Richard III
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13 items from 2011


The roles of their lives

23 October 2011 4:05 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

For Mark Rylance, it's Rooster in Jerusalem. For Alison Steadman, it's Bev in Abigail's Party … leading actors on the parts they will never escape

Mark Rylance

Plays Johnny "Rooster" Byron in Jerusalem by Jez Butterworth, which opened at the Royal Court in 2009 and travelled to Broadway. It has just returned to London, where it is showing at the Apollo theatre in the West End.

Jerusalem first came to me in 2003, when I was too busy running the Globe. Back then it was called St George's Day. The pages were written with an old typewriter and it was very raw, so different to anything else. Sometimes, instead of characters' names, there was just pages of dialogue. It reminded me of how much as a kid I had resonated with adults outside of society, how much I liked their language and stories.

I got busy with other projects and they saw other actors. »

- Nosheen Iqbal

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The roles of their lives

23 October 2011 4:05 PM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

For Mark Rylance, it's Rooster in Jerusalem. For Alison Steadman, it's Bev in Abigail's Party … leading actors on the parts they will never escape

Mark Rylance

Plays Johnny "Rooster" Byron in Jerusalem by Jez Butterworth, which opened at the Royal Court in 2009 and travelled to Broadway. It has just returned to London, where it is showing at the Apollo theatre in the West End.

Jerusalem first came to me in 2003, when I was too busy running the Globe. Back then it was called St George's Day. The pages were written with an old typewriter and it was very raw, so different to anything else. Sometimes, instead of characters' names, there was just pages of dialogue. It reminded me of how much as a kid I had resonated with adults outside of society, how much I liked their language and stories.

I got busy with other projects and they saw other actors. »

- Nosheen Iqbal

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Jesper Christensen on the Fine Art of Playing a Nazi Gynecologist

26 August 2011 1:00 PM, PDT | Speakeasy/Wall Street Journal | See recent Speakeasy/Wall Street Journal news »

Getty Jesper Christensen

The Debt,” a new espionage thriller coming out next week, promises to do for gynecology what the 1976 film “Marathon Man” did for dentistry.

The film, a big-budget adaptation of an obscure 2007 Israeli movie called “Ha-Hov”—it means “The Debt” in Hebrew—stars Helen Mirren as Rachel Singer, a former Mossad agent with a troubled conscience stemming from a botched 1967 mission to capture a Nazi war criminal.

The acclaimed Danish actor Jesper Christensen gives a riveting performance as Singer’s nemesis, »

- Rachel Dodes

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A Journey Through the Eclipse Series: Alexander Korda’s Rembrandt

11 July 2011 12:00 PM, PDT | CriterionCast | See recent CriterionCast news »

This coming Friday, July 15, marks the birthday of the greatest of all Dutch painters, Rembrandt van Rijn. Born 505 years ago, I figured now was as suitable an occasion as I’d ever have to review Rembrandt, this fine biopic from 1936 starring Charles Laughton, part of Eclipse Series 16: Alexander Korda’s Private Lives.

Korda is one of the most influential and dynamic figures in the history of UK cinema, founder of London Films and the first man ever granted knighthood for his work in the English film industry. Along with his brothers Zoltan and Vincent, he played a major part in creating some of the most fondly remembered British films of the 1930s, 40s and 50s, including The Scarlet Pimpernel, The Four Feathers, That Hamilton Woman, The Thief of Bagdad, The Third Man and Laurence Olivier’s version of Richard III.

As anyone who’s paid even the slightest attention »

- David Blakeslee

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Remember Me: Michael Gough

18 March 2011 6:26 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Stars bring a character to life on the screen; but behind them is another kind of actor that brings life to that character’s world.  They are the seasoning which turns a good meal into a great meal, the chinking keeping a cold wind from blowing through the holes in a script.  Call them what you will:  supporting players, character actors, familiar faces, second bananas.  To most viewers, their names mean nothing, and a headshot over their obituary usually draws little more than an, “Oh, yeah, that guy!” They rarely get their due, often only at their passing, which, sadly, makes it time to give one of the best his due – Michael Gough, who died this week at the age of 94.

All of his obits usually start with saying he was best known for his role as Batman’s faithful butler Alfred in the Tim Burton version of Batman (1989) and its three sequels. »

- Bill Mesce

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Michael Gough obituary

18 March 2011 4:05 PM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Actor with poise and presence, best known as Alfred the butler in Tim Burton's Batman

The actor Michael Gough, who has died aged 94, was an arresting presence on stage, television and film for the entire postwar period, notably as the butler Alfred Pennyworth in Tim Burton's Batman movies. Eventually he just voiced roles, as with the Dodo Bird in the same director's Alice in Wonderland film last year, but always to striking effect.

Gough started in the Old Vic company in London before the second world war, but it took till 1946 for his career proper to get off to a flying start in the West End, in Frederick Lonsdale's But for the Grace of God. The fistfight-to-the-death scene was done with such startling verisimilitude that nearly all the stage furniture was demolished nightly, and Gough broke three ribs and injured the base of his spine. So copiously »

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Michael Gough obituary

18 March 2011 4:05 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Actor with poise and presence, best known as Alfred the butler in Tim Burton's Batman

The actor Michael Gough, who has died aged 94, was an arresting presence on stage, television and film for the entire postwar period, notably as the butler Alfred Pennyworth in Tim Burton's Batman movies. Eventually he just voiced roles, as with the Dodo Bird in the same director's Alice in Wonderland film last year, but always to striking effect.

Gough started in the Old Vic company in London before the second world war, but it took till 1946 for his career proper to get off to a flying start in the West End, in Frederick Lonsdale's But for the Grace of God. The fistfight-to-the-death scene was done with such startling verisimilitude that nearly all the stage furniture was demolished nightly, and Gough broke three ribs and injured the base of his spine. So copiously »

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R.I.P. Michael Gough (1916-2011)

18 March 2011 5:43 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Veteran British character actor Michael Gough has passed away aged 94 after a lengthy battle with illness, having enjoyed a career spanning seven decades and over 150 roles. Born in Kuala Lumpur in 1916, Gough first appeared in the 1946 TV movie Androcles and the Lion before making the transition to the silver screen two years later with a supporting part in producer Alexander Korda's adaptation of Tolstoy's Anna Karenina (1948, dir. Julien Duvivier). Other notable early screen credits included Richard III (1955, dir. Lawrence Olivier) and Reach for the Sky (1956, dir. Lewis Gilbert) along with a number of British horrors including Terence Fisher's Dracula (1958) and The Phantom of the Opera (1962) from Hammer Films.

Receiving a BAFTA TV Award in 1957, Gough continued to make extensive television appearances on cult shows such as Doctor Who, The Avengers, Blake's 7 and Colditz. He was nominated for a Best Supporting Actor BAFTA for his work in The Go-Between (1972, dir. »

- flickeringmyth

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Batman Actor Michael Gough Passes Away

17 March 2011 2:51 PM, PDT | BuzzFocus.com | See recent BuzzFocus.com news »

Genre TV and Movie fans are mourning the loss of British actor Michael Gough who died at the age of 94 at his home in England. He was best known in this country for playing Alfred Pennyworth, Bruce Wayne’s butler in the 80′s and 90′s Batman films.

Gough had a long and illustrious career including memorable roles in Laurence Olivier’s Richard III (1955, Out of Africa (1985) and The Citadel (1983). Genre fans will remember him though in multiple roles in British horror films throughout the 1960′s and 1970′s like Hammer Film ProductionsDracula (1958), Horrors of the Black Museum (1959), The Phantom of the Opera (1962), and Satan’s Slave (1976). Science-fiction fans may remember him in multiple roles in Doctor Who as Councillor Hedin and the Celestial Toymaker. He was nominated for a BAFTA Award in 1970 for his supporting role in The Go-Between.

In more recent years he became a staple of Tim Burton »

- Ernie Estrella

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Michael Gough RIP

17 March 2011 8:06 AM, PDT | EmpireOnline | See recent EmpireOnline news »

Michael Gough, the man known around the world as the most recognisable cinematic incarnation of Batman’s loyal butler Alfred Pennyworth during the 1980s and ‘90s, has died at the age of 94. But beyond his time spent cocking a disapproving yet paternal eyebrow at the likes of Michael Keaton, Val Kilmer and George Clooney, Gough was an accomplished actor on the stage and screen.Born in Malaysia in 1916, Gough launched his career on television, starring in BBC TV movie Androcles and the Lion. He then made the leap to the big screen with two films, both in 1948 – Anna Karenina and Blanche Fury.His time on screen saw him tackle everything from Shakespeare plays (Richard III, Julius Caesar and more) to Dh Lawrence adaptations (Women in Love) to epics such as Out of Africa. He also tapped his comedy side as Dr Paul Flammond in Top Secret!But when Tim Burton »

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R.I.P. Michael Gough

17 March 2011 6:02 AM, PDT | Dark Horizons | See recent Dark Horizons news »

Michael Gough, the beloved British character actor whom many will remember from the pre-Chris Nolan "Batman" movies, has passed away aged 94. Born in Kuala Lumpur, Gough made his film debut in 1947 in "Blanche Fury" and went on to achieve fame in British television.

He made two memorable appearances as villains in "Doctor Who" - first as the titular villain of the second Doctor serial "The Celestial Toymaker" in 1966, then as a Time Lord councillor in league with Omega in the fifth Doctor serial "Arc of Infinity" in 1983. He also married Anneke Wills, an actress who played one of the Doctor's companions on the show.

Gough's other memorable small screen turns include a famous episode of "The Avengers" as the wheelchair-bound Dr. Armstrong, and his role as the British Prime Minister in Ian Curteis' "Suez 1956".

His big screen credits are even more impressive with key roles in Harold Pinter's "The Go-Between, »

- Garth Franklin

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127 Hours and the one-armed box-office bandits

24 February 2011 4:00 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The tale of Aron Ralston's auto-surgery is leading the new wave of amputee pics that have flooded the box office in recent years

Both 127 Hours and True Grit are superb motion pictures that deserve to be honoured at the Oscars on Sunday. In the first, James Franco delivers a gritty performance as an outdoorsy loner who gets trapped in a deserted ravine and must rise to the occasion or die. In the second, newcomer Hailee Steinfeld plays a feisty cowgirl who will stop at nothing to bring her father's murderer to justice.

On the surface, these films would seem to have very little in common, other than the excellent performances of the young stars. Yet, there is in fact an odd connective tissue linking the films. Both movies feature indomitable protagonists who fall into a mountain chasm with two good arms and come out with just one. In 127 Hours, »

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Interview: Claire Bloom On A Great Career Spanning Chaplin Thru Firth

22 January 2011 12:44 AM, PST | Scott Feinberg | See recent Scott Feinberg news »

Yesterday, I had the opportunity so speak for about 30 minutes over the phone with the legendary British stage and screen actress Claire Bloom, one of the great talents and beauties of the past century. Bloom, who made her film debut 63 years ago and has co-starred with countless greats — among them Charlie Chaplin, Laurence Olivier, Richard Burton, John Gielgud, Rod Steiger, and Paul Newman — is still going strong at the age of 79. Most recently, she gave a brief but memorable performance as Queen Mary, the mother of King Edward Xiii (Guy Pearce) and King George VI (Colin Firth), in “The King’s Speech” (The Weinstein Company, 11/24, R, trailer), which the Screen Actors Guild rewarded with a best ensemble nomination.

Click Here To Listen To Audio Of Our Conversation!

Over the course of our conversation, Bloom and I discussed…

her early theater- and movie-going experiences/acting inspirations (her mother loved Shakespeare and »

- Scott Feinberg

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006

13 items from 2011


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