Nick Charles, an ex-private detective, marries Nora and lives in a luxurious Park Avenue apartment in New York City. Nick's former underworld friends still hang around and get him involved ... See full summary »
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2   1  
1959   1958   1957  
Nominated for 1 Primetime Emmy. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete series cast summary:
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 Nick Charles (72 episodes, 1957-1959)
...
 Nora Charles / ... (72 episodes, 1957-1959)
Asta ...
 Asta (72 episodes, 1957-1959)
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Storyline

Nick Charles, an ex-private detective, marries Nora and lives in a luxurious Park Avenue apartment in New York City. Nick's former underworld friends still hang around and get him involved in a number of crimes that he solves. Beatrice Dane is a beautiful con artist using the alias "Blondie Collins" and Nora finds it difficult to be hospitable to her. Written by J.E. McKillop <jmckillo@notes.cc.bellcore.com>

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Genres:

Comedy | Mystery

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Release Date:

20 September 1957 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Ella, él y asta  »

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(Westrex Recording System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Peter Lawford's mother, Mary Somerville, appeared as society columnist in the episode "Ring Around Rosie". See more »

Connections

Featured in MGM: When the Lion Roars (1992) See more »

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User Reviews

 
LOVED the TV version!
24 March 2010 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

Never saw the original Thin Man until recently when I bought the set, ALL of the William Powell and Myrna Loy films. I loved them but felt oddly disappointed, and didn't know why. Also, the series that I thought I loved seemed oddly unfamiliar.

There is ONE episode of the Lawford/Kirk TV Thin Man on the final disk, the one that includes a biography of Powell, another of Loy. Seeing this single episode made me realize that my nostalgia for The Thin Man was actually for the TV series, not the original. I had never before seen the original. Seeing that single episode of the Kirk/Lawford TV version REALLY brought it all back! It was light yet engrossing, with good production values for the day and a plot that really kept my attention.

Both versions have great charm, but I still like the TV series better. If Acorn or Movies Unlimited or some such company were to issue a set of the TV version, I'd buy it in a heartbeat! IF ANYONE READING THIS IS IN THE OLD MOVIE DVD INDUSTRY, PLEASE OFFER THIS!


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