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Bermuda Cockleshells (1957)

Approved | | Short, Sport | November 1957 (USA)
This "Sportscope" series entry chronicles a race for a special class of yachts called 'Bermuda fitted dinghys.'

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(as Harry Smith)

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Peter Roberts ...
Narrator (voice)
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Storyline

A documentary look at the boats sailed by youth at the Royal Bermuda Yacht Club -- the Bermuda-fitted dinghy, 15 feet long, narrow, with a ten-foot bow sprint. The mast is 40-feet high, so there's up to 1000 square feet of sail; it only goes in the water when it's ready to sail, because it needs a crew to weight the dinghy and keep it upright. We watch crews of youth - the Firefly fleet - prepare their own 12-foot version of the racing dinghies. The shallow draft and center-board construction make for racing thrills. How do sailboats sail into the wind? Written by <jhailey@hotmail.com>

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Plot Keywords:

dinghy | sail | yacht | crew | bermuda | See All (29) »

Genres:

Short | Sport

Certificate:

Approved
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Release Date:

November 1957 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Sportscopes (1956-1957 season) #12: Bermuda Cockleshells  »

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Technical Specs

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Sound Mix:

(RCA Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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User Reviews

 
Sailing in Bermuda...
19 July 2008 | by (U.S.A.) – See all my reviews

Peter Roberts narrates this brief glimpse of Bermuda sailing craft, courtesy of the Royal Bermuda Yacht Club where men and children practice their skill in handling sailboat dinghies in the Bermuda waters.

The odd looking rigs make for picturesque viewing, but the film cries out for color. Sailing into the wind toward a finish line is the whole point of these races and sometimes the participants get more than they bargained for when the dinghies are upset by either a too crowded crew or lines that get snagged. Nevertheless, despite getting dumped into water occasionally, these crews of four to nine men seem to be having a good time.

It's a cooling off kind of thing to watch on a hot summer day.


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