12 Angry Men
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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2003 | 2002

11 items from 2014


David Dobkin interview: The Judge, Robert Downey Jr, and colour palettes

21 October 2014 2:05 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

We chat to the director of The Judge, David Dobkin, about the choices he made when shooting his film...

Robert Downey Jr. is front and centre stage throughout almost all of The Judge, and giving a typically high-energy, irresistible performance. I spoke to the film’s director David Dobkin about the practicalities of working with such a full-on, super-confident performer, about creating a space for actors in general, but also about the film’s very specific, carefully conceived look. It was like taking a ten minute film school in everything from lighting to lenses to rehearsal to editing.

When I think back on your film, I can’t not see that colour palette. It’s really controlled.

Yes. I’m glad you noticed that. I think you have to, as a filmmaker, be aware that everything people see or experience is part of the feeling that you create. Colours do create a feeling, »

- sarahd

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The Judge, film review: Hot-shot actors Duvall and Downey Jr make a compelling case

16 October 2014 3:00 PM, PDT | The Independent | See recent The Independent news »

The best courtroom dramas are never simply about the case in question. From Twelve Angry Men to Anatomy of a Murder, stories ostensibly about lawyers, juries and the inexorable march of justice invariably shift their focus away from the "accused" and on to those pondering his or her fate. The Judge is an Oedipal drama masquerading as a film about a murder case. The twist here is that the judge himself (Robert Duvall) is in the dock and that the hot-shot lawyer (Robert Downey Jr) defending him is both his own son and the one who feels most betrayed by him. »

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The HeyUGuys Interview: Simon Merrells on Judas Ghost

10 July 2014 6:00 AM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

Stepping out of the haunted village hall for a break from a dance with the supernatural, Simon Merrells took the time to rendezvous with HeyUGuys to discuss his foray into horror with Judas Ghost. Probably most recognised for his role on TV’s Spartacus: War of the Damned in which he played the villainous Crassus with brutal pomp, Merrells is a regular face on both the big and the small screen.

During the course of our brief conversation he shared with us how he discovered his love of performance, and storytelling, as well as his early memories of horror’s most famous monsters and authors. Whilst reflecting on filmmaking as a musical journey, along with the fortunes of the modern short film he invited us inside the village hall to discuss his one location supernatural horror.

Why a career in acting? Was there that one inspirational moment?

Aside from the »

- Paul Risker

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2014 Cannes Critics’ Panel Day 6: Dardennes Receive a Bonus with “Two Days, One Night” & “Still the Water” Floats

21 May 2014 7:55 AM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Cannes May 20th – Day 6.

Past the midway point, this morning’s 8:30 a.m. screening proved that The Dardennes might be the first to three-peat. Palme d’Or winners with Rosetta (1999) and L’Enfant (2005), the Belgium trio (including Marion Cotillard) are currently sitting at the pole position among our critics with a solid 4-star rating average. Minimalist, sprawling in microscopic scope with a Twelve Angry Men-like formula, the world’s larger issues get truncated into a mother-wife trying to safe her job and potentially, keep the family nest intact. With a resolution that could have ended in a manner of ways and still work, it’s disarming how the Dardennes manage to immerse the viewer in this heroine’s plight and flight with the utmost of ease. Two Days, One Night is the buzz title of the fest so far. There last film, The Kid with a Bike (2011) won the Grand Prix. »

- Eric Lavallee

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John Goodman and Ken Watanabe To Voice Two New Autobots In Transformers: Age Of Extinction; Download The Movie App

8 May 2014 9:38 AM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Director Michael Bay has tapped John Goodman and Ken Watanabe to voice two all new Autobots in his highly anticipated film Transformers: Age Of Extinction, the fourth film in the global blockbuster franchise from Paramount Pictures.

Goodman and Watanabe will join legendary voice actors Peter Cullen and Frank Welker.

Goodman will play Autobot Hound, Watanabe will play Drift, while Cullen reprises his role as the voice of Optimus Prime, and Welker takes on another new character, Galvatron.

“I am pleased to welcome two gifted and versatile actors, John Goodman and Ken Watanabe, to the world of Transformers,” said Bay. “And to reteam with Peter and Frank, who have brought Transformers characters alive from the beginning. I’ve been fortunate to work with some of the best voice talent in the business, and together we will introduce several exciting new robots to fans of the franchise around the world.”

Rounding out »

- Michelle McCue

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Tribeca panel with Megan Griffiths, Aaron Katz, Amy Berg, Adam Rapp and Stephen Belber

20 April 2014 9:52 AM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

l - r Filmmakers Aaron Katz, Megan Griffiths, Adam Rapp, Amy Berg and Stephen Belber with moderator Mark Adams Tribeca Talks: Adaptation & Creation Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

On a sunny afternoon during the Tribeca Film Festival, directors Megan Griffiths (Lucky Them, starring Toni Collette and Thomas Haden Church); Aaron Katz (Land Ho!); Amy Berg (Every Secret Thing with Diane Lane, Elizabeth Banks, Dakota Fanning and Nate Parker); Adam Rapp (Loitering With Intent with Marisa Tomei and Sam Rockwell) and Stephen Belber (Match, starring Patrick Stewart), gathered for a Tribeca Talks: Pen to Paper - Adaptation & Creation panel.

Sidney Lumet's Twelve Angry Men, Julian Schnabel's The Diving Bell And The Butterfly, Uli Edel's Last Exit To Brooklyn, Michael Winterbottom's Tristram Shandy: A Cock And Bull Story and Dead Man Walking, directed by Tim Robbins, were cited as important adaptations of literary works to cinema. And Whit Stillman writing »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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My guilty pleasure: Liar Liar

2 April 2014 11:30 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

It may be a formulaic knockabout comedy, but beneath the surface of this early Jim Carrey outing lurks a compelling honesty and an important life lesson

Courtrooms and curses: two anchoring Hollywood notions. Audiences love a courtroom drama. And they'll buy in to a curse any curse, from a body swap to a distasteful compulsion or an unwanted power as long as there's an adorable kid involved in its conception or application.

I like to think that when screenwriters Paul Guay and Stephen Mazur first sketched out Liar Liar, they'd just emerged from back-to-back screenings of To Kill a Mockingbird and Big, or maybe Twelve Angry Men and Vice Versa (a film from 1988, should you be unfamiliar with it, in which Fred Savage, with the help of a magical Buddhist skull, curses Judge Reinhold to spend a week as a preteen). Guay and Mazur saw a curse and a courtroom »

- Tom Lamont

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James Rebhorn obituary

24 March 2014 12:00 PM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Actor who played FBI agents, cops and traditional fathers

Anyone looking for an actor to play an unyielding martinet could hardly have done better over the last few decades than to cast James Rebhorn, who has died aged 65 after suffering from skin cancer. Poker-thin and poker-faced, this white-haired, crinkle-eyed performer excelled at bringing a glint of bureaucratic bloody-mindedness to small parts that might otherwise have slipped past unnoticed. He could be sympathetic too, even slightly buffoonish, as proved by his turn as the father of the gadabout Dickie Greenleaf (Jude Law) in The Talented Mr Ripley (1999), but he could also turn on a dime from charm to vindictiveness.

His speciality was playing officialdom in all its manifestations: cops, FBI agents, doctors, politicians. Asked in 2012 about his repeated appearances in legal dramas (he starred on television in Boston Legal, Law & Order, The Practice and The Good Wife, among others), he drew »

- Ryan Gilbey

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James Rebhorn obituary

24 March 2014 12:00 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Actor who played FBI agents, cops and traditional fathers

Anyone looking for an actor to play an unyielding martinet could hardly have done better over the last few decades than to cast James Rebhorn, who has died aged 65 after suffering from skin cancer. Poker-thin and poker-faced, this white-haired, crinkle-eyed performer excelled at bringing a glint of bureaucratic bloody-mindedness to small parts that might otherwise have slipped past unnoticed. He could be sympathetic too, even slightly buffoonish, as proved by his turn as the father of the gadabout Dickie Greenleaf (Jude Law) in The Talented Mr Ripley (1999), but he could also turn on a dime from charm to vindictiveness.

His speciality was playing officialdom in all its manifestations: cops, FBI agents, doctors, politicians. Asked in 2012 about his repeated appearances in legal dramas (he starred on television in Boston Legal, Law & Order, The Practice and The Good Wife, among others), he drew »

- Ryan Gilbey

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Martin Shaw: Roman Polanski, Macbeth, the Royal Court and me

17 February 2014 1:58 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The Judge John Deed star remembers the 60s at the Royal Court, and being discovered by the great auteur

By 1969 I'd done a few roles for Sidney Bernstein's Granada Television, which was the place for new, dangerous drama, and a couple of plays at the Royal Court. I was in their first revival of Look Back in Anger. John Osborne came along to rehearsals a lot – he was shocked at how gritty and visceral we'd made the production. It was an incredibly exciting time – I felt part of a movement of dissent. I did the premiere of David Storey's The Contractor, with the great Lindsay Anderson, and then I did a play called Cancer, which was later renamed Moonchildren.

Cancer was based on the experiences of its writer, Michael Weller. It's about a group of students who rent a flat. It's a very funny and very realistic play, »

- Martin Shaw

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Blu-ray Review - The Poirot Collection

22 January 2014 9:56 AM, PST | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Paul Risker reviews The Poirot Collection, consisting of Murder on the Orient Express, Death on the Nile and Evil Under the Sun...

From Ealing to Poirot by way of The Wicker Man, the Studiocanal back catalogue is filled to the brim with classic films that serve our home entertainment adventures of discovery and rediscovery. Now with the release of The Poirot Collection that brings together the three feature films of Murder on the Orient Express, Death on the Nile and Evil Under the Sun, a glorious Blu-Ray warmth is offered to the crime aficionado during these winter months.

One of the icons of detective literature and television, Hercule Poirot first emerged from the imagination of the English writer Agatha Christie, before Albert Finney, Peter Ustinov and David Suchet introduced her creation to the screen. Between them they have imbued Poirot with a Shakespearean presence; each interpretation an individual joy to watch, »

- Gary Collinson

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2003 | 2002

11 items from 2014


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