Somebody Up There Likes Me
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6 items from 2015

Evolution of a Champ: The Rocky Film Saga

25 November 2015 11:04 AM, PST | CinemaNerdz | See recent CinemaNerdz news »

On March 24th, 1975, struggling actor Sylvester Stallone spent his last few dollars to see boxing champ Muhammad Ali fight Chuck Wepner. Thought to be an easy win, Ali surprisingly met his match: a career brawler who was having the fight of his life. Fifteen rounds and an Ali knockdown later, Wepner lost. But the scrappy no name fighter inspired Stallone, who emerged from a twenty-hour writing binge with a screenplay and an underdog character named Rocky Balboa.

The script quickly became a hot property in Hollywood, and several attempts were made to purchase it for stars like Burt Reynolds and Ryan O’Neal. But Stallone refused, knowing full well that no one could play the part like he could. Stallone eventually got his wish at United Artists, and under director John G. Avildsen, the rest became movie history. Released in 1976, Rocky was a global sensation, winning a Best Picture Oscar »

- Danilo Castro

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Academy Award Film Series: It Takes Eastwood to Get Enthusiastic Praise for Derivative, Mostly Predictable Father Figure Melo

6 October 2015 5:33 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

'Million Dollar Baby' movie with Hilary Swank and Clint Eastwood. 'Million Dollar Baby' movie: Clint Eastwood contrived, overlong drama made (barely) watchable by first-rate central performance Fresh off the enthusiastically received – and insincere – Mystic River, Clint Eastwood went on to tackle the ups and downs of the boxing world in the 2004 melo Million Dollar Baby. Despite the cheery title, this is not the usual Rocky-esque rags-to-riches story of the determined underdog who inevitably becomes a super-topdog once she (in this case it's a “she”) puts on her gloves, jumps into the boxing ring, and starts using other women as punching bags. That's because about two-thirds into the film, Million Dollar Baby takes a radical turn toward tragedy that is as unexpected as everything else on screen is painfully predictable. In fact, once the dust is settled, even that last third quickly derails into the same sentimental mush Eastwood and »

- Andre Soares

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Popular Disney Actor and Broadway Performer Jones Dead at 84

2 September 2015 2:26 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Dean Jones: Actor in Disney movies. Dean Jones dead at 84: Actor in Disney movies 'The Love Bug,' 'That Darn Cat!' Dean Jones, best known for playing befuddled heroes in 1960s Walt Disney movies such as That Darn Cat! and The Love Bug, died of complications from Parkinson's disease on Tue., Sept. 1, '15, in Los Angeles. Jones (born on Jan. 25, 1931, in Decatur, Alabama) was 84. Dean Jones movies Dean Jones began his Hollywood career in the mid-'50s, when he was featured in bit parts – at times uncredited – in a handful of films at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer In 2009 interview for Christianity Today, Jones recalled playing his first scene (in These Wilder Years) with veteran James Cagney, who told him “Walk to your mark and remember your lines” – supposedly a lesson he would take to heart. At MGM, bit player Jones would also be featured in Robert Wise's »

- Andre Soares

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Dean Jones, Star of The Love Bug, Dies at Age 84

2 September 2015 1:35 PM, PDT | Us Weekly | See recent Us Weekly news »

Dean Jones, who starred in multiple Disney movies and was perhaps best known for playing race-car driver Jim in 1968’s The Love Bug, died on Tuesday, Sept. 1, in Los Angeles at age 84. According to The Hollywood Reporter, his publicist, Richard Hoffman, said the actor passed away due to complications from Parkinson’s disease. Jones made his acting debut as an uncredited soldier in 1956’s Somebody Up There Likes Me, which starred Paul Newman, and moved on to other television and film roles. But it was with [...] »

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Dean Jones, ‘The Love Bug’ Star, Dies at 84

2 September 2015 1:10 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Actor Dean Jones, best known for his acting work in such Disney films as “The Love Bug” and “That Darn Cat,” died of Parkinson’s disease Tuesday in Los Angeles. He was 84.

In addition to his appearances in films like “Under the Yum-Yum Tree,” “The Shaggy D.A.,” “The Million Dollar Duck,” “Snowball Express,” “Herbie Goes to Monte Carlo” and “Beethoven,” Jones also had roles in five Broadway shows and appeared in numerous television series and specials. Overall, he appeared in 46 films over the course of his career.

Jones was born in Decatur, Ala., and served in the Navy during the Korean War. He attended Asbury University in Kentucky, which awarded him with an honorary degree in 2002.

The actor made his Broadway debut with “There Was A Little Girl” with Jane Fonda in 1960, and would go on to star in Broadway’s “Under the Yum-Yum Tree” that same year, before starring »

- Alex Stedman

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'Birdman' cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki joins exclusive club with Oscar win

22 February 2015 7:29 PM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

By winning the Best Cinematography Oscar for a second year in a row, "Birdman" director of photography Emmanuel Lubezki has joined a truly elite club whose ranks haven't been breached in nearly two decades. Only four other cinematographers have won the prize in two consecutive years. The last time it happened was in 1994 and 1995, when John Toll won for Edward Zwick's "Legends of the Fall" and Mel Gibson's "Braveheart" respectively. Before that you have to go all the way back to the late '40s, when Winton Hoch won in 1948 (Victor Fleming's "Joan of Arc" with Ingrid Bergman) and 1949 (John Ford's western "She Wore a Yellow Ribbon"). Both victories came in the color category, as the Academy awarded prizes separately for black-and-white and color photography from 1939 to 1956. Leon Shamroy also won back-to-back color cinematography Oscars, for Henry King's 1944 Woodrow Wilson biopic "Wilson" and John M. Stahl »

- Kristopher Tapley

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6 items from 2015, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

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