Somebody Up There Likes Me (1956) - News Poster

News

Witness the Evolution of Cinematography with Compilation of Oscar Winners

This past weekend, the American Society of Cinematographers awarded Greig Fraser for his contribution to Lion as last year’s greatest accomplishment in the field. Of course, his achievement was just a small sampling of the fantastic work from directors of photography, but it did give us a stronger hint at what may be the winner on Oscar night. Ahead of the ceremony, we have a new video compilation that honors all the past winners in the category at the Academy Awards

Created by Burger Fiction, it spans the stunning silent landmark Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans all the way up to the end of Emmanuel Lubezki‘s three-peat win for The Revenant. Aside from the advancements in color and aspect ration, it’s a thrill to see some of cinema’s most iconic shots side-by-side. However, the best way to experience the evolution of the craft is by
See full article at The Film Stage »

The Best Of The Best: The Greatest Movie Actors and the roles that made them great

  • HeyUGuys
Author: Dave Roper

The prospective candidates for admission to MiB were hand-picked because they were the best of the best of the best. That’s a lot of superlatives. Eric Roberts and Chris Penn were two of the more unlikely members of a Tae Kwon Do team that took on Korea in The Best of the Best and across pretty much every athletic and artistic theatre of endeavour you can think of, debate rages as to who is the best of the best. Today we look at the greatest movie actors.

This new series of articles is not intended to lay such arguments to rest. Instead it will hopefully prompt some discussion and (polite) debate as we consider, within certain film-making disciplines, who might be considered to be the best and what is their best work. Highly subjective, of course, but that is whence springs healthy debate. We’ll get to actresses,
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Bleed For This: Miles Teller's boxing movie is no knockout

Despite some heavyweight performances, this pugilist biopic is overshadowed by some very distinguished forebears

Related: Bleed for This review – Miles Teller boxing biopic is flattened by cliche

Another weekend, another boxing biopic, another young star looking to make a name for himself. Stepping into the ring has been a rite of passage for talented, mostly method-friendly young actors for six decades or so now, starting with (non-method) Errol Flynn as “Gentleman Jim” Corbett in 1942 and Paul Newman as Rocky Graziano in Robert Wise’s Somebody Up There Likes Me (a role inherited from James Dean) in 1956. The most influential, of course, were Sylvester Stallone’s Rocky (not a biopic, but no matter) and Robert De Niro’s Jake Lamotta in Raging Bull, but in recent years all manner of pretenders have taken a shot at the crown.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Hands Of Stone – Review

As the Summer starts to fade, the multiplex looks again to sports films, those (like the “sport” of movie viewing) which are set indoors, away from the harsh cold winds. We’re not talking hockey or basketball, but rather the “mano y mano” battle that seems almost tailor-made for movies, boxing. Of course, there are many times when the boxing flick has been mixed with other genres. Just last year we had a boxing/ family tear-jerker with Southpaw and a boxing/ fantasy/ franchise-reboot Creed (it squeezed a few tears from audiences, too). This time out (perhaps to be an early Oscar contender), we’re seeing a pugilistic biography, a mix that goes back to the dawn of cinema. The 1940’s had Gentleman Jim, and the 50’s had Paul Newman as Rocky Marciano in Somebody Up There Likes Me. The greatest true-life boxing biopic may be 1980’s Raging Bull with an Oscar-winning turn by Robert DeNiro.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Oscar predictions: 'The Revenant' cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki will win record third in a row

Oscar predictions: 'The Revenant' cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki will win record third in a row
The American Society of Cinematographers awarded Emmanuel Lubezki his third consecutive win for “The Revenant.” Should he repeat at the Oscars, he’ll be the first person in history to win Best Cinematography three years in a row, and will be one away from tying Leon Shamroy and Joseph Ruttenberg for the most overall wins in this category. Shamroy prevailed for “The Black Swan” [1942], “Wilson” [1944], “Leave Her to Heaven” [1945], and “Cleopatra” [1963]. And Ruttenberg was crowned champ for “The Great Waltz” [1938], “Mrs. Miniver” [1942], “Somebody Up There Likes Me” [1956], and “Gigi” [1958]. -Break- Subscribe to Gold Derby Breaking News Alerts & Experts’ Latest Oscar Predictions Lubezki competes at the Oscars against Ed Lachman (“Carol”), three-time Oscar champ Robert Richardson (“The Hateful Eight&r...
See full article at Gold Derby »

11 Days Until Oscar! Trivia Party

I'm beginning to have butterflies. You? Just for fun some random trivia surrounding the number 11 today. Links go to previous articles here at Tfe on these films or performers

• Pictures with exactly 11 Oscar nominations

Mr Smith Goes to Washington (1939), Rebecca (1940), Sergeant York (1941), The Pride of the Yankees (1942), Sunset Blvd (1950), West Side Story (1961), Judgment at Nuremberg (1961), Oliver! (1968), The Godfather Pt II (1974), Chinatown (1974), The Turning Point (1977), Gandhi (1982), Terms of Endearment (1983), Amadeus (1984), A Passage to India (1984), Out of Africa (1985), The Color Purple (1985), Saving Private Ryan (1998), Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003), The Aviator (2004), Hugo (2011), and Life of Pi (2012)

• Movies that won exactly 11 Oscars

That's the most any movie has ever won and it's a three way tie: Ben-Hur (1959), Titanic (1997), The Lord of the Ring: Return of the King (2003). Currently Ben-Hur is being remade and is supposedly opening this very summer... wish them good luck because living up to such a
See full article at FilmExperience »

James Dean: 11 Things You (Probably) Didn't Know About the 'Rebel' Icon

For a guy who starred in only three movies, James Dean has had an oversized impact on pop culture.

Eighty-five years after his birth (on February 8, 1931) and 60 years after the release of his final film ("Giant"), Dean is still our top poster boy for teen angst. And it didn't hurt his legend that his death in a car crash at age 24 meant we never had to watch him grow old, lose his looks, sell out, or make a bad film.

As iconic and familiar as Dean has remained for six decades, there's still plenty of mystery behind this lost-too-soon idol. In honor of his 85th, here are 10 things you need to know about the "Rebel Without a Cause" star.

1. Though he typically played the brooding outsider, Dean was a jock and a team player as a teen. He excelled at baseball, basketball, and pole vaulting in high school and took up fencing in college.
See full article at Moviefone »

Sammo Hung: The Man, The Legend

Sammo Hung is regarded as one of the greatest Kung Fu performers of his generation. His high tempo, hard htting fight sequences have captured audiences all over the world. Future generations will look back and watch in amazement, witnessing one of the very best in world cinema.

Peking Opera Days

The Peking Opera school was run from a small theatre by Master Yu Jim Yuen, this was where Sammo Hung would begin his journey. In them days, the stundents would normally enroll for around 10 years, each day performing gruelling tasks for up to 18 hours a day which included training in the Martial Arts, weapons training, acrobatics, acting and singing. The Peking opera of course brought together Sammo Hung, Jackie Chan, Yuen Biao, Yuen Wah, Corey Yuen, Yuen Tak and Yuen Mo, who would eventually be known as the 7 Little Fortunes. They took the first name “Yuen” in a sign of
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

Robert Loggia (1930-2015) ...and 80s Oscar Movies.

Tough guy Italian American actor Robert Loggia, arguably best known for supporting roles in gangster classics, has passed away at age 85. He had been suffering from Alzheimers. Condolences to his family and his fans.

The enduring character actor's career began on the Broadway stage in the 1950s but he quickly began mixing it up on television where he starred in a few short lived TV shows and made numerous guest appearances over the past five decades (!). His first big screen role (uncredited) was as "Frankie Peppo" in the Paul Newman classic Somebody Up There Likes Me but his film career didn't hit its peak until the 1980s with a string of hits including An Officer and a Gentleman, Scarface, Prizzi's Honor, and the comedy Big with Tom Hanks.

Though the earliest Oscar ceremony memory I have is Shirley Maclaine winning (1983), the first Oscar race I actively followed was in 1985, the
See full article at FilmExperience »

Evolution of a Champ: The Rocky Film Saga

On March 24th, 1975, struggling actor Sylvester Stallone spent his last few dollars to see boxing champ Muhammad Ali fight Chuck Wepner. Thought to be an easy win, Ali surprisingly met his match: a career brawler who was having the fight of his life. Fifteen rounds and an Ali knockdown later, Wepner lost. But the scrappy no name fighter inspired Stallone, who emerged from a twenty-hour writing binge with a screenplay and an underdog character named Rocky Balboa.

The script quickly became a hot property in Hollywood, and several attempts were made to purchase it for stars like Burt Reynolds and Ryan O’Neal. But Stallone refused, knowing full well that no one could play the part like he could. Stallone eventually got his wish at United Artists, and under director John G. Avildsen, the rest became movie history. Released in 1976, Rocky was a global sensation, winning a Best Picture Oscar
See full article at CinemaNerdz »

Academy Award Film Series: It Takes Eastwood to Get Enthusiastic Praise for Derivative, Mostly Predictable Father Figure Melo

'Million Dollar Baby' movie with Hilary Swank and Clint Eastwood. 'Million Dollar Baby' movie: Clint Eastwood contrived, overlong drama made (barely) watchable by first-rate central performance Fresh off the enthusiastically received – and insincere – Mystic River, Clint Eastwood went on to tackle the ups and downs of the boxing world in the 2004 melo Million Dollar Baby. Despite the cheery title, this is not the usual Rocky-esque rags-to-riches story of the determined underdog who inevitably becomes a super-topdog once she (in this case it's a “she”) puts on her gloves, jumps into the boxing ring, and starts using other women as punching bags. That's because about two-thirds into the film, Million Dollar Baby takes a radical turn toward tragedy that is as unexpected as everything else on screen is painfully predictable. In fact, once the dust is settled, even that last third quickly derails into the same sentimental mush Eastwood and
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Popular Disney Actor and Broadway Performer Jones Dead at 84

Dean Jones: Actor in Disney movies. Dean Jones dead at 84: Actor in Disney movies 'The Love Bug,' 'That Darn Cat!' Dean Jones, best known for playing befuddled heroes in 1960s Walt Disney movies such as That Darn Cat! and The Love Bug, died of complications from Parkinson's disease on Tue., Sept. 1, '15, in Los Angeles. Jones (born on Jan. 25, 1931, in Decatur, Alabama) was 84. Dean Jones movies Dean Jones began his Hollywood career in the mid-'50s, when he was featured in bit parts – at times uncredited – in a handful of films at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer In 2009 interview for Christianity Today, Jones recalled playing his first scene (in These Wilder Years) with veteran James Cagney, who told him “Walk to your mark and remember your lines” – supposedly a lesson he would take to heart. At MGM, bit player Jones would also be featured in Robert Wise's
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Dean Jones, Star of The Love Bug, Dies at Age 84

Dean Jones, Star of The Love Bug, Dies at Age 84
Dean Jones, who starred in multiple Disney movies and was perhaps best known for playing race-car driver Jim in 1968’s The Love Bug, died on Tuesday, Sept. 1, in Los Angeles at age 84. According to The Hollywood Reporter, his publicist, Richard Hoffman, said the actor passed away due to complications from Parkinson’s disease. Jones made his acting debut as an uncredited soldier in 1956’s Somebody Up There Likes Me, which starred Paul Newman, and moved on to other television and film roles. But it was with [...]
See full article at Us Weekly »

Dean Jones, ‘The Love Bug’ Star, Dies at 84

Dean Jones, ‘The Love Bug’ Star, Dies at 84
Actor Dean Jones, best known for his acting work in such Disney films as “The Love Bug” and “That Darn Cat,” died of Parkinson’s disease Tuesday in Los Angeles. He was 84.

In addition to his appearances in films like “Under the Yum-Yum Tree,” “The Shaggy D.A.,” “The Million Dollar Duck,” “Snowball Express,” “Herbie Goes to Monte Carlo” and “Beethoven,” Jones also had roles in five Broadway shows and appeared in numerous television series and specials. Overall, he appeared in 46 films over the course of his career.

Jones was born in Decatur, Ala., and served in the Navy during the Korean War. He attended Asbury University in Kentucky, which awarded him with an honorary degree in 2002.

The actor made his Broadway debut with “There Was A Little Girl” with Jane Fonda in 1960, and would go on to star in Broadway’s “Under the Yum-Yum Tree” that same year, before starring
See full article at Variety - Film News »

'Birdman' cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki joins exclusive club with Oscar win

  • Hitfix
'Birdman' cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki joins exclusive club with Oscar win
By winning the Best Cinematography Oscar for a second year in a row, "Birdman" director of photography Emmanuel Lubezki has joined a truly elite club whose ranks haven't been breached in nearly two decades. Only four other cinematographers have won the prize in two consecutive years. The last time it happened was in 1994 and 1995, when John Toll won for Edward Zwick's "Legends of the Fall" and Mel Gibson's "Braveheart" respectively. Before that you have to go all the way back to the late '40s, when Winton Hoch won in 1948 (Victor Fleming's "Joan of Arc" with Ingrid Bergman) and 1949 (John Ford's western "She Wore a Yellow Ribbon"). Both victories came in the color category, as the Academy awarded prizes separately for black-and-white and color photography from 1939 to 1956. Leon Shamroy also won back-to-back color cinematography Oscars, for Henry King's 1944 Woodrow Wilson biopic "Wilson" and John M. Stahl
See full article at Hitfix »

September's Gone, Girl

What a busy busy month that was. We were overachievers here, really. I'm so exhausted I'm hoping to prick my finger on a cursed spindle for a little R&R. Traffic always picks up in the fall when the adult movies arrive so if you're just rejoining us we welcome you back with slighly chilled affection (this place is hopping all year round!) by pointing out what you may have missed.

Neo, Cheryl and Rocky hike the Pct

Index of Goodies 

Toronto was a blast! - a handydandy guide (and prizes) for everything I saw there

Nyff - in progress but we've already talked about a bunch of foreign films as well as Maps to the Stars, Gone Girl & Whiplash

Best Shot S5 -highlights from Under the Skin, Eternal Sunshine, The Matrix, etc...

Robert Wise Centennial - the team had fun looking back at this versatile Oscar winner's filmography with 5 randomly selected offerings: Audrey Rose,
See full article at FilmExperience »

Robert Wise Centenary: Somebody Up There Likes Me (1956)

For Robert Wise's centennial, we're looking back on a random selection of his films beyond the familiar mega-hits (The Sound of Music & West Side Story) which we are far more prone to talk about. Here's Nathaniel on the Paul Newman boxing drama...

The poster art for Robert Wise's 1956 biopic on Rocky Graziano reminds us that the more things change the more they stay the same. We're still getting taglines like "A girl can lift a fella to the skies!" (see: Theory of Everything) but Pier Angeli's role as Rocky's wife Norma in the Paul Newman boxing pic is actually fairly minor. She straightens him out primarily by giving him something consistent to hold on to in a life that's been previously totally adrift in noncommittal boxing matches for money and petty crimes. Not that his crimes were always petty, mind you, but we'll get to that in a minute.
See full article at FilmExperience »

The 101 Best Sports Movies of All Time

A quarter-century ago, Kevin Costner hit a double-play, following up "Bull Durham" with "Field of Dreams" and becoming king of the sports movie. Twenty-five years later, as "Field of Dreams" marks its 25th anniversary (it was released on April 21, 1989), Costner is back with "Draft Day." The movie's about football, not baseball, and Costner's character plays in the executive suite, not on the field, but his mere presence still offers a reminder of great sports movies past.

And after all, isn't nostalgia a key element of sports movies? "Field of Dreams" makes this explicit -- we long for the sports heroes of our childhood, for a supposed long-gone golden age of our preferred sport, as a way of connecting with our past and bridging the generational divide that separates us as adults from our parents. Sports movies offer more than just the drama of winners and losers, or the journey from dream to achievement,
See full article at Moviefone »

Would James Dean have been a Newman or a Brando?

As newly restored versions of James Dean's three films come to BFI Southbank, John Patterson reflects on the star's enduring acting style

What if he'd lived, James Byron Dean? What if he'd never ploughed his Porsche Spyder into that oncoming station wagon, had won his auto race that afternoon in Paso Robles, and gone back to work after the weekend to reshoot his final drunk scene from Giant, the one he'd botched the week before?

Would he have had Paul Newman's career: expertly managed, disciplined, intelligent, building himself year upon year towards the iconic status he finally achieved, and two-page spread obits on his death? It's not implausible to think of Newman as someone who benefited directly from Dean's death he inherited Dean's role in the 1956 boxing picture Somebody Up There Likes Me or as an actor who many times in the late 50s and 60s played characters (Hud,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Brightest Star: Finding Your Place in the Universe After Being Dumped

Brightest Star: Finding Your Place in the Universe After Being Dumped
As indie films about self-absorbed young white men making bad romantic choices accompanied by a mixtape soundtrack go, Maggie Kiley's Brightest Star is a vast improvement over 2013's lethally quirky Somebody Up There Likes Me.

Brightest Star's unnamed male protagonist (Chris Lowell) bounces around life after getting dumped by his pert blonde girlfriend, Charlotte (Rose McIver), trying to woo her back while figuring out what he wants to do with himself, flitting between lifestyles and jobs in the consequence-free manner that only the truly privileged can get away with, and of course disregarding the brunettes he's clearly meant to be with.

Space and relativity and other science-y things also factor in the story, in a metaphoric, non-scientific way, w...
See full article at Village Voice »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites