"Wagon Train"
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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

12 items from 2015


Actress Yvonne Craig Dead at 78 – TV’s Batgirl

18 August 2015 10:15 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Rip our beloved Bat Beauty! A punch in the gut to Batfans. A first crush for men of a certain age, the beautiful Yvonne Craig has died at the age of 78.

Yvonne was born on the 16th of May 1937. In her early life before her television career she trained to be a ballet teacher. She gradually moved into acting during the 1950s. Before appearing on television she starred in a few films including; The Young Land, The Gene Krupa Story, Ski Party, and High Time. She even played alongside Elvis Presley in Kissin’ Cousins and briefly dated the King. During the mid-1960s Yvonne moved from film into television, where she appeared in many shows including Man With a Camera, Wagon Train, and The Man from U.N.C.L.E. More famously she played “Marta” (a green skinned Orion) in the third series Star Trek episode entitled “Whom Gods Destroy” in 1968.

1967 she was »

- Tom Stockman

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Monica Lewis, Actress, Singer, Dies at 93

12 June 2015 1:13 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Monica Lewis, a former Benny Goodman vocalist who headlined the very first broadcast of “The Ed Sullivan Show,” was the voice of the popular Chiquita Banana cartoons, clowned opposite Jerry Lewis, Red Skelton and Danny Kaye, and had co-starring roles in such films as “Earthquake,” “Airport 1975” and “The ConcordeAirport ’79,” died on June 12 of natural causes at her apartment in Woodland Hills, Calif. She was 93.

Lewis was born in Chicago to a musical family headed by her father Leon Lewis, who was a symphonic composer and conductor. Her mother Jessica sang with the Chicago Opera Company and her sister Barbara was an accomplished classical pianist. Her brother Marlo became head of variety for CBS-tv and created Ed Sullivan’s “Toast of the Town” show.

Monica studied voice with her mother from the time she was a toddler, but when the family lost everything during the Depression, they moved to New York to start over. »

- Variety Staff

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Monica Lewis, Actress Who Sang in Chiquita Banana Cartoons, Dies at 93

12 June 2015 1:13 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Monica Lewis, a former Benny Goodman vocalist who headlined the very first broadcast of “The Ed Sullivan Show,” was the voice of the popular Chiquita Banana cartoons, clowned opposite Jerry Lewis, Red Skelton and Danny Kaye, and had roles in such films as “Earthquake,” “Airport 1975” and “The ConcordeAirport ’79,” died on June 12 of natural causes at her apartment in Woodland Hills, Calif. She was 93.

Lewis was born in Chicago to a musical family. Her father Leon Lewis was a symphonic composer and conductor; her mother Jessica sang with the Chicago Opera Company and her sister Barbara was a classical pianist. Her brother Marlo became head of variety for CBS-tv and created Ed Sullivan’s “Toast of the Town” show.

Monica studied voice with her mother from the time she was a toddler, but when the family lost everything during the Depression, they moved to New York to start over. »

- Variety Staff

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Simon Pegg Says Paramount Worried Original Star Trek Beyond Draft Was “Too Star Trek-y”

20 May 2015 1:07 PM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

Simon Pegg won the hearts and minds of nerds long ago, but the Shaun of the Dead actor keeps racking up impressive achievements that keep him at the epicenter of everything geeky in Hollywood. Currently, the actor is co-writing the script for Star Trek 3 (believed to be titled Star Trek Beyond), in which he’ll also reprise the role of Scotty, and trying to strike a balance between the more commercial feel of J.J. Abrams’ big-screen predecessors (2009’s Star Trek and 2013’s Star Trek Into Darkness) with the more adventurous tone of the original series.

Speaking with Radio Times, Pegg revealed that it hasn’t been easy getting the script right for the threequel. Before he came aboard, Paramount had some odd concerns with Roberto Orci’s treatment for the film (last year, the producer had convinced the studio to let him direct the pic on the condition that »

- Isaac Feldberg

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James Best, Sheriff on ‘Dukes of Hazzard,’ Dies at 88

7 April 2015 2:54 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

James Best, a character actor best known for his role as bumbling Sheriff Rosco P. Coltrane on CBS comedy “The Dukes of Hazzard,” died in Hickory, N.C., on April 6 from complications of pneumonia. He was 88.

The Dukes of Hazzard” ran from 1979-85. Best also voiced the character of Sheriff Coltrane on the 1983 animated series “The Dukes,” reprised the role for reunion movies in 1997 and 2000 and again voiced the character for videogames in 1999 and 2004.

Best was set to appear in the movie “Old Soldiers,” also starring Jake Busey, Doris Roberts, Rance Howard, Hugh O’Brian and Clifton James, but that movie is reported to be in pre-production. Best’s most recent completed project was the 2013 TV movie “The Sweeter Side of Life.”

The actor played the sheriff in the beloved 1972 Martin Ritt film “Sounder,” appeared in 1976 film “Ode to Billy Joe,” had a supporting role in Peter Bogdanovich’s “Nickelodeon »

- Carmel Dagan

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James Best, Sheriff on ‘Dukes of Hazzard,’ Dies at 88

7 April 2015 2:54 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

James Best, a character actor best known for his role as bumbling Sheriff Rosco P. Coltrane on CBS comedy “The Dukes of Hazzard,” died in Hickory, N.C., on April 6 from complications of pneumonia. He was 88.

The Dukes of Hazzard” ran from 1979-85. Best also voiced the character of Sheriff Coltrane on the 1983 animated series “The Dukes,” reprised the role for reunion movies in 1997 and 2000 and again voiced the character for videogames in 1999 and 2004.

Best was set to appear in the movie “Old Soldiers,” also starring Jake Busey, Doris Roberts, Rance Howard, Hugh O’Brian and Clifton James, but that movie is reported to be in pre-production. Best’s most recent completed project was the 2013 TV movie “The Sweeter Side of Life.”

The actor played the sheriff in the beloved 1972 Martin Ritt film “Sounder,” appeared in 1976 film “Ode to Billy Joe,” had a supporting role in Peter Bogdanovich’s “Nickelodeon »

- Carmel Dagan

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'Dukes of Hazzard' Star James Best Passes Away at 88

7 April 2015 12:18 PM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

James Best, who played the memorable Sherrif Roscoe P. Coltrane on the hit TV series The Dukes of Hazzard, passed away yesterday at the age of 88 from complications of pneumonia. The actor played Roscoe P. Coltrane, the longtime rival to the Duke brothers, on all seven seasons of The Dukes of Hazzard, which ran from 1979 to 1985.

The actor was raised in Indiana and ended up moving to New York after serving in World War II. He found work as a fashion model which lead to him being discoverd by a casting agent. He became a contract player for Universal Pictures. He appeared in a number of films throughout the 1950s such as Winchester '73 alongside James Stewart and The Cimarron Kid with Audie Murphy. He ended up working in both TV and film throughout the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s, appearing in notable episodes of The Twilight Zone, Wagon Train and Have Gun - Will Travel, »

- MovieWeb

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Leonard Nimoy: 14 Things You Didn’t Know About His Career

28 February 2015 9:31 AM, PST | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Leonard Nimoy leaves a proud legacy as an actor, teacher, philanthropist and advocate for many of the qualities he infused in his enduring alter-ego, the science- and logic-loving Mr. Spock of “Star Trek.”

But who knew Nimoy once owned a pet shop in Canoga Park? Or that he teamed with Vic Morrow in 1962 to produce an indie film based on Jean Genet’s edgy play “Deathwatch.” Or that he paid for and narrated a TV special, “If The Mind Is Free,” that aired only in Chicago to raise money for the city’s St. Mary High School.

Here are 14 intriguing tidbits about Nimoy’s life and work as culled from the pages of Variety.

The first reference of “Leonard Nemoy,” as he was billed in some of his earliest appearances, came in the Oct. 17, 1950, edition noting that he had joined the cast of the C-grade indie film “Queen for a Day. »

- Cynthia Littleton

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Leonard Nimoy lived long and prospered

27 February 2015 5:20 PM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Film Nerd 2.0 has become one of the things I am most closely identified with, which is fine by me. I think there is real value in talking about how we introduce media to our children, and there's absolutely value in talking about how that media affects them. It wasn't a column that I consciously set out to create, though. It just sort of gradually became clear that it was something I wanted to write, and the turning point, the moment of actual creation, was all because of "Star Trek." For Toshi, the 2009 film was not just his entry point to "Star Trek," but also his entry point to movies in general. When I took him to the theater to see the film, he stood the entire time, and he didn't want to be touched or spoken to or distracted in any way. He was fascinated, and he had a million questions afterwards. »

- Drew McWeeny

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Entertainment News: Leonard Nimoy, Spock of ‘Star Trek,’ Dies at 83

27 February 2015 12:16 PM, PST | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Los Angeles – The actor who created one of the greatest pop-culture characters in TV and film history has passed away. Leonard Nimoy will always be known for the role of Mr. Spock, science officer for the USS Enterprise of the “Star Trek” TV and film series. He died of pulmonary disease on Feb. 27, 2015, according to his wife Susan. He was 83.

Leonard Nimoy as Mr. Spock in ‘Star Trek’ (2009)

Photo credit: Paramount Pictures

The legacy of “Star Trek” had much to do with Nimoy’s approach to the character of Spock. The backstory of the half-human, half-Vulcan character was one of logic over conflict, yet his character could always be relied on when situations got confrontational. For three seasons in the 1960s and in rerun heaven, the voyage of the Starship Enterprise captivated viewers and was resurrected in a highly popular film series. Nimoy also was a photographer, director, writer and »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

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Leonard Nimoy, ‘Star Trek’s’ Spock, Dies at 83

27 February 2015 9:21 AM, PST | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Leonard Nimoy lived up to his longtime catchphrase: Live long and prosper. Having achieved success in many arenas during his lifetime, the actor, director, writer and photographer died Friday in Los Angeles of end-stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. He was 83.

Most widely known for his performance as half-human, half-Vulcan science officer Spock on the classic sci-fi TV show “Star Trek” and its many subsequent film and videogame incarnations, Nimoy was also a successful director, helming “Star Trek” pics “The Search for Spock” and “The Voyage Home,” as well as non-“Star Trek” fare; an accomplished stage actor; a published writer and poet; and a noted photographer. He also dabbled in singing and songwriting.

But despite his varied talents, Nimoy will forever be linked with the logical Mr. Spock. Spotted by “Star Trek” creator Gene Roddenberry when he appeared on Roddenberry’s NBC Marine Corps. skein “The Lieutenant,” Nimoy was offered »

- Terry Flores

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Leonard Nimoy, ‘Star Trek’s’ Spock, Dies at 83

27 February 2015 9:21 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Leonard Nimoy lived up to his longtime catchphrase: Live long and prosper. Having achieved success in many arenas during his lifetime, the actor, director, writer and photographer has died at age 83. His wife, Susan Bay Nimoy, reportedly confirmed his death to the New York Times, saying the cause was end-stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Most widely known for his performance as half-human, half-Vulcan science officer Spock on the classic sci-fi TV show “Star Trek” and its many subsequent film and videogame incarnations, Nimoy was also a successful director, helming “Star Trek” pics “The Search for Spock” and “The Voyage Home,” as well as non-“Star Trek” fare; an accomplished stage actor; a published writer and poet; and a noted photographer. He also dabbled in singing and songwriting.

But despite his varied talents, Nimoy will forever be linked with the logical Mr. Spock. Spotted by “Star Trek” creator Gene Roddenberry when »

- Terry Flores

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

12 items from 2015


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