The misadventures of a suburban boy, family and friends.
Reviews
Popularity
1,020 ( 527)

Watch Now

on Amazon Video

ON DISC

Episodes

Seasons


Years



6   5   4   3   2   1  
1963   1962   1961   1960   1959   1958   … See all »
Nominated for 2 Primetime Emmys. Another 3 wins & 2 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Learn more

People who liked this also liked... 

The Andy Griffith Show (1960–1968)
Comedy | Family
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.3/10 X  

Widower Sheriff Andy and his son Opie live with Andy's Aunt Bee in Mayberry NC. With virtually no crimes to solve, most of Andy's time is spent philosophizing and calming down his cousin Deputy Barney.

Stars: Andy Griffith, Ron Howard, Don Knotts
The Beverly Hillbillies (1962–1971)
Comedy | Family
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.2/10 X  

A nouveau riche hillbilly family moves to Beverly Hills and shakes up the privileged society with their hayseed ways.

Stars: Buddy Ebsen, Donna Douglas, Irene Ryan
Green Acres (1965–1971)
Comedy | Family
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.4/10 X  

A New York City attorney and his wife attempt to live as genteel farmers in the bizarre community of Hooterville.

Stars: Eddie Albert, Eva Gabor, Tom Lester
The Dick Van Dyke Show (1961–1966)
Comedy | Family
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.4/10 X  

The misadventures of a TV writer both at work and at home.

Stars: Dick Van Dyke, Mary Tyler Moore, Rose Marie
My Three Sons (1960–1972)
Comedy | Family
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.1/10 X  

Widower Steve Douglas raises three sons with the help of his father-in-law, and is later aided by the boys' great-uncle. An adopted son, a stepdaughter, wives, and another generation of sons join the loving family in later seasons.

Stars: Fred MacMurray, Stanley Livingston, Don Grady
The Brady Bunch (1969–1974)
Comedy | Family
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.7/10 X  

The misadventures of a large family united when two widowed people married.

Stars: Robert Reed, Florence Henderson, Ann B. Davis
Gilligan's Island (1964–1967)
Comedy | Family
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.4/10 X  

Seven men and women are stranded on an uncharted island following a torrential storm.

Stars: Bob Denver, Alan Hale Jr., Jim Backus
Laverne & Shirley (1976–1983)
Comedy | Family
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.9/10 X  

The misadventures of two single women in the 1950s and '60s.

Stars: Penny Marshall, Cindy Williams, David L. Lander
I Dream of Jeannie (1965–1970)
Comedy | Family | Fantasy
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.5/10 X  

A United States astronaut finds his life vastly complicated when he stumbles on to a bottle containing a female genie.

Stars: Barbara Eden, Larry Hagman, Bill Daily
I Love Lucy (1951–1957)
Comedy | Family
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.4/10 X  

A daffy woman constantly strives to become a star along with her bandleader husband and gets herself in the strangest situations.

Stars: Lucille Ball, Desi Arnaz, Vivian Vance
Mister Ed (1958–1966)
Comedy | Family | Fantasy
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.1/10 X  

Mister Ed is a horse who is owned by Wilbur Post. Mister Ed is not just any horse, he talks to Wilbur! But this gets Wilbur in all kinds of trouble because Mister Ed won't talk to anyone ... See full summary »

Stars: Allan Lane, Alan Young, Connie Hines
Happy Days (1974–1984)
Comedy | Family | Music
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.5/10 X  

The Cunningham family live through the 1950s with help and guidance from the lovable and almost superhuman greaser, Fonzie.

Stars: Ron Howard, Henry Winkler, Marion Ross
Edit

Cast

Complete series cast summary:
...
 June Cleaver (235 episodes, 1957-1963)
...
 Theodore Cleaver (235 episodes, 1957-1963)
...
 Ward Cleaver (234 episodes, 1957-1963)
...
 Wally Cleaver (234 episodes, 1957-1963)
...
 Eddie Haskell (97 episodes, 1957-1963)
Edit

Storyline

The Cleavers are the 1950's 'All-American Family' in this 'feel-good' family sitcom. Parents Ward and June, and older brother Wally, try to keep Theodore ('the Beaver') out of trouble. However, Beaver continues to end up in one kind of jam or another. Unlike real life, these situations are always easily resolved to the satisfaction of all involved and the Beaver gets off with a few stern moralistic words of parental advice. Instigator and troublemaker Eddie Haskell is an older kid who always manages to avoid being caught. Written by Tad Dibbern <DIBBERN_D@a1.mscf.upenn.edu>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Comedy | Family

Certificate:

TV-G

Parents Guide:

 »
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

23 April 1957 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

It's a Small World  »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (234 episodes)

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

4:3
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

The address of the first house the Cleavers owned in Mayfield was 485 Mapleton Drive, a reference to first season network CBS's then New York headquarters at 485 Madison Avenue. The address of their second home was 211 Pine Street. See more »

Goofs

During season one, Wally was in 8th grade and Beaver was in 2nd - six years apart. By the end season six Beaver was finishing 8th grade and Wally was graduating high school - 4 years apart. See more »

Quotes

[Ward is sharing the story of Pandora's Box with the boys]
Ward Cleaver: According to Greek Mythology, she's responsible for all of Man's troubles.
Theodore "Beaver" Cleaver: She must be like Judy Hensler.
See more »

Connections

Featured in Shocker (1989) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more (Spoiler Alert!) »

User Reviews

 
A wonderful mix of nostalgia and relevance
2 February 2011 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

Leave it to Beaver has been somewhat maligned for representing an idealized, almost utopian view of the 1950's (although half the episodes aired in the next decade) where everyone is in his place... the sons go to the school dances and participate in sports and take the girls out on nice, proper dates (as well as always addressing their father as "sir"), the father goes to work and comes back to read the paper, and the wife is in, you guessed it, the kitchen. Among certain circles "June Cleaver" is seen as a dirty name.

If you watch the series, however, the show is much more than its reputation. Ward and June Cleaver are not the perfect parents, they are merely very good parents. It almost should be remembered that the world is seen through the eyes of Beaver Cleaver, the show's star. Keeping that in mind, it shouldn't be a surprise that we rarely see the parents argue (and also why we never learn what Ward's job actually is) and the world in general is seen as a pretty friendly place. The family system is very idealized and it's refreshing to watch. The show has a nostalgic vibe no matter what the age of the viewer (my father was a toddler when it aired and I can still feel nostalgic about it) because it does idealize values that are still cherished by people all over the world- decency, honesty, responsibility, family... the Cleavers are great with all these things just about every episode. It's also a very comfortable show... it isn't aiming for laughs that will put you on the floor laughing, but it will consistently get a chuckle out of people.

Because the Cleavers are idealized, some may see the show as "dated" because the 21st century has a more cynical approach to family. This is not to say that television that strives to show a realistic family situation is bad or wrong, only that showing an idealized version of the family isn't wrong either. What is often overlooked, however, is that many issues are addressed throughout the series run. Some things that may have been more acceptable in that era are frowned upon in LitB, and serious issues are dealt with throughout the series. Racism, alcoholism, divorce, and more that would surprise those who know the show only be reputation. Very often other children would talk about their father beating them (something Ward absolutely never did... not even spankings), and although these lines are often played for laughs there is a definite somber tone as well. And as a younger person watching the show, I see the same basic social issues being dealt with by Beaver and his brother Wally as kids and even adults deal with today. The things that Beaver or Wally do wrong every week (the show has one basic formula, but it works well) may seem small and petty in comparison to what many of us have done, but many of the same principles are involved in the reasons behind the wrong actions and the solutions. So in this way, Leave it to Beaver is both tremendously old-fashioned and relevant to any culture in which humans are involved.

As far as specifics about the cast, they're all iconic characters with the nasty, conniving Eddie Haskell being one of the greatest TV character ever. Ward's wisdom is always a nice treat, and I believe that June Cleaver has more depth and strength than she's given credit for (there are a few times when you wonder who wears the pants in the family!). One of the biggest drawbacks of the show is the older Beaver in the later seasons. He's still saying the same lines that are supposed to be cute and innocent, the problem is Mathers wasn't cute and innocent anymore, he was a teenager. That's partly why the show finally ended with the cast moving on to different things.

So all in all, it's a show that I can't recommend enough.


10 of 10 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Recent Posts
who is Chris Jeff? alisotom
LITB Opionion Girls are Rotten janet-conant
Football Banquet janet-conant
The most awkward episode in TV history... flackjacket
That time June intentionally poisoned Eddy Haskel... flackjacket
Okay Everyone It's Name It Time janet-conant
Discuss Leave It to Beaver (1957) on the IMDb message boards »

Contribute to This Page