond Flight of the Intruder Girl Rising Hachi: A Dog's Tale Hardball The Haunting Nick Cannon: Mr. Showbiz Our Man in Tehran Primal Fear Roboshark Roman Holiday S.W.A.T. Sins of My Father Spanglish Traffic The Weather Man The Wood Zoolander Expiring Sept. 4 Melissa and Joey,
See full article at BuzzSugar »

The Best Movies Leaving Netflix in September 2016

The Best Movies Leaving Netflix in September 2016
While next month will see a number of great movies arriving on Netflix, it will also see more than a few must-see films vanish. Here are the movies leaving Netflix in September 2016 that you need to catch before they’re gone. The Bridge on the River Kwai Nobody wants to admit it, but let’s face it: […]

The post The Best Movies Leaving Netflix in September 2016 appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

Watch a Video Essay on the Crisp Edits of David Lean

The trick, William Potter, is not minding that it cuts. Maestro director David Lean is renowned for his remarkable skills as a director, helming massive feats of cinema such as Lawrence of Arabia and The Bridge on the River Kwai. What seems to be less remarked upon regarding the director, it seems, is his knack for the edit. A video essay by Andrew Saladino delves into the often seamless, don’t-focus-on-it-and-you-won’t-notice-it style of editing that often runs throughout Lean’s work.

Fond of audio bridges, Lean would often seamlessly blend a transition with music, diegetic sound(s), or a combination of the two. These make for effortless flow throughout the narrative, guiding audiences through his worlds. However, he was just as good at jarring the audience when needed: building sounds in a particular scene and then dropping all of them on the cut. This style of edit the audience feels more viscerally,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Rian Johnson Names the Six Classic Films That Inspired the Tone of ‘Star Wars: Episode VIII’

While the film that had the most direct influence on the forthcoming Star Wars: Episode VIII is certainly J.J. Abrams‘ The Force Awakens, director Rian Johnson has shared some key inspiration when it comes to the tone and themes of his upcoming sci-fi sequel. While he previously stated two inspirations for the Star Wars saga’s next installment, that list has expanded, thanks his talk at Star Wars Celebration Europe.

The list includes six titles that Johnson encouraged the story group of Lucasfilm to watch before filming began, a thematic lookbook that features a mixture of beloved classics such as The Bridge on the River Kwai and lesser-known gems such as 1943’s Sahara. However, Twelve O’Clock High still stands as Johnson’s top pick for most influential. The most recent film on this list is from 1960, suggesting Johnson’s cinematic influences are less peer-based than deeply embedded in a more classical style.
See full article at The Film Stage »

5 Things You Need To Know From Star Wars Celebration Europe

Star Wars Celebration Europe is now officially over and everyone can start counting down the time until Star Wars Celebration Orlando begins. Before we get to next year hear are the top 5 most important things to come out of Swce.

1. Star Wars Rogue One is not a traditional Star Wars movie

It is safe to say with the trailer, sizzle reel, and an interview from the cast is that this movie does not have a happy ending to it. Expect a lot of casualties in this movie. A lot more speculation has come about since the panel for Rogue One finished. The biggest buzz came from Mads Mikkelson who confirmed that he is playing Galen who is Jyn Erso’s father. He also revealed that his character is a scientist who has created something that was initially to be beautiful and amazing. So now it starting to make sense that
See full article at LRM Online »
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