"Maverick"
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany creditsepisode listepisodes castepisode ratings... by rating... by votes
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsmessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summaryplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Connect with IMDb



2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

2 items from 2016


'Mission: Impossible': 15 Things You (Probably) Didn't Know About the Tom Cruise Blockbuster

24 May 2016 6:00 AM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

Before 1996, "Mission: Impossible" was a long-since-cancelled TV spy series, beloved by Boomers but forgotten by anyone younger. Today, of course, it's a popular Tom Cruise movie franchise, known for its twisty plotting and jaw-dropping stunt sequences, whose five installments to date have grossed $935 million in North America and $2.8 billion worldwide.

The change came, of course, with the release of Cruise's first "Mission: Impossible" 20 years ago, on May 22, 1996. Since then, Brian De Palma's clever, convoluted blockbuster has been watched and copied plenty. And while some of the spy franchise's secrets have become widely known, there are still some that have remained classified -- until now.

1. "Mission: Impossible" marked Cruise's debut as a producer. In a deal that would become his then-customary contract, he took no money up front but negotiated a lucrative percentage of the theatrical and video gross profits, reportedly as high as 22 percent. Cruise reportedly pocketed an estimated $70 million for the first "Mission. »

- Gary Susman

Permalink | Report a problem


Nancy Savoca Donates Personal Film Archives to University of Michigan Library

4 February 2016 11:54 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Read More: Interview with Nancy Savoca: Co-Writer and Director of 'Union Square' The University of Michigan has announced that filmmaker Nancy Savoca will donate her personal archives to the school's Mavericks and Makes Indie Film Collection. The archives will include a diverse range of her work, including drawings, budgets, research documents, drafts of screenplays, audio and video interviews, press photos, props and even a few notebooks from her high school film class. Savoca will be the first female "Maverick" in the collection, which houses an immense range of material from fellow filmmakers such as Orson Welles, Robert Altman, Alan Rudolph, John Sayles and Ira Deutchman. Savoca has been an independent filmmaker, working with her husband and partner Rich Guay, for more than 25 years. Her works includes "True Love" (which won the Grand Jury Prize at the inaugural 1989 Sundance Film Festival), "Household Saints," »

- Mike Lown

Permalink | Report a problem


2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

2 items from 2016


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners