"Perry Mason"
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany creditsepisode listepisodes castepisode ratings... by rating... by votes
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsmessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summaryplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Connect with IMDb



2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006

1-20 of 26 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


Actor Booth Colman Dies at 91

21 December 2014 11:29 AM, PST | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Booth Colman, who had a long career as an actor including the role of ape scientist Dr. Zaius in the 1970s “Planet of the Apes” TV series, died in his sleep on Dec. 15 in Los Angeles. He was 91.

Colman was a Shakespearean authority who essayed mostly dramatic roles. He had a gravitas that was well-used in his many performances as authority figures, such as doctors, clergymen, scientists and attorneys. Though he was never a comedian, he appeared in comedies and treasured his friendship with classic performer Stan Laurel of Laurel & Hardy. (Colman is pictured above with Lois Laurel, the daughter of Stan Laurel.)

Though he worked in film — with more than 50 bigscreen appearances — and onstage, Colman was best known for his work on television. He racked up many credits, from the early days of TV in the 1950s through 2008.

He guested, often multiple times, on series including “Gunsmoke,” “Perry Mason, »

- Carmel Dagan

Permalink | Report a problem


Actor Booth Colman Dies at 91

21 December 2014 11:29 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Booth Colman, who had a long career as an actor including the role of ape scientist Dr. Zaius in the 1970s “Planet of the Apes” TV series, died in his sleep on Dec. 15 in Los Angeles. He was 91.

Colman was a Shakespearean authority who essayed mostly dramatic roles. He had a gravitas that was well-used in his many performances as authority figures, such as doctors, clergymen, scientists and attorneys. Though he was never a comedian, he appeared in comedies and treasured his friendship with classic performer Stan Laurel of Laurel & Hardy. (Colman is pictured above with Lois Laurel, the daughter of Stan Laurel.)

Though he worked in film — with more than 50 bigscreen appearances — and onstage, Colman was best known for his work on television. He racked up many credits, from the early days of TV in the 1950s through 2008.

He guested, often multiple times, on series including “Gunsmoke,” “Perry Mason, »

- Carmel Dagan

Permalink | Report a problem


Former Miss America, Actress Mary Ann Mobley Dies at 75

9 December 2014 5:20 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Mary Ann Mobley, actress and former Miss America, has died in Beverly Hills after a long battle with breast cancer. She was 75.

Mobley, a native of Mississippi, was crowned Miss America in 1959. After studying acting with Lee Strasberg, she appeared on a 1963 episode of Aaron Spelling’s “Burke’s Law,” which led to a breakout role opposite Elvis Presley in “Girl Happy” in 1965. She and Elvis also starred in “Harum Scarum” later that same year. Her other notable film roles include “Get Yourself a College Girl” and “Young Dillinger.”

In addition to her film career, Mobley appeared on several television shows, including “Perry Mason,” “Fantasy Island,” “The Partridge Family” and “Diff’rent Strokes,” and was a recurring panelist on game show “Match Game.” She also performed on Broadway and traveled to Africa and Southeast Asia to make documentary films about homeless and starving children.

Actor Gary Collins and Mobley were »

- Marianne Zumberge

Permalink | Report a problem


Western Director Andrew V. McLaglen Dies at 94

3 September 2014 10:33 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Director Andrew V. McLaglen, best known for his work on Westerns including John Wayne’s “McLintock!” and James Stewart’s “Shenandoah,” has died at the age of 94.

According to the Journal of the San Juan Islands, McLaglen died on Saturday, Aug. 30 at his home in Friday Harbor on San Juan Island, Wa. A cause of death was not reported.

McLaglen was born in England to Oscar-winning actor Victor McLaglen (“The Informer”) and Enid Lamont in 1920, and moved to Hollywood with his family soon after his birth.

Before transitioning to the director’s chair with “Gun the Man Down” in 1956, he served as an assistant director on 14 pics, including Wayne films such as “Big Jim McLain,” “Island in the Sky” and “Blood Alley.” He would go on to direct Wayne in four Westerns — “McLintock,” “The Undefeated,” “Chisum” and “Cahill U.S. Marshal” — as well as action movie “Hellfighters.” McLaglen served as unit »

- Variety Staff

Permalink | Report a problem


Western Director Andrew V. McLaglen Dies at 94

3 September 2014 10:33 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Director Andrew V. McLaglen, best known for his work on Westerns including John Wayne’s “McLintock!” and James Stewart’s “Shenandoah,” has died at the age of 94.

According to the Journal of the San Juan Islands, McLaglen died on Saturday, Aug. 30 at his home in Friday Harbor on San Juan Island, Wa. A cause of death was not reported.

McLaglen was born in England to Oscar-winning actor Victor McLaglen (“The Informer”) and Enid Lamont in 1920, and moved to Hollywood with his family soon after his birth.

Before transitioning to the director’s chair with “Gun the Man Down” in 1956, he served as an assistant director on 14 pics, including Wayne films such as “Big Jim McLain,” “Island in the Sky” and “Blood Alley.” He would go on to direct Wayne in four Westerns — “McLintock,” “The Undefeated,” “Chisum” and “Cahill U.S. Marshal” — as well as action movie “Hellfighters.” McLaglen served as unit »

- Variety Staff

Permalink | Report a problem


Brian G. Hutton 1935 - 2014

22 August 2014 3:20 AM, PDT | EmpireOnline | See recent EmpireOnline news »

Brian G. Hutton, the director of classic war films Where Eagles Dare and Kelly’s Heroes, has died. He was believed to be 79.Born in 1935, the New Yorker had a brief acting career before migrating to the other side of the camera. He studied acting at Elia Kazan’s famous Actors Studio in Hell’s Kitchen, before heading to the West Coast under the patronage of legendary Casablanca producer Hal Wallis.Arriving in Los Angeles, he quickly scored theatre gigs, staging plays and teaching acting at the Beverly Hills Playhouse. During the mid-to-late ‘50s he landed acting roles in TV staples like Gunsmoke and Perry Mason, as well as Kirk Douglas Western Gunfight At The O.K. Corral and Elvis musical King Creole.Soon after Hutton came to the attention of Universal Studios’ New Horizons programme. The studio’s low-budget production scheme for young directors afforded him his first experience of directing work, »

Permalink | Report a problem


Brian G. Hutton, Director of ‘Where Eagles Dare,’ ‘Kelly’s Heroes,’ Dies at 79

20 August 2014 1:16 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Brian G. Hutton, who directed Clint Eastwood in the WWII actioners “Where Eagles Dare” (1968) and “Kelly’s Heroes” (1970) and also directed Elizabeth Taylor in two films, has died. He was 79.

Where Eagles Dare,” a thriller based on the Alistair MacLean novel, also starred Richard Burton, while “Kelly Heroes,” a heist film masquerading as a war film, sported a large ensemble cast that included Telly Savalas, Don Rickles, Carroll O’Connor and Donald Sutherland.

Hutton’s 1972 drama “X, Y and Zee” starred Elizabeth Taylor, Michael Caine and Susannah York concerned an an architect, his mistress, and the wife intent on breaking them at all costs. Follow-up film “Night Watch,” starring Taylor and Laurence Harvey, was a thriller.

Hutton did not direct again until 1980’s Lawrence Sanders adaptation “The First Deadly Sin,” starring Frank Sinatra as a New York police detective and Faye Dunaway his dying wife.

His final directorial effort was »

- Carmel Dagan

Permalink | Report a problem


Brian G. Hutton, Director of ‘Where Eagles Dare,’ ‘Kelly’s Heroes,’ Dies at 79

20 August 2014 1:16 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Brian G. Hutton, who directed Clint Eastwood in the WWII actioners “Where Eagles Dare” (1968) and “Kelly’s Heroes” (1970) and also directed Elizabeth Taylor in two films, has died. He was 79.

Where Eagles Dare,” a thriller based on the Alistair MacLean novel, also starred Richard Burton, while “Kelly Heroes,” a heist film masquerading as a war film, sported a large ensemble cast that included Telly Savalas, Don Rickles, Carroll O’Connor and Donald Sutherland.

Hutton’s 1972 drama “X, Y and Zee” starred Elizabeth Taylor, Michael Caine and Susannah York concerned an an architect, his mistress, and the wife intent on breaking them at all costs. Follow-up film “Night Watch,” starring Taylor and Laurence Harvey, was a thriller.

Hutton did not direct again until 1980’s Lawrence Sanders adaptation “The First Deadly Sin,” starring Frank Sinatra as a New York police detective and Faye Dunaway his dying wife.

His final directorial effort was »

- Carmel Dagan

Permalink | Report a problem


Norma McCarty, Actress and Wife of Ed Wood, Dies at 93

18 August 2014 1:05 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Norma McCarty, wife of the late writer-director Ed Wood, who has long had a cult following, and an actress who performed in Wood’s films as well as others, died June 27 at a Newhall, Calif., hospital, it was revealed. She was 93.

McCarty gained fame for playing the stewardess Edith in her husband’s 1959 film “Plan 9 From Outer Space.” The low-budget sci-fi thriller, which was about extraterrestrial beings seeking to stop humans from creating a doomsday weapon, flopped in the box office and was dubbed “the worst movie ever made,” but over the years there have been fans who have celebrated the film.

She also appeared on TV in “The Incredibly Strange Film Show” and on episodes of “Perry Mason,” “Superman” and “The Andy Griffith Show.”

McCarty met her filmmaker husband on the studio lot while she was working on CBS’ “Gunsmoke,” according to her son. They were married in »

- Jordyn Holman

Permalink | Report a problem


Does Emmy Favor the White Collar Worker?

7 August 2014 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Back in the ’30s, a report on small towns rejecting rube feature films inspired an unforgettable Variety headline: “Stix Nix Hick Pix.”

Almost a century later, another group seems to be giving the raspberry to the proletariat. Emmy voters’ anointed 2014 lead actors for drama and comedy alike are distinctly cut from urban, white-collar cloth.

Polished operators pop up in dramas (Jon Hamm and Kevin Spacey in “Mad Men” and “House of Cards,” respectively) and comedies (sleazy consultant Don Cheadle in “House of Lies”; Matt LeBlanc as himself in “Episodes”).

Jim Parsons, brilliant scientist in “The Big Bang Theory”; chemistry teacher-turned-meth kingpin Bryan Cranston in “Breaking Bad”; news anchor Jeff Daniels in “The Newsroom”; Gotham standup Louis C.K.; slick cop Woody Harrelson in “True Detective” — one and all, these fellows work much more with their minds than their hands.

You’ll find dirty fingernails among Ricky Gervais’ child-man “Derek,” and sitting-in-their-own »

- Bob Verini

Permalink | Report a problem


In memoriam: James Shigeta

29 July 2014 12:15 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

We pay tribute to the actor James Shigeta, famous for his roles in Flower Drum Song, Die Hard, and a legion other turns on stage and TV.

For a generation of moviegoers, James Shigeta will be immediately recognisable as Joseph Takagi, the Nakatomi Corporation boss who's ruthlessly despatched by Alan Rickman's sneering villain in the 1988 hit, Die Hard. But there was so much more to Shigeta than John McTiernan's action classic - that appearance was, in fact, but one of many in a long and fruitful career on stage, television and the silver screen.

Born in Hawaii in 1933, Shigeta embarked on a singing career after winning first place in a TV show called Original Amateur Hour. His subsequent success was such that a lengthy run of appearances in Tokyo musicals left him with the nickname, The Frank Sinatra of Japan.

Returning to America in the late 1950s, Shigeta »

- ryanlambie

Permalink | Report a problem


Die Hard actor James Shigeta dies, aged 81

28 July 2014 8:57 PM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Asian-American actor James Shigeta has died, aged 81.

Shigeta made several television and movie appearances throughout his career, notably in the first Die Hard film.

The actor played executive Joseph Takagi in the 1988 movie, who is shot by Hans Gruber (Alan Rickman) after refusing to surrender the security code to the skyscraper's bank vault.

Prior to Die Hard, Shigeta also starred in the 1961 film adaptation of Broadway musical Flower Drum Song as Wang Ta.

The Honolulu-born actor also appeared in Paradise, Hawaiian Style, Midway and Lost Horizon.

His television credits include Hawaii 5-0, Perry Mason, Mission: Impossible, Ironside, and Beverly Hills 90210. »

Permalink | Report a problem


James Shigeta, Star of ‘Flower Drum Song’ and ‘Die Hard’ Co-Star, Dies at 81

28 July 2014 7:29 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

James Shigeta, one of the first prominent Asian-American actors, who co-starred in “Die Hard” and starred in “Flower Drum Song,” died Monday at 81.

Though largely a TV actor who guest-starred on dozens of shows, he appeared memorably in hit 1988 action film “Die Hard,” in which he played executive Joseph Takagi, who refuses to give up the security code to the skyscraper’s bank vault when a group of German terrorists seizes the building. He was shot in the head by the group’s leader, Hans Gruber, played by Alan Rickman.

In the big-budget WWII film “Midway” (1976), which told the story of the key battle from both American and Japanese points of view, Shigeta was featured prominently in the role of Vice Admiral Nagumo, whose despair at Japan’s loss in the battle is moving.

The actor had most recently appeared in the 2009 film “The People I’ve Slept With,” directed by Quentin Lee. »

- Pat Saperstein

Permalink | Report a problem


James Shigeta, Star of ‘Flower Drum Song’ and ‘Die Hard’ Co-Star, Dies at 81

28 July 2014 7:29 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

James Shigeta, one of the first prominent Asian-American actors, who co-starred in “Die Hard” and starred in “Flower Drum Song,” died Monday at 81.

Though largely a TV actor who guest-starred on dozens of shows, he appeared memorably in hit 1988 action film “Die Hard,” in which he played executive Joseph Takagi, who refuses to give up the security code to the skyscraper’s bank vault when a group of German terrorists seizes the building. He was shot in the head by the group’s leader, Hans Gruber, played by Alan Rickman.

In the big-budget WWII film “Midway” (1976), which told the story of the key battle from both American and Japanese points of view, Shigeta was featured prominently in the role of Vice Admiral Nagumo, whose despair at Japan’s loss in the battle is moving.

The actor had most recently appeared in the 2009 film “The People I’ve Slept With,” directed by Quentin Lee. »

- Pat Saperstein

Permalink | Report a problem


Interview: We Dream of Barbara Eden at the ‘Hollywood Show’ Chicago

8 July 2014 9:35 AM, PDT | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Chicago – Next year will mark the 50th Anniversary of the seminal 1960s sitcom, “I Dream of Jeannie.” Unforgettable – for many reasons – was Barbara Eden, who portrayed a genie named Jeannie. Ms. Eden was at the “Hollywood Show” Chicago last year, and was interviewed by HollywoodChicago.com.

Eden was born Barbara Jean Morehead in Tucson, Arizona. After her family moved to the West Coast, Eden began singing, first in the church choir and eventually in night clubs. This led to acting and performance classes, including the City College of San Francisco and the San Francisco Conservatory of Music. After winning the title of Miss San Francisco, Eden moved to Los Angeles, and began a series of appearances on classic TV shows including “I Love Lucy,” “The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson,” “Perry Mason,” “Gunsmoke,” “Father Knows Best” and “The Andy Griffith Show.”

Barbara Eden at the “Hollywood Show Chicago” in 2013

Photo »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

Permalink | Report a problem


French Actor Jacques Bergerac, ‘Hypnotic Eye’ Star, Dies at 87

26 June 2014 12:49 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Jacques Bergerac, a French actor who made a name for himself in film and TV and was wed to some of Hollywood’s most sought-after actresses during the 1950s and ’60s, has died. He was 87.

Bergerac died June 15 at his home in Anglet in the Pyrenees-Atlantiques region of southwest France, according to French media reports. The actor appeared in the cult horror film “Hypnotic Eye” and musical romantic comedy “Gigi” alongside Gene Kelly and Leslie Caron.

Bergerac gained his U.S. citizenship in 1963 and married Oscar-winning actress Ginger Rogers when he was 26. Rogers was 16 years his senior. He left his law studies behind in France and returned to the U.S. with Rogers to pursue a career in acting.

When they first met in France Rogers landed him a screen test at MGM, which led to a role in “Twist of Fate” in 1954 with him playing her onscreen boyfriend.

After »

- Jordyn Holman

Permalink | Report a problem


Six of The Best Movie Courtroom Scenes

25 April 2014 4:00 AM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

The courtroom is the ultimate movie set. The elements of a criminal trial are effectively a scriptwriter’s ‘How To’ guide. The case for the prosecution is pure plot development; the conflict is inherent in two sides making completely opposing arguments. Main characters are set at loggerheads, motives are compromised and minor characters are wheeled in and out as witnesses at the writer’s beck and call. Finally, at its heart there is a mystery that can’t be solved until the judge bangs his gavel for the final time, or maybe just afterwards in a third act sting (see Jagged Edge, for example). It is no wonder Hollywood drags itself back to the courts time and time again.

The courtroom movie really came into prominence in the late 1950s and early 1960s, during the death-throes of monochrome film. Movies like Inherit The Wind, Anatomy of a Murder, 12 Angry Men, »

- Cai Ross

Permalink | Report a problem


Following Anderson's Death, Only Two Gwtw Performers Still Living

9 April 2014 7:40 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Gone with the Wind’ actress Mary Anderson dead at 96; also featured in Alfred Hitchcock thriller ‘LifeboatMary Anderson, an actress featured in both Gone with the Wind and Alfred Hitchcock’s adventure thriller Lifeboat, died following a series of small strokes on Sunday, April 6, 2014, while under hospice care in Toluca Lake/Burbank, northwest of downtown Los Angeles. Anderson, the widow of multiple Oscar-winning cinematographer Leon Shamroy, had turned 96 on April 3. Born in Birmingham, Alabama, in 1918, Mary Anderson was reportedly discovered by director George Cukor, at the time looking for an actress to play Scarlett O’Hara in David O. Selznick’s film version of Margaret Mitchell’s bestseller Gone with the Wind. Instead of Scarlett, eventually played by Vivien Leigh, Anderson was cast in the small role of Maybelle Merriwether — most of which reportedly ended up on the cutting-room floor. Cukor was later fired from the project; his replacement, Victor Fleming, »

- Andre Soares

Permalink | Report a problem


Blu-ray, DVD Release: Sleep, My Love

9 April 2014 1:31 PM, PDT | Disc Dish | See recent Disc Dish news »

Blu-ray & DVD Release Date: April 15, 2014

Price: DVD $24.95, Blu-ray $29.95

Studio: Olive Films

Don Ameche cozies up to Claudette Colbert in Sleep My Love.

With the 1948 film noir mystery Sleep, My Love, the great Douglas Sirk (All That Heaven Allows) directed the third and final teaming of Claudette Colbert (It Happened One Night) and Don Ameche (Cocoon), who previously appeared together in Mitchell Leisen’s Midnight and later in Sam Wood’s The Guest Wife).

The movie casts Colbert as Alison Courtland, a wealthy New York socialite who awakens on a Boston-bound train with no memory of how she got there. A kind, elderly woman helps Alison call her husband Richard (Ameche), who in the meantime had contacted a detective (Raymond Burr, TV’s Perry Mason) to help him find his missing wife. On the plane back home, Alison meets Bruce (Robert Cummings, The Devil and Miss Jones), who’s immediately enamored with her. »

- Laurence

Permalink | Report a problem


R.I.P. Richard Coogan, Early TV’s Original Captain Video

12 March 2014 8:47 PM, PDT | Deadline TV | See recent Deadline TV news »

The first man to play Captain Video — the Guardian of the Safety of the World! — in the early days of television died today in Los Angeles. Richard Coogan was 99. He starred on the first two seasons of Captain Video And His Video Rangers, the popular low-budget space opera that premiered in 1949 on the DuMont Network. The future-set series aired for a half-hour Monday through Friday, also on Saturdays in 1950, with a reported prop budget of 25 bucks a week. The jut-jawed Coogan played a scientific genius who invented radical weapons and led a vast network of defenders of good. The program was a favorite of The Honeymooners‘ Ralph Cramden and Ed Norton, who were card-carrying members of the Captain Video Space Rangers fan club. After leaving Captain Video, the New Jersey native starred on the CBS soap Love Of Life and toplined late-’50s Gold Rush drama The Californians. He also »

- THE DEADLINE TEAM

Permalink | Report a problem


2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006

1-20 of 26 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners