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Leave It to Beaver (TV Series 1957–1963) Poster

(1957–1963)

Trivia

In the pilot episode, the part of "Frankie" was played by a young Harry Shearer.
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Although the series was still earning good ratings, its star, Jerry Mathers, wanted to retire from acting to focus on his education upon entering high school. As a result, it was agreed to halt production and the series became the first prime time American production to have a series finale.
This was in a way the first show to show a toilet and in a way it also wasn't. They didn't actually show the toilet pedestal and seat, but they did show the toilet tank and flush handle.
This show made its debut on the same day the Soviets launched Sputnik (4 October 1957)
Barbara Billingsley told an interviewer in 2007 the reason she always wore pearls on camera is because of a small indentation just above her sternum that didn't photograph well.
In addition to his role as Ward Cleaver, Hugh Beaumont also did some writing and directing for the series.
When filming was shifted to Universal's backlot (then known as Universal International) a new house was built. This house remained as a standing set and was later used for many other television programs and motion pictures. It is a popular attraction on Universal's Tour. More than forty years after the show ended, the still standing set is known as "The Cleaver House."
A popular rumor that surfaced about the show years later is that notorious rock legend Alice Cooper, in his younger years, portrayed Eddie Haskell on the show. This stems from a misinterpretation of an interview that Cooper had, in which he said that he was Eddie Haskell as a kid. He, of course, meant that he was similar in behavior and attitude to Haskell, Not that he portrayed him on the show.
Hugh Beaumont held a Master of Theology degree from the University of Southern California and was an ordained minister.
There are two indications that the Cleavers lived in Wisconsin. In one scene, Wally mentions the high school band is going to Madison to play for the governor. In another episode, the Cleavers are going to a pro football game and repeatedly refer to the Packers.
Richard Deacon's appearances as pompous Fred Rutherford diminished in the last season as he was also portraying Mel Cooley on the The Dick Van Dyke Show (1961) at the same time.
The pilot of the show, "It's a Small World", was first broadcast on April 23, 1957 on a syndicated anthology series, Studio 57 (1954). It did not have a laugh track nor an opening or closing theme. It never aired within the series itself. Max Showalter played Ward and Paul Sullivan played Wally. Sullivan was replaced because he experienced a sudden growth spurt after the series was picked up.
The house on Universal's backlot that was used for the exterior shots of the Cleavers' second home (in Season 3, after the move to ABC) was later used for the exterior shots of Marcus Welby's house. in Marcus Welby, M.D. (1969).
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Beaver's elementary school was Grant Ave. School, which was a grammar school, not an elementary school; meaning grades K-8.
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The character Eddie Haskell was ranked #2 in TV Guide's list of "TV's 10 Biggest Brats" (27 March 2005 issue).
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Tony Dow had never acted before and had no aspirations of becoming an actor when he was cast. Dow had accompanied a friend of his to the audition. He auditioned on a whim and got the part.
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The address of the first house the Cleavers owned in Mayfield was 485 Mapleton Drive, a reference to first season network CBS's then New York headquarters at 485 Madison Avenue. The address of their second home was 211 Pine Street.
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The character 'Ward Cleaver' was ranked #28 in TV Guide's list of the "50 Greatest TV Dads of All Time" (20 June 2004 issue).
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It seemed that Eddie Haskell rarely called others by their real names, preferring "hip" replacements like "Sam" to better fit his "cool" image. This happened more often towards the end of the series, particularly in Season 6. When talking about parents, his own or others, he often called them "Wardens". When addressing Beaver, he would use names like "Squirt", "Junior" or "Sonny". Of course, most of Eddie's alternate-name references, particularly "Sam", refer to Wally. The following list gives a rich portrait of just how varied the "alternate-name-calling" - always good-spirited - could be. (All references are Eddie speaking to Wally, unless otherwise noted.) In Leave It to Beaver: New Doctor (1958) : "Cut it out, Rock (Hudson) - who do you think you're kiddin'?" In Leave It to Beaver: The Hypnotist (1960) : "Muscles." In Leave It to Beaver: Beaver's Big Contest (1960) : "Come on, Charlie." In Leave It to Beaver: Chuckie's New Shoes (1960) : Eddie, mocking Wally's romantic relationships, refers to him as "Lover". In Leave It to Beaver: Beaver Goes in Business (1961) : "Look, Orville." In Leave It to Beaver: Beaver's Fear (1962) : In a rare instance of someone other than Eddie using an alternate name, Lumpy says to Wally, "Let's get with it, Gertrude." In Leave It to Beaver: Eddie Quits School (1962) : "Hold the inventory, Mortimer"; "They're not a pair of sneakers, Elwood"; and "Don't get hasty, Gertrude." In Leave It to Beaver: Beaver's Laundry (1962) : "I'm with you, Claude"; and turnabout's fair play, when Wally says to Eddie, "Start moppin', Sam." In Leave It to Beaver: Lumpy's Car Trouble (1962) : "But Agnes, this is a short cut"; and "Relax, Clyde." In Leave It to Beaver: The Yard Birds (1962) : referring to yard work: "Come on Moe, drop the hoe"; and "Come on, Isabel." In Leave It to Beaver: A Night in the Woods (1962) : "Look, Davy Crockett"; "Hang on to your Stetson, Gretchen"; and "Hold it, Maisie." In Leave It to Beaver: Un-Togetherness (1962) : "I wanted to see you, too, Gwendolyn." In Leave It to Beaver: Wally's Dinner Date (1962) : "I hate to say this, Gertrude." In Leave It to Beaver: Eddie, the Businessman (1962) : "Let's go, Cornelius"; "Look, Elwood"; and "Don't get excited, Gladys." In Leave It to Beaver: The Party Spoiler (1962) : arriving at Wally's party: "Hey, where's the band, Lionel?"; in the kitchen with Beaver: "Hey, Duncan Hines, get your grubby little paws off the food"; "Very funny, Leroy"; and "Look, Clyde." In Leave It to Beaver: The Mustache (1963) : "You're out, Clyde - o-u-g-h-t, out!" In Leave It to Beaver: Wally Buys a Car (1963) : "Hi, Sam Benedict." In Leave It to Beaver: The Parking Attendants (1963) : to Beaver: "You stay out of this, Boy Creep"; and to Wally: "Kidding, Alice, kidding." In Leave It to Beaver: More Blessed to Give (1963) : to Gilbert: "You stay out of this, Hydrant-Head"; "Remind me to tell your mother what a good cook she is, Homer"; to Beaver: "Wait a minute, Clyde"; also to Beaver: "You better head for the hills, Sir Lancelot." In Leave It to Beaver: The Credit Card (1963) : "Listen, Gertrude"; "No Hurry, Elwood"; "What da ya say, Stella"; and "OK, Gertrude, heh, heh, heh." In Leave It to Beaver: Box Office Attraction (1963) : "Look, Mr Peepers"; and "I'll see you in the car, Rodney." In Leave It to Beaver: Lumpy's Scholarship (1963) : "You gotta keep on the ball, Irma." In Leave It to Beaver: The Silent Treatment (1963) : to Beaver: "You're all right, Charlie." In Leave It to Beaver: Wally and the Fraternity (1963) : "Hold it, Alvin. hold it." In Leave It to Beaver: The All-Night Party (1963) : to Lumpy: "Come on, Fat Stuff."
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It was once stated that the Cleavers lived 30 miles from the coast.
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The car, driven by Ward, down the driveway in the opening credits of the final season, had the rear window taken out to prevent glare.
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The show's situations were based on the experiences of the writers' children. Joe Connelly based Beaver and Wally on his own sons while Eddie and Larry were based on their friends. Connelly would take the boys out and record their conversations in his notebook.
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Jerry Mathers wore his Cub Scout uniform to his audition. During the audition, he told the casting directors that he was anxious to leave for his den meeting. The producers were charmed with Mathers' innocent candor and cast him in the title role.
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Sponsors of "Leave It to Beaver" include General Electric Lightbulbs and Purina Dog Chow.
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Wally's car was a 1953 Chevrolet Bel-Air convertible. Eddie drove a 1947 Dodge, and Lumpy drove a 1940 Ford convertible.
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Edgar Buchanan, who appeared as the title character in Leave It to Beaver: Captain Jack (1957), would later return as Wally and Beaver's (and Ward's) Uncle Billy.
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The name of the state Mayfield was in was never mentioned, although it was said to be somewhere in the Midwest. But in one episode, the Beaver wanted to earn money with a paper route, to join-in with a friend to buy a surf board. That would suggest Mayfield is near the ocean.
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Larry Mondello's sister, although talked about, is never shown. His father is shown in one episode when all the kids gather back stage after the school play when Larry played a hop toad.
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The show's low-key style of humor was on purpose. According to Tony Dow, "if any line got too much of a laugh, they'd take it out. They didn't want a big laugh; they wanted chuckles."
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Eddie Haskell was the King of Cool, or at least he tried to project that image. In addition to calling everyone by random names (noted elsewhere on this Trivia page), he would often break into jazzy song quotes. One of his favorites was "C'est si bon" (composed in 1947 by Henri Betti with the lyrics by André Hornez, and "covered" by literally scores of singers during the 1950s and 1960s). In two episodes of Season 3 (Leave It to Beaver: The Hypnotist (1960) and Leave It to Beaver: Wally's Play (1960)) he is heard singing, "Baby won't you please come home/Your lovin' daddy's all alone". The words are from a song written in 1919 by Charles Garfield (with the possible assistance of Clarence Williams). Eddie may be "quoting" either the Frank Sinatra (1957) version or the Ricky Nelson recording (1960) of the song.
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Ward made at least four references to having attended high school in Shaker Heights, a town located between Mayfield and Cleveland, rendering yet another suggestion that Mayfield was most likely in Ohio.
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In the first two seasons of this show, it seemed that everyone in Mayfield, including the Cleavers, drove a product of the Ford Motor Company. Beginning in Season 3, apparently everyone went out and bought a new Chrysler Corporation automobile.
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Barbara Billingsley (June Cleaver), Hugh Beaumont (Ward Cleaver), Tony Dow (Wally Cleaver) and Jerry Mathers (Theodore "Beaver" Cleaver) appeared in all 234 episodes of the series.
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Produced by Gomalco Productions (1957-61) and Kayro Productions (1961-63) in association with Revue Productions. Produced at Republic Studios (1957-59) and Universal-International Studios (1959-63). Originally syndicated by MCA-TV, more recently by Program Exchange.
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The town of Mayfield, like the Cleaver family and virtually all of their friends, was thoroughly Caucasian, a trend that was well-established in television at the time (but about to begin changing). Among the rare exceptions in the Beaver series were the Varela family, whose son Chuey (Alan Roberts Costello) was Beaver's friend, and, like his parents, spoke only Spanish (Chuey's father was a diplomat from an unspecified South American country); the episode was Leave It to Beaver: Beaver and Chuey (1958). Another exception, this one a bit more stereotyped (again, typical of the era) was the African-American maid (played by Kim Hamilton) at the Langley home during the wedding reception in Leave It to Beaver: The Parking Attendants (1963).
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No episodes in the entire series featured snow or snowfall.
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It was revealed in Still the Beaver (1983) that Ward Cleaver died in 1977.
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See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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