The misadventures of a suburban boy, family and friends.
Reviews
Popularity
973 ( 54)

WAYS TO
WATCH:

See all

Episodes

Seasons


Years



6   5   4   3   2   1  
1963   1962   1961   1960   1959   1958   … See all »
Nominated for 2 Primetime Emmys. Another 3 wins & 2 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Learn more

People who liked this also liked... 

The Beverly Hillbillies (1962–1971)
Comedy | Family
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.2/10 X  

A nouveau riche hillbilly family moves to Beverly Hills and shakes up the privileged society with their hayseed ways.

Stars: Buddy Ebsen, Donna Douglas, Irene Ryan
The Andy Griffith Show (1960–1968)
Comedy | Family
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.3/10 X  

Widower Sheriff Andy and his son Opie live with Andy's Aunt Bee in Mayberry NC. With virtually no crimes to solve, most of Andy's time is spent philosophizing and calming down his cousin Deputy Barney.

Stars: Andy Griffith, Ron Howard, Don Knotts
Green Acres (1965–1971)
Comedy | Family
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.4/10 X  

A New York City attorney and his wife attempt to live as genteel farmers in the bizarre community of Hooterville.

Stars: Eddie Albert, Eva Gabor, Tom Lester
The Dick Van Dyke Show (1961–1966)
Comedy | Family
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.4/10 X  

The misadventures of a TV writer both at work and at home.

Stars: Dick Van Dyke, Mary Tyler Moore, Rose Marie
My Three Sons (1960–1972)
Comedy | Family
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.1/10 X  

Widower Steve Douglas raises three sons with the help of his father-in-law, and is later aided by the boys' great-uncle. An adopted son, a stepdaughter, wives, and another generation of sons join the loving family in later seasons.

Stars: Fred MacMurray, Stanley Livingston, Don Grady
The Brady Bunch (1969–1974)
Comedy | Family
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.7/10 X  

The misadventures of a large family united when two widowed people married.

Stars: Robert Reed, Florence Henderson, Ann B. Davis
Gilligan's Island (1964–1967)
Comedy | Family
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.4/10 X  

Seven men and women are stranded on an uncharted island following a torrential storm.

Stars: Bob Denver, Alan Hale Jr., Jim Backus
I Dream of Jeannie (1965–1970)
Comedy | Family | Fantasy
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.5/10 X  

A United States astronaut finds his life vastly complicated when he stumbles on to a bottle containing a female genie.

Stars: Barbara Eden, Larry Hagman, Bill Daily
Mister Ed (1958–1966)
Comedy | Family | Fantasy
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.2/10 X  

Mister Ed is a horse who is owned by Wilbur Post. Mister Ed is not just any horse, he talks to Wilbur! But this gets Wilbur in all kinds of trouble because Mister Ed won't talk to anyone ... See full summary »

Stars: Allan Lane, Alan Young, Connie Hines
I Love Lucy (1951–1957)
Comedy | Family
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.5/10 X  

A daffy woman constantly strives to become a star along with her bandleader husband and gets herself in the strangest situations.

Stars: Lucille Ball, Desi Arnaz, Vivian Vance
Laverne & Shirley (1976–1983)
Comedy | Family
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.9/10 X  

The misadventures of two single women in the 1950's and '60's.

Stars: Penny Marshall, Cindy Williams, David L. Lander
Bewitched (1964–1972)
Comedy | Family | Fantasy
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.7/10 X  

A witch married to an ordinary man cannot resist using her magic powers to solve the problems her family faces.

Stars: Elizabeth Montgomery, Dick York, Dick Sargent
Edit

Cast

Complete series cast summary:
...
 June Cleaver (235 episodes, 1957-1963)
...
 Theodore Cleaver (235 episodes, 1957-1963)
...
 Ward Cleaver (234 episodes, 1957-1963)
...
 Wally Cleaver (234 episodes, 1957-1963)
...
 Eddie Haskell (97 episodes, 1957-1963)
Edit

Storyline

The Cleavers are the 1950's 'All-American Family' in this 'feel-good' family sitcom. Parents Ward and June, and older brother Wally, try to keep Theodore ('the Beaver') out of trouble. However, Beaver continues to end up in one kind of jam or another. Unlike real life, these situations are always easily resolved to the satisfaction of all involved and the Beaver gets off with a few stern moralistic words of parental advice. Instigator and troublemaker Eddie Haskell is an older kid who always manages to avoid being caught. Written by Tad Dibbern <DIBBERN_D@a1.mscf.upenn.edu>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Comedy | Family

Certificate:

TV-G

Parents Guide:

 »
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

4 October 1957 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

It's a Small World  »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (234 episodes)

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

4:3
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Ward made at least four references to having attended high school in Shaker Heights, a town located between Mayfield and Cleveland, rendering yet another suggestion that Mayfield was most likely in Ohio. See more »

Quotes

[Beaver and Larry are having a picnic at Friends Lake]
Theodore "Beaver" Cleaver: Hey Larry, how come food tastes better when your eatin' it outside?
Larry Mondello: I don't know. Maybe 'cause if you drop something, nobody's gonna' holler at ya' for gettin' dirt dirty.
See more »

Connections

Referenced in NCIS: Dead Air (2010) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more (Spoiler Alert!) »

User Reviews

The "Facts of Life" of Family Sitcoms
21 November 2001 | by (Kissimmee, Florida) – See all my reviews

"Leave It to Beaver" (1957-1963) is a family show set in the suburban town of Mayfield that focuses on the Cleaver family: Ward (Hugh Beaumont), father and accountant; June (Barbara Billingsley), wife and stay-at-home Mom; and their two boys, Wally (Tony Dow) a teenager, and their youngest, Theodore, better known to everyone as "Beaver" (Jerry Mathers). While television of the 1950s and '60s had its share of family shows during its black and white age, including "Father Knows Best" with Robert Young and Jane Wyatt; "The Donna Reed Show" (with Donna Reed and Carl Betz); "Dennis the Menace" (starring Jay North); and later, the long running series, "My Three Sons" (1960-1972) with Fred MacMurray, it seemed unlikely that "Leave It to Beaver" would become the one sit-com to survive and continue to air on television, whether locally or on cable, decades after its concluding episode in 1963. The aforementioned family comedy shows had its share of reruns before slowly disappearing to Limbo, replaced by newer programs to its Color- oriented viewers, but this innocent black and white show which was done on film and not on video tape and to date never colorized to attract younger viewers, still entertains as is. "Leave It to Beaver" geared to its younger viewers when first aired, but today, the children who loved it back then are either adults or grandparents currently sharing their TV memories with their young ones. And the tradition continues.

Like most long-running shows, this one lasting six seasons, the earlier episodes are the best, mixing comedy, charm and well scripted dialog. It's obvious that the writer or writers who developed this program had fond memories of what it's like being a child, for that many of the show's characters, mainly children, could easily be identified by someone we at one time had know in our youth, one character in particular being Judy Henson, the school's pony tailed tattle-tale, teacher's pet and know-it-all. Beaver's closest friend during the first couple of seasons was the chubby Larry Mondello, while Wally's pals were Chester, Tooey and the conniving Eddie Haskell. Over the years, characters have come and gone, but the writers managed to find new friends for Beaver while they kept and expanded the Eddie Haskell character, played to perfection by Ken Osmond, one of the most memorable and "smooth" characters created and developed. Along the way, Chester and Tooey were just phased out, and a new character, Clarence "Lumpy" Rutherford (Frank Bank) stepped in. At first, Lumpy was the neighborhood bully who hounded Wally and the Beav, to eventually became one of Wally's closest friends.

With each passing season viewers got to see the show's new opening, watching the boys growing and maturing to young adults by season six. During the final season, the instrumental theme song remained the same, though jazzed for its final season (1962- 63). By then, Beaver, the central titled character has turned 14, losing his innocent and boyish charm and becoming least interesting character. With the writers sensing this, the scripts placed Beaver in support in several episodes while stories revolved around more on Wally and his friends. There were even segments in which either Lumpy or Eddie would have almost an entire episode, but when Beaver became the central character, it lacked something, becoming mediocre episodes. By mid season, Beaver would start becoming more interested in girls. After 235 episodes, the Cleaver family went into retirement.

The amazing aspect about this program is the development of its characters, not only the central ones but the supporting crew. Aside from Ken Osmond's ever so polite Eddie, who's well mannered in front of the adults and a "big mouth, wise guy" to his pals, there's Richard Deacon as Fred Rutherford, Lumpy's father; the charming Sue Randall as Miss Landers, Beaver's teacher; Burt Mustin as Gus, the fireman; Beaver's other friends including Stanley Fafara as Whitey Whitney, who appeared occasionally through the show's six seasons; Stephen Talbot as Gilbert, and Richard Correll as Richard Rickover. The show might have its share of contradiction, there was a Violet Rutherford, Fred's daughter/ Lumpy's sister, who disappeared, leaving Lumpy the Rutherfordf's only "offspring," while Gilbert Bates introduced as the only child of his widowed father, to suddenly have a mother and sister in later episodes who never appear.

Aside this being a comedy show, "Leave It to Beaver" does take time out for some tender moments. In almost every episode, after either Wally or the Beav, or both, get tangled up with problems, whether it be their fault or not, there is usually a good father to son(s) lecture, along with the moral lesson to what's occurred. One in particular line recited by Ward (Hugh Beaumont) to his wife, June, that stands out is, "The way to get your children's love is to first earn their respect." Occasionally mother June would have her moment of truth with her boys as well, giving them the lesson, value and facts of life, something currently missing in today's TV family sitcoms. And even when the parents are in the wrong, this is one of those rare cases in which the TV Dad or Mom will come out and admit it, showing its viewers that even the parents aren't perfect, but they do what's best for their children as well as learning from their own mistakes.

There are many classic episodes, the one hailed the best where Beaver gets trapped in a billboard soup bowl. Regardless of its age, "Leave It to Beaver" is harmless fun, good family viewing. There was even a 1983 reunion show, "Still the Beaver," along with a new up-to-date series, "The New Leave It to Beaver" (1985-1989). While it's good seeing those familiar faces again, a little older and slightly wiser, but minus the deceased Hugh Beaumont, who is sorely missed, nothing comes close to this original series.


34 of 37 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Recent Posts
What state was Mayfield in ? Chris398
Gee, did people in the 50's really talk like this and junk? flackjacket
Most "edgy" episodes michaelmartind
Which episodes mentioned God michaelmartind
Abe Lincoln janet-conant
Wally and the Fraternity michaelmartind
Discuss Leave It to Beaver (1957) on the IMDb message boards »

Contribute to This Page