The Bridge on the River Kwai
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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006

6 items from 2015


Wright and Goldwyn Have an Ugly Parting of the Ways; Brando (More or Less) Comes to the Rescue

11 March 2015 2:07 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Teresa Wright-Samuel Goldwyn association comes to a nasty end (See preceding post: "Teresa Wright in 'Shadow of a Doubt': Alfred Hitchcock Heroine in His Favorite Film.") Whether or not because she was aware that Enchantment wasn't going to be the hit she needed – or perhaps some other disagreement with Samuel Goldwyn or personal issue with husband Niven BuschTeresa Wright, claiming illness, refused to go to New York City to promote the film. (Top image: Teresa Wright in a publicity shot for The Men.) Goldwyn had previously announced that Wright, whose contract still had another four and half years to run, was to star in a film version of J.D. Salinger's 1948 short story "Uncle Wiggily in Connecticut." Instead, he unceremoniously – and quite publicly – fired her.[1] The Goldwyn organization issued a statement, explaining that besides refusing the assignment to travel to New York to help generate pre-opening publicity for Enchantment, »

- Andre Soares

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The Battle for ‘Lawrence of Arabia’

16 February 2015 5:45 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Part I: The Lawrence Bureau

T.E. Lawrence (1888-1935) ranks among the 20th Century’s oddest heroes. This short, smart, and mischievous British soldier helped organize the Arab Revolt against Turkey, a secondary front of the First World War. He became Emir Feisal’s trusted ally, painfully conscious that the Allies wouldn’t honor promises of independence. After the Paris Peace Conference, Lawrence retreated into the Royal Air Force and Tank Corps as a private soldier, T.E. Shaw.

Lawrence lived a curious double life, befriending both private soldiers and notables like Winston Churchill and George Bernard Shaw. He wrote memoirs and translated Homer while repairing boats and seaplanes. His intellect, warmth, and puckish humor masked internal torment – guilt for failing to secure Arab freedom, regret for two brothers killed in the war, shame over an incident where Turkish soldiers sexually assaulted him.

In his autobiography Seven Pillars of Wisdom, Lawrence »

- Christopher Saunders

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Non-American Born Best Director Oscar Winners

11 February 2015 7:24 AM, PST | Scott Feinberg | See recent Scott Feinberg news »

By Anjelica Oswald

Managing Editor 

With the DGA Award in hand, Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu has become a frontrunner in the best director Oscar race for Birdman.

Only seven winners of the DGA Award have not won the best director Oscar in the 66 years that the Directors Guild of America has given the award. The most recent case was two years ago, when Ben Affleck wasn’t even nominated for the best director Oscar for Argo, which won best picture.

No American has won for best director since 2011 and if Inarritu, who is from Mexico, takes the Oscar this year, the trend will continue. Inarritu could become the second Latin American director to win for best director, following Alfonso Cuaron’s win last year.

In the 86 years since the Academy Awards’ inception, 89 Oscars have been given for best director. Twenty-six awards (29 percent) went to non-American born directors.

At the first annual »

- Anjelica Oswald

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2015 Edition of TCM’s 31 Days Of Oscar Starts Feb. 1st

27 January 2015 12:21 PM, PST | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Turner Classic Movies (TCM) will kick off its 31 Days of Oscar, the network’s annual month-long celebration of the Academy Awards, on February 1 at 8pm with a screening of And the Oscar Goes To…, a documentary tracing the history of the Academy Awards, which premiered on the network last year.

Programming each night, starting February 1 and running through March 3, will feature a chronological “History of the Oscars” through Academy Award-nominated films highlighting at least one Best Picture winner.

Additionally, daytime programming will focus on distinguished films of a particular genre, from adventure to comedy, drama to romance, westerns to musicals.

The programming lineup for this year’s 31 Days of Oscar includes Gone With the Wind (1939), Casablanca (1942), Ben Hur (1959), Patton (1970), The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957), The King’s Speech (2010) and The Artist (2011). A complete schedule for the month-long Academy Awards tribute is available at 31days.tcm.com. A preview of »

- Melissa Thompson

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Why ‘American Sniper’ Is a Coming Out Party for Patriotism (Guest Blog)

22 January 2015 7:26 PM, PST | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Moviegoers can finally enjoy a film with a genuine hero who served his country and fought in a righteous war

The New England Patriots spent this past weekend earning a spot in the Super Bowl. But many more patriots went to the movies and propelled “American Sniper” to a record-setting January box office weekend.

In doing so, they officially declared war against the likes of Michael Moore, Seth Rogen and so many liberal, peace loving, pot-smoking A-listers and Hollywood suits who, since the 1970s, have had an ambivalent, if not disdainful relationship with war movies in general, and American patriotism in particular. »

- Thane Rosenbaum

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The Definitive Best Picture Losers

1 January 2015 12:22 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

It’s December. And you know what that means? It means for every popcorn blockbuster, we get about three Oscar bait movies that are made solely to appease that body of somewhat stodgy Academy voters. Don’t get me wrong – a good portion of the Best Picture winners in history are still some of the greatest films ever made – “The Godfather” (Parts I and II), “Schindler’s List,” etc. But what about those historically good movies that got the nomination, but didn’t take home the prize? What about those popular movies that carried fan support, but lost out to a smaller, most of the time better, film? Well, here they are. This list focuses on those films that may or may not have been produced as Oscar bait, but earned the recognition of “Best Picture nominee,” only to walk away without the big prize. As usual, not in order of worst to best. »

- Joshua Gaul

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006

6 items from 2015


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