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2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2007

1-20 of 23 items from 2013   « Prev | Next »


Long Before Indie Blockbuster Billy Jack, Laughlin Had Trouble on the Set of Altman's First Feature Film

18 December 2013 4:10 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Tom Laughlin: ‘Billy Jack’ actor-filmmaker who died last week helped to revolutionize film distribution patterns in North America (photo: Tom Laughlin in ‘Billy Jack’) Tom Laughlin, best known for the Billy Jack movies he wrote, directed, and starred in opposite his wife Delores Taylor (since 1954), died of complications from pneumonia last Thursday, December 12, 2013, at Los Robles Hospital and Medical Center in Thousand Oaks, northwest of Los Angeles County. Tom Laughlin (born on August 10, 1931, in Minneapolis) was 82; in the last dozen years or so, he suffered from a number of ailments, including cancer and a series of strokes. Tom Laughlin movies: ‘The Delinquents’ and fighting with Robert Altman In the mid-’50s, after acting in college plays and in his own stock company while attending university in Wisconsin, Tom Laughlin began landing small roles on television, e.g., Climax!, Navy Log, The Millionaire. At that time, he was also cast »

- Andre Soares

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Joan Fontaine obituary

16 December 2013 9:16 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Oscar-winning actor who played threatened heroines for Alfred Hitchcock in Rebecca and Suspicion

It was hard to cast the lead in Daphne du Maurier's Rebecca, filmed by Alfred Hitchcock in 1939. The female fans of the bestseller were very protective of the naive woman whom the widower Max de Winter marries and transports to his ancestral home of Manderley. None of the contenders – including Vivien Leigh, Anne Baxter and Loretta Young – felt right for the second Mrs de Winter, who was every lending-library reader's dream self.

To play opposite Laurence Olivier in the film, the producer David O Selznick suggested instead a 21-year-old actor with whom he was smitten: Joan Fontaine. The prolonged casting process made Fontaine anxious. Vulnerability was central to the part, and you can see that vulnerability, that inability to trust her own judgment, in every frame of the film. The performance brought Fontaine, who has died »

- Veronica Horwell

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"Billy Jack" Star Tom Laughlin Dead At 82

16 December 2013 7:35 AM, PST | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

By Lee Pfeiffer 

Maverick actor and filmmaker Tom Laughlin has died at the age of 82 after a long illness. Laughlin was just another hunky actor in small roles in films like South Pacific and Tea and Sympathy. However, in 1967 he successfully rode the wave of popularity attached to biker flicks by writing, directing and starring in The Born Losers. (He used the named T.C Frank for his non-acting credits). The film starred Laughlin as a half-Native American named Billy Jack who takes on seemingly insurmountable odds to help oppressed people. The film was a hit and Laughlin revived the character in 1971 in the film Billy Jack. However, he was angry with Warner Brothers' lukewarm marketing of the film. He engaged in a high profile battle to win back distribution rights and finally prevailed in court. In 1974 Laughlin took the bold step of investing millions of dollars in re-marketing a »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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Joan Fontaine: Iconic Actress Dies At 96

16 December 2013 4:32 AM, PST | HollywoodLife | See recent HollywoodLife news »

So sad. The legendary actress who won an Oscar for Alfred Hitchcock’s ‘Suspicion’ in 1941 passed away on Dec. 15 of natural causes. She was 96 years old.

Joan Fontaine, the cool, beautiful actress who lit up the 1940s and 50s, died from natural causes in her home in Carmel, Calif. at the age of 96 years old on Dec. 15.

Joan Fontaine: Actress Dies At 96

The Oscar-winning actress passed away in her sleep, longtime friend Noel Beutel told the Associated Press. Noel said that Joan had been fading for the last few days, but that she died peacefully.

With her soft beauty and aptitude for playing frightened damsels in distress, Joan was one of the most recognizable actresses of her time. She won an Academy Award in 1941 for starring in the Alfred Hitchcock film, Suspicion. She was also nominated for best actress for Hitchcock’s Rebecca in 1940 and for The Constant Nymph three years later. »

- Andrew Gruttadaro

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Tom Laughlin Dies at 82: Actor Became a Maverick Icon

15 December 2013 6:06 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Tom Laughlin, who died of complications from pneumonia Dec. 12 in Thousand Oaks at age 82, was one of those only-in-Hollywood stories. After acting in small parts on films and TV shows in the 1950s and 1960s, he turned filmmaker with a series of “Billy Jack” films, whose anti-establishment attitude captured the zeitgeist of the 1970s.

The fourth film in the series, the 1977 “Billy Jack Goes to Washington,” floundered at the box office, but Laughlin’s life imitated his art, as he became a political and social advocate, running for president three times. He also founded a Montessori school and became a political activist.

Laughlin was a true Hollywood maverick, tackling topics in his 1970s films that reflected the disenfranchised Americans who embraced his films. But he also battled the studios’ distribution and marketing systems. Following the leads of such diverse influences as John Cassavetes and Roger Corman, Laughlin embraced the American indie movement, »

- Tim Gray

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Joan Fontaine, Oscar-Winning Star of Hitchcock Classics, Dies at 96

15 December 2013 4:50 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Cool beauty Joan Fontaine, who gave strong performances in a number of classic films including Alfred Hitchcock’s “Rebecca” and Max Ophuls’ “Letter From an Unknown Woman,” died Sunday at her home in Carmel, Calif. She was 96.

Though acclaimed for her talent and elegance, the actress was equally well known for her decades-long feud with sister Olivia de Havilland.

Her porcelain beauty sometimes underlined an icy hauteur (which became more pronounced in later years), but she is best remembered for performances of vulnerability, such as in “The Constant Nymph” (her personal favorite) and Hitchcock’s “Suspicion,” which brought her an Oscar.

The daughter of Lillian Ruse and Walter de Havilland, Fontaine was born in Tokyo (she was 18 months younger than Olivia). Her parents divorced soon after, and her mother brought the two young girls to live in Saratoga, in Northern California, where she taught diction and voice control.

Her mother »

- Richard Natale

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Blue Is The Warmest Color – The Review

7 November 2013 4:09 PM, PST | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Several films set in those teenage high school years deal with the main character’s sexual awakening, be it The Summer Of 42 or Tea And Sympathy, This film festival winner goes further (very far) in dealing with that awakening and a revelation for the protagonist. Blue Is The Warmest Color is adapted from a celebrated graphic novel from Julie Maroh by screenwriter Ghalia Lacroix and director Abdellatif Kechichi. Besides reaping awards it has been generating a lot of controversy for its no-holds barred, shot in real-time love scenes (and also for its 3 hour running time). Time to set aside the press and the hype and see how it works at telling this very adult story.

Blue is mainly the journey of Adele (Adele Exarchopoulos), a smart, sassy seventeen year-old attending high school in France. She gets along with her mother and father, enjoys school (particularly French literature) and has many friends. »

- Jim Batts

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Oscar Nominee, Emmy Winner, Record-Holding Tony Winner Harris Dead

24 August 2013 11:03 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Julie Harris: Best Actress Oscar nominee, multiple Tony winner dead at 87 (photo: James Dean and Julie Harris in ‘East of Eden’) Film, stage, and television actress Julie Harris, a Best Actress Academy Award nominee for the psychological drama The Member of the Wedding and James Dean’s leading lady in East of Eden, died of congestive heart failure at her home in West Chatham, Massachusetts, on August 24, 2013. Harris, born in Grosse Pointe Park, Michigan, on December 2, 1925, was 87. Throughout her career, Julie Harris collected ten Tony Award nominations, more than any other performer. She won five times — a record matched only by that of Angela Lansbury. Harris’ Tony Award wins were for I Am a Camera (1952), The Lark (1956), Forty Carats (1969), The Last of Mrs. Lincoln (1973), and The Belle of Amherst (1977). Harris’ tenth and final Tony nomination was for The Gin Game (1997). In 2002, she was honored with a Special Lifetime Achievement Tony Award. »

- Andre Soares

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Holden Has Two 'Wild' Movies Tonight

21 August 2013 6:56 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

William Holden movies: ‘The Bridge on the River KwaiWilliam Holden is Turner Classic Movies’ "Summer Under the Stars" featured actor today, August 21, 2013. Throughout the day, TCM has been showing several William Holden movies made at Columbia, though his work at Paramount (e.g., I Wanted Wings, Dear Ruth, Streets of Laredo, Dear Wife) remains mostly off-limits. Right now, TCM is presenting David Lean’s 1957 Best Picture Academy Award winner and all-around blockbuster The Bridge on the River Kwai, the Anglo-American production that turned Lean into filmdom’s brainier Cecil B. DeMille. Until then a director of mostly small-scale dramas, Lean (quite literally) widened the scope of his movies with the widescreen-formatted Southeast Asian-set World War II drama, which clocks in at 161 minutes. Even though William Holden was The Bridge on the River Kwai‘s big box-office draw, the film actually belongs to Alec Guinness’ Pow British commander and to »

- Andre Soares

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TV Actor Laurence Haddon Dead at 90

21 May 2013 2:13 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Laurence Haddon, who appeared onstage and in TV shows including “Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman,” died in May 10, in Santa Monica from complications associated with Lewy Body Disease. He was 90.

Born in Philadelphia, he attended Syracuse U. After Pearl Harbor he left college to train on the Pennsylvania School Ship and then served in the merchant marine during WWII. After the war he did a brief stint in the aluminum business until he decided to become an actor. In New York, he landed numerous parts onstage and in the early era of live TV, and toured with “Tea and Sympathy” and The Warm Peninsula.”

In 1958 he married actress and model Jacqueline Prevost. He continued his career in film and TV in Los Angeles, with feature credits including “The Graduate” and “Fantastic Voyage.”

Haddon had recurring roles on “Dennis the Menace,” “Dallas” (as J.R. ‘s banker), “Knots Landing,” “General Hospital” and most notably, »

- Pat Saperstein

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TV Actor Laurence Haddon Dead at 90

21 May 2013 2:13 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Laurence Haddon, who appeared onstage and in TV shows including “Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman,” died in May 10, in Santa Monica from complications associated with Lewy Body Disease. He was 90.

Born in Philadelphia, he attended Syracuse U. After Pearl Harbor he left college to train on the Pennsylvania School Ship and then served in the merchant marine during WWII. After the war he did a brief stint in the aluminum business until he decided to become an actor. In New York, he landed numerous parts onstage and in the early era of live TV, and toured with “Tea and Sympathy” and The Warm Peninsula.”

In 1958 he married actress and model Jacqueline Prevost. He continued his career in film and TV in Los Angeles, with feature credits including “The Graduate” and “Fantastic Voyage.”

Haddon had recurring roles on “Dennis the Menace,” “Dallas” (as J.R. ‘s banker), “Knots Landing,” “General Hospital” and most notably, »

- Pat Saperstein

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Aubrey Woods obituary

14 May 2013 12:51 PM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Graceful stage actor who stood out in Doctor Who on TV and the film Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory

In a long and distinguished career, the actor Aubrey Woods, who has died aged 85, covered the waterfront, from West End revues and musicals to TV series and films, most notably, perhaps, singing The Candy Man in Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory (1971), starring Gene Wilder, and playing the Controller in the Day of the Daleks storyline in Doctor Who (1972).

Tall and well-favoured in grace and authority on the stage, he played Fagin in the musical Oliver! for three years, succeeding Ron Moody in the original 1960 production. He was equally in demand on BBC radio, writing and appearing in many plays, including his own adaptations of the Mapp and Lucia novels by Ef Benson (he was a vice-president of the Ef Benson society).

In the early part of his career he »

- Michael Coveney

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Aubrey Woods obituary

14 May 2013 12:51 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Graceful stage actor who stood out in Doctor Who on TV and the film Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory

In a long and distinguished career, the actor Aubrey Woods, who has died aged 85, covered the waterfront, from West End revues and musicals to TV series and films, most notably, perhaps, singing The Candy Man in Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory (1971), starring Gene Wilder, and playing the Controller in the Day of the Daleks storyline in Doctor Who (1972).

Tall and well-favoured in grace and authority on the stage, he played Fagin in the musical Oliver! for three years, succeeding Ron Moody in the original 1960 production. He was equally in demand on BBC radio, writing and appearing in many plays, including his own adaptations of the Mapp and Lucia novels by Ef Benson (he was a vice-president of the Ef Benson society).

In the early part of his career he »

- Michael Coveney

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Actor John Kerr Dead At 81; "Tea And Sympathy" And "The Pit And The Pendulum" Among His Credits

13 February 2013 1:39 PM, PST | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

Actor John Kerr died Saturday. He was 81 years old. Kerr's big screen career was somewhat limited but he did have strong roles in South Pacific and Tea and Sympathy, playing a young man suspected of being a homosexual. (Kerr won a Tony for his performance in the Broadway stage production). Kerr also appeared as the hero in Roger Corman's 1961 adaptation of Edgar Allan Poe's The Pit and the Pendulum. Kerr worked extensively in television while simultaneously pursuing a law degree. He eventually went into semi-retirement from acting in order to concentrate on his law career. For more click here

For writer Tom Weaver's interview with John Kerr, in which he discusses making the Corman production, click here »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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'South Pacific' actor John Kerr dies, aged 81

13 February 2013 11:57 AM, PST | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

John Kerr has died, aged 81.

The American actor was best known on screen for his role as Lieutenant Joseph Cable in the 1958 musical film South Pacific.

He was also known for his part in the 1953 Broadway production of Robert Anderson's Tea and Sympathy, which earned him a Tony Award.

His TV roles included Peyton Place from 1965-66, and The Streets of San Francisco throughout the 1970s.

His son Michael confirmed that he died of heart failure on Saturday (February 9) at Huntington Hospital in Pasadena.

Kerr won plaudits for his turn as a struggling school boy who was bullied over his suspected homosexuality in the Broadway run of Tea and Sympathy.

He reprised the role in the 1956 film version opposite Deborah Kerr (no relation), who also starred in the Broadway production.

Kerr later featured in Roger Corman's The Pit and the Pendulum, based on the original stories of Edgar Allan Poe. »

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R.I.P. John Kerr of Tea And Sympathy and South Pacific

12 February 2013 1:36 PM, PST | avclub.com | See recent The AV Club news »

Actor John Kerr has died, at the age of 81. Born into a theatrical family—both his parents, Geoffrey Kerr and June Walker, as well as his paternal grandfather, Frederick Kerr, appeared on Broadway and in films—Kerr made his Broadway debut in Bernadine when he was 21. The next year, he had perhaps the greatest success of his career when he co-starred with Deborah Kerr (no relation) in the original Broadway production of Robert Anderson’s Tea And Sympathy, the “troubled young man/older woman” romance that gave the world the much-imitated (and much-parodied) line, “Years from now, when »

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"South Pacific" Actor Dies At Age 81

12 February 2013 1:34 PM, PST | Huffington Post | See recent Huffington Post news »

Pasadena, Calif. — John Kerr, the stage and film actor whose credits include the movie "South Pacific," the thriller "The Pit and the Pendulum" and a Tony Award-winning turn in "Tea and Sympathy," has died. He was 81.

Kerr died Saturday of heart failure at Huntington Hospital in Pasadena, his son Michael said.

He was perhaps best known for playing a sensitive prep school student who is bullied for being a suspected homosexual in Elia Kazan's 1953 Broadway production of "Tea and Sympathy." He went on to reprise the role in a 1956 film version.

The Harvard-educated Kerr also played a district attorney on TV in "Peyton Place" in the mid-1960s. After leaving show business, he became a lawyer specializing in personal injury law. »

- AP

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R.I.P. John Kerr

12 February 2013 11:57 AM, PST | Deadline TV | See recent Deadline TV news »

TV, film and stage actor John Kerr, remembered for his roles in South Pacific and Tea And Sympathy, has died. His son tells the AP Kerr died Saturday of heart failure in a Pasadena, CA hospital. He was 81. Kerr played the role of Lieutenant Joe Cable in the 1958 movie musical South Pacific, but was perhaps best known for his Tony Award-winning performance as Tom Robinson Lee, a sensitive student suspected of being a homosexual in the 1953 Broadway production of Tea And Sympathy. He later reprised the character for the film version in 1956. His other film credits include The Crowded Sky (1960) and Roger Corman’s The Pit And The Pendulum (1961). Kerr’s first TV acting role was in 1954 on NBC’s Justice and he also played a district attorney in Peyton Place in the mid-1960s. He went on to graduate from UCLA Law School and practiced law full time, accepting »

- THE DEADLINE TEAM

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John Kerr obituary

11 February 2013 4:05 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Actor who starred as the troubled pupil in Tea and Sympathy on stage and screen

The actor John Kerr, who has died aged 81, won a Tony award in his first starring role on the Broadway stage, as Tom in Tea and Sympathy in 1953, and subsequently appeared in the 1956 film version directed by Vincente Minnelli. Robert Anderson's play, in which a schoolboy "confesses" to his housemaster's wife that he might be homosexual – only to be seduced out of the notion by the sympathetic listener – was considered so controversial that it was restricted to a "members only" theatrical run in London, and Minnelli's film received an X certificate, despite modification, notably in the suggestion that the housemaster was gay.

Kerr starred as the boy, although by then he was in his 20s. Born in New York, son of the actors Geoffrey Kerr and June Walker, he had already graduated from Harvard, »

- Brian Baxter

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Kerr's Biggest Box-Office Hit: Musical About Romance and Racism During WWII

9 February 2013 3:23 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Kerr in the 1958 box-office blockbuster musical South Pacific (seen above with love interest France Nuyen) and his (few) other post-Tea and Sympathy efforts [Please check out the previous article: "The Two Kerrs in the stage and film versions of Tea and Sympathy."] Director Curtis Bernhardt's Gaby (1956) was a generally disliked remake of Waterloo Bridge, with Kerr and leading lady Leslie Caron in the old Robert Taylor and Vivien Leigh roles (1940 movie version -- and even older Douglass Montgomery and Mae Clarke roles in the 1931 film version). Jeffrey Hayden's The Vintage (1957), starring Kerr and Mel Ferrer absurdly cast as Italian brothers, also failed to generate much box-office or critical interest. MGM leading lady Pier Angeli played Ferrer's love interest in the film, while the more mature and married French star Michèle Morgan (a plot element similar to that found in Tea and Sympathy) is Kerr's object of desire. (Pictured above: South Pacific cast members John Kerr and France Nuyen embracing.) Also in the mid-'50s, John Kerr »

- Andre Soares

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2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2007

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