The Bridge on the River Kwai
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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006

1-20 of 25 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


War Films at the Oscars

13 October 2014 8:30 AM, PDT | Scott Feinberg | See recent Scott Feinberg news »

By Anjelica Oswald

Managing Editor

Set during the final months of World War II, Fury follows a tank commander (played by Brad Pitt) and his crew as they head into Nazi Germany as part of the Allies’ final push. The film also stars Logan Lerman, Shia Labeouf, John Bernthal and Michael Pena. The Hollywood Reporter’s Todd McCarthy said the film is “a modern version of the sort of movie Hollywood turned out practically every week back in the 1940s and 1950s.” Fury opens Oct. 17.

Could Fury score a best picture nomination at the 87th Academy Awards? Both war biopics and fictional war films — about real wars or battles — have historically done well at the Oscars; however, the current projections show that the race will be a tight one. Here’s a look at some of the fictional war films that scored nominations for best picture:

War-themed best picture winners »

- Anjelica Oswald

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Which is the greatest British film in history? No one seems to be in agreement

11 October 2014 5:32 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Best British movies of all time? (Image: a young Michael Caine in 'Get Carter') Ten years ago, Get Carter, starring Michael Caine as a dangerous-looking London gangster (see photo above), was selected as the United Kingdom's very best movie of all time according to 25 British film critics polled by Total Film magazine. To say that Mike Hodges' 1971 thriller was a surprising choice would be an understatement. I mean, not a David Lean epic or an early Alfred Hitchcock thriller? What a difference ten years make. On Total Film's 2014 list, published last May, Get Carter was no. 44 among the magazine's Top 50 best British movies of all time. How could that be? Well, first of all, people would be very naive if they took such lists seriously, whether we're talking Total Film, the British Film Institute, or, to keep things British, Sight & Sound magazine. Second, whereas Total Film's 2004 list was the result of a 25-critic consensus, »

- Andre Soares

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Who is Miyavi?

9 October 2014 9:06 AM, PDT | Scott Feinberg | See recent Scott Feinberg news »

By Anjelica Oswald

Managing Editor

Miyavi is a relatively unknown name in the States, but this soon may change. Miyavi (real name Takamasa Ishihara) is making his English acting debut as the brutal Pow camp overseer Mutsuhiro Watanabe — known as “The Bird” — in the Angelina Jolie-directed film Unbroken. Based on the book of the same name by Laura Hillenbrand, the film tells the true story of olympian and WWII Japanese Pow survivor Louis Zamperini.

Miyavi, known to some as the samurai guitarist, is a Japanese musician known for his ‘slap style’ guitar playing.

He was 17 when he joined the band Due le Quartz (he went by Miyabi), but after that disbanded in 2002, he began to pursue a solo career. He has since gone on four world tours, the most recent which was earlier this year, and has worked with bands, including Good Charlotte.

Miyavi is the founder and CEO of J-Glam Inc, »

- Anjelica Oswald

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Fox Chief On Oscar Contender ‘Exodus: Gods & Kings': “You Don’t See Movies On This Scale Anymore”

1 October 2014 6:13 PM, PDT | Deadline New York | See recent Deadline New York news »

Earlier today Deadline debuted the new trailer for 20th Century Fox’s big Christmas picture Exodus: Gods And Kings. The large-scale biblical drama looks Big. Epic. The kind of movie studios used to thrive on but are simply cost-prohibitive these days. Well, they seem to be making a comeback. Ben-Hur, which took 11 Academy Awards in 1959 including Best Picture, is now being remade. Of course Paramount released Darren Aronofsky’s Noah early in the year. But Gladiator in 2000 was the last big-scale epic of this period to wow Academy voters into giving up their Best Picture vote. It’s no coincidence that Ridley Scott directed that one, which also brought Russell Crowe an Oscar for Best Actor. Now Scott is back doing the impossible for Fox with Exodus.

In a brief conversation before the studio’s special press presentation Tuesday evening at the Zanuck Theatre on its lot, Fox Chairman Jim Gianopulos »

- Pete Hammond

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Academy's Special 2014 Honorees: Veterans Belafonte, Carrière, Miyazaki and - Finally - O'Hara

29 August 2014 4:02 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Honorary Oscars 2014: Hayao Miyazaki, Jean-Claude Carrière, and Maureen O’Hara; Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award goes to Harry Belafonte One good thing about the creation of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences’ Governors Awards — an expedient way to remove the time-consuming presentation of the (nearly) annual Honorary Oscar from the TV ratings-obsessed, increasingly youth-oriented Oscar show — is that each year up to four individuals can be named Honorary Oscar recipients, thus giving a better chance for the Academy to honor film industry veterans while they’re still on Planet Earth. (See at the bottom of this post a partial list of those who have gone to the Great Beyond, without having ever received a single Oscar statuette.) In 2014, the Academy’s Board of Governors has selected a formidable trio of honorees: Japanese artist and filmmaker Hayao Miyazaki, 73; French screenwriter Jean-Claude Carrière, 82; and Irish-born Hollywood actress Maureen O’Hara, »

- Andre Soares

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Review: WWII Triple Feature: "Attack" (1955), "Beach Red" (1967) And "Attack On The Iron Coast"

19 August 2014 3:49 AM, PDT | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

By Lee Pfeiffer 

Now this is what you call a bargain: three terrific WWII flicks for only $10 on Amazon, courtesy of Shout! Factory's Timeless Media label, which continues to distribute first rate editions of films that were often considered to be second-rate at the time of their initial release. This "War Film Triple Feature" package includes three gems that were not particularly notable at the time of their release. Two have grown in stature, while the third has benefited only from Cinema Retro writer Howard Hughes' enthusiastic coverage in issue #25. The films included in the set are:

"Attack" (1955)- During the period of WWII, both the Allied and Axis film industries concentrated on feature films that were pure propaganda designed to motivate their fighting men and the public at large. By the early-to-mid-1950s, however,  more introspective viewpoints emerged among Hollywood directors and writers. With the conflict now over, »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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Elizabeth Taylor in "Suddenly Last Summer". Oh how that star burned.

12 August 2014 3:29 PM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

This is an episode of Hit Me With Your Best Shot

"Suddenly... last summer" is spoken so often in Suddenly Last Summer (1959), Joseph L Mankiewicz & Gore Vidal's adaptation of Tennessee Williams play, that it starts to take on a kind of trancy grandeur. The actresses retreat inward, psychologically, in the thrall of their own theatricality, the overheated jungles of art direction around them, and surely their good fortune to be playing Tennessee Williams characters.

my favorite scene in the film

To a minor degree the repetition of "suddenly...last summer" is not unlike the effect of Rita whispering "Mulholland Drive" like an incantation in Mulholland Dr. The comparison seems apt since both films are batshit crazy sexually charged nightmares in which a beautiful brunette has selective amnesia issues.  But let's not drift away to 2001. We stay in 1959. And two beautiful brunettes is exactly what I want to talk about »

- NATHANIEL R

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Super-8 Movie Madness Goes To War! August 5th at The Way Out Club

28 July 2014 8:55 AM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

War movies have been around as long as cinema has existed. There is something about the horror, bravery, tragedy, and excitement of combat that has inspired filmmakers and drawn audiences. We’ll be celebrating the Great War films On August 5th at The Way Out Club with Super-8 Movie Madness Goes To War!

We’ll be showing six films in the condensed (average length: 15 minutes) Super-8 sound film format projected on The Way Out’s big screen that tells heroic stories of World War Two. They are: William Holden and Alec Guinness in The Bridge On The River Kwai, Clint Eastwood and Richard Burton in Where Eagles Dare, Lee Marvin and Charles Bronson in The Dirty Dozen, Frank Sinatra in Von Ryan’S Express, Harrison Ford and Robert Shaw in Force Ten From Navarone, and John Wayne and an all-star cast in The Longest Day.

Movie that we’ll be »

- Tom Stockman

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Entertainment Geekly: An appreciation of 'Beneath the Planet of the Apes,' one of the silliest, bleakest movies ever made

10 July 2014 2:45 PM, PDT | EW.com - PopWatch | See recent EW.com - PopWatch news »

It is entirely possible that Planet of the Apes has the best batting average of any long-running movie franchise. In 46 years, there have been good Apes movies, and fascinatingly bad Apes movies, and at least one legitimate Hall of Fame masterwork (the original film, one of the most brutally cynical adventures in Hollywood history). The first film was based on a novel by French author Pierre Boule about a monkey planet—but the sequels set off in fascinating, frequently goofy, always energetic new directions.

The central running motif of Humans Wearing Ape Makeup (analog or digital) turned into a freefloating »

- Darren Franich

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The Definitive War Movies: 10-1

2 July 2014 8:30 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Here we are, at the top of the mountain. We’ve had plenty from every war imaginable, some supportive of war efforts, some not. But the more interesting war films really focus on the people; the internal struggles those men and women have about what they are doing. Whether made in America, Germany, the United Kingdom, or anywhere else, war is not just a battle between good and evil. It’s a life and death struggle between opposing sides that may not be that different. The movies at the top of this list may be subtle or straightforward, but each of them is a clear snapshot that lets audiences see what it means to fight, so they don’t have to.

10. Paths of Glory (1957)

Directed by: Stanley Kurbick

Conflict: World War I

Before Stanley Kubrick grabbed the rights, the source material for Paths of Glory had a long history. The novel, »

- Joshua Gaul

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The Bridge on the River Kwai

25 May 2014 10:00 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

David Lean's 2 hour and 41 minute war drama was a box office smash in 1957, beloved not only by critics but World War II vets as well, regardless of the fact that its hero, played by Alec Guiness, is in fact an anti-hero, a by-the-book pedant whose obsession with military protocol only succeeds in aiding his enemy. The canny screenplay (by Carl Foreman) provides two compelling counterpoints to Guiness' driven colonel in William Holden's deadbeat sailor and Sessue Hayakawa's weak-willed commandant. Lean's masterful command of the widescreen action and intimate drama makes Bridge an endlessly rewatchable experience.

The post The Bridge on the River Kwai appeared first on Trailers From Hell.

»

- TFH Team

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30 Things You (Probably) Didn't Know About 'Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom'

22 May 2014 4:00 AM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

Thirty years ago, "Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom," the much-awaited follow-up to "Raiders of the Lost Ark," debuted. Indiana Jones was back -- although the film was set earlier than the events of "Raiders" -- and this time, he had a dame (Kate Capshaw) and a kid (Jonathan Ke Quan) with him. Oh, and he wasn't fighting Nazis, just a deadly, child-enslaving cult.

If you're not old enough to remember, this (along with "Gremlins" and "Poltergeist") was the movie that prompted the creation of the PG-13 rating, after parents complained that a PG-rating wasn't adequate for a movie that includes a scene where a man's still-beating heart is ripped out of his chest.

But did you know that an Oscar-winning Hollywood legend almost had a small role in the film? Or what stars pranked Harrison Ford on the set? Didn't think so.

Here are 30 things you might not have known about the movie. »

- Sharon Knolle

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New Apes Trailer Proves that Human Beings Are a Mortal Danger to Other Earthlings

8 May 2014 1:07 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Dawn of the Planet of the Apes’ trailer: New trailer for 2014 ‘Planet of the Apes’ film shows humans are the most dangerous apes of them all (image: Caesar in ‘Dawn of the Planet of the Apes’) The new Dawn of the Planet of the Apes trailer is out. Caesar and his fellow genetically modified apes enjoy a peaceful existence until created-in-God’s-image apes — that’s self-delusional humans — discover the Gmo apes’ hiding place in a lush forest. Much like gays were blamed for the AIDS virus a few decades ago, the virtuous and righteous humans (Gary Oldman among them) blame the Gmo apes for a virus that all but wiped out humankind. Enter the military, ever eager to save the world for peace and happiness by way of some heavy-duty weaponry. Needless to say, I’m ardently rooting for Caesar (Andy Serkis) and his fellow Gmo apes. Check out the »

- Andre Soares

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Bomb Girls: Top Ten World War II Movies

3 May 2014 5:22 AM, PDT | Reelzchannel.com | See recent ReelzChannel news »

Bomb Girls is back! Reelz's award–winning, World War II-era series returns this month in the two-hour original movie Bomb Girls: Facing the Enemy and will likely answer all the nagging questions left over from the second season finale. To get in the mood, we thought we'd look back at our favorite World War II movies before Bomb Girls: Facing the Enemy debuts on Monday, May 26th at 9p Et/ 6p Pt.

Of course, you can also catch up with past episodes of the show every Sunday at 11a Et/ 8a Pt or binge-watch the entire series on Memorial Day weekend, but, however you want to prepare, make sure you check out our list of the Top 10 World War II movies first.

Get Those Dancing Shoes Ready

Facing the Enemy Premieres Memorial Day

Next Showing:

Link | Posted 5/3/2014 by Ryan

Bomb Girls | Quentin Tarantino | Wes Anderson | Saving Private Ryan »

- Ryan Gowland

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Veteran Bergman Star, Coen Bros' Cast Members to Star in Sw: Episode VII

29 April 2014 6:25 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Star Wars: Episode VII’ cast announced (photo: ‘Star Wars: Episode VII’ cast member Max von Sydow in ‘Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close’) Star Wars: Episode VII cast members have been announced. The world had been waiting with bated breath. Who will The Force be with? Well, not with humankind and its fellow Earth dwellers (apart from cockroaches and various types of worms) — if news reports about the eventual fate of the planet are accurate. But don’t despair. The End credits for Planet Earth should come after Lucasfilm and Walt Disney Studios (instead of former Star Wars film distributor 20th Century Fox) amass a few more billion dollars following the release of a whole array of new Star Wars sequels in the coming years. So, the announced (mostly European) Star Wars: Episode VII cast members are, to date, the following: Oscar Isaac (Sucker Punch, widely praised for his performance in Joel »

- Zac Gille

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Review: The Railway Man

25 April 2014 7:30 AM, PDT | Slackerwood | See recent Slackerwood news »

A particular subgenre I've enjoyed from an early age thanks to my father's influence is war movies, including the classics -- The Bridge on the River Kwai, Kelly's Heroes and The Dirty Dozen topped our list -- with a particular fondness for prisoner-of-war tales including Victory and Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence. I find the stories of brave servicemen who overcome torturous emotional and physical conditions to be inspiring testaments to courage and bravery.

Directed by Jonathan Teplitzky, the movie The Railway Man portrays such a character, Eric Lomax (Colin Firth). It's based on the real-life story of a British army officer and radio engineer who was captured with his unit during the fall of Singapore in 1942. The prisoners of war were used to build the railroad from Burma to Siam through rough terrain, under brutal conditions.

The Railway Man begins with a chance encounter on a train between Eric Lomax »

- Debbie Cerda

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The Railway Man – The Review

24 April 2014 4:12 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Railway Man is a tale of revenge and redemption in the trappings of a WWII melodrama. The true tale jumps back and forth between 1942 and 1980 to tell the story about one man forced to deal with his horrible memories of the atrocities of war. The Railway Man is a sober, well-meaning picture that aims to raise serious issues about truth and justice, but it’s ultimately undone by its own earnestness and predictability.

In 1980 Eric Lomax (Colin Firth) is a socially awkward rail enthusiast (not a trainspotter, he clarifies) who travels around the UK with a detailed knowledge about train timetables and British towns.  Eric meets nurse Patti (Nicole Kidman) on a train and after a whirlwind romance, they are married. But after the honeymoon Eric is waking up in the night sweating and screaming – it’s the emotional distress caused by his treatment at the hands of Japanese prison »

- Tom Stockman

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The Railway Man review: a derailment on the line

17 April 2014 7:29 AM, PDT | www.flickfilosopher.com | See recent FlickFilosopher news »

Almost entirely ignores the amazing aspect of this true story that makes it worth telling, and even the very good performances point us in another direction than the intended one. I’m “biast” (pro): like the cast; enjoy stories about WWII

I’m “biast” (con): nothing

I have not read the source material

(what is this about? see my critic’s minifesto)

The Railway Man starts out like a sweet little romance, when Colin Firth meets Nicole Kidman, somewhere near Edinburgh in 1980, on a train he’s only on because his encyclopedic knowledge of train schedules is allowing him to compensate for an unexpected delay in his travel plans. “I’m not a trainspotter,” he assures her — and us — not that most prototypical of British nerds; “I’m a railway enthusiast.” Later, he is able to contrive a second meeting with her because of his, yes, trainspotting superpower. »

- MaryAnn Johanson

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'The Railway Man' (2013) Movie Review

11 April 2014 9:00 AM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

Directed by Jonathan Teplitzky and based on the autobiography of Eric Lomax, the man behind the nickname of the title character, The Railway Man is yet another traditionally told period piece, elevated due to a wonderfully effective story and strong lead performances from Colin Firth and Jeremy Irvine. We're first introduced to Lomax (Firth) as a middle-aged British Army veteran of World War II. He's obviously a quiet man, but there are no visible physical or emotional scars, and for the time being his life is about to take a turn for the better. A chance meeting with a woman, Patti (Nicole Kidman), aboard a train results in love at first sight. The two eventually marry and find a house together, but the horrors of war can't elude him forever. It's never quite clear if Eric told Patti about his time in the British Army, but she's soon made well »

- Brad Brevet

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Curio: The Storied Career of Alec Guinness

2 April 2014 7:00 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Alexa here to wish a Happy Centennial to Alec Guinness. Born 100 years ago today to a single mother in London, Guinness' theatre career began in his 20s. It wasn't until after he served in the Royal Navy in World War II that his film career began in earnest, and soon he was playing eight roles in one movie (Kind Hearts and Coronets).  One of his six famously tempestuous collaborations with David Lean, The Bridge on the River Kwai, got him his Oscar for Best Actor, although he was nominated four other times (even for Best Screenplay) and he received an honorary Oscar in 1980. The geeks know him as Obi-Wan, but for me he will forever be Professor Marcus from The Ladykillers (a little obsession of mine).

Here are some vintage curios to celebrate his career in film

»

- Alexa

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006

1-20 of 25 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


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