6.2/10
985
47 user 5 critic

The Opposite Sex (1956)

Not Rated | | Comedy, Musical, Romance | 29 April 1957 (Sweden)
Shortly after their tenth wedding anniversary, New York theater producer Steven Hilliard and his wife, former popular radio singer Kay Hilliard née Ashley, are getting a Kay-initiated Reno ... See full summary »

Director:

Writers:

(screenplay), (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
Reviews
Nominated for 1 Golden Globe. See more awards »
Learn more

People who liked this also liked... 

The Women (1939)
Comedy | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8/10 X  

A study of the lives and romantic entanglements of various interconnected women.

Director: George Cukor
Stars: Norma Shearer, Joan Crawford, Rosalind Russell
Certificate: Passed Adventure | Romance | Action
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.9/10 X  

Adventurer Allan Quartermain leads an expedition into uncharted African territory in an attempt to locate an explorer who went missing during his search for the fabled diamond mines of King Solomon.

Directors: Compton Bennett, Andrew Marton
Stars: Deborah Kerr, Stewart Granger, Richard Carlson
Musical | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.6/10 X  

Louis XI of France drafts Paris's popular "king" of criminals as Provost Marshal in his fight against usurper Charles of Burgundy and the traitorous nobles who rally around him.

Director: Michael Curtiz
Stars: Kathryn Grayson, Oreste Kirkop, Rita Moreno
Certificate: Passed Comedy | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.8/10 X  

Affluent Millicent and Oliver Jordan throw a dinner for a handful of wealthy and/or well-born acquaintances, each of whom has much to reveal.

Director: George Cukor
Stars: Marie Dressler, John Barrymore, Wallace Beery
Rain (1932)
Certificate: Passed Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.9/10 X  

A prostitute finds redemption in Pago Pago thanks to a hard missionary man.

Director: Lewis Milestone
Stars: Joan Crawford, Walter Huston, Fred Howard
Kings Row (1942)
Drama | Mystery | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.7/10 X  

The dark side and hypocrisy of provincial American life is seen through the eyes of five children as they grow to adulthood at the turn-of-the-century.

Director: Sam Wood
Stars: Ann Sheridan, Robert Cummings, Ronald Reagan
Comedy | Crime | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7/10 X  

Nick, Nora, and Nick Jr. investigate the murder of a band leader in New York.

Director: Edward Buzzell
Stars: William Powell, Myrna Loy, Keenan Wynn
Comedy | Drama | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.4/10 X  

An eccentric woman learns she is not dying of radium poisoning as earlier assumed, but when she meets a reporter looking for a story, she feigns sickness again for her own profit.

Director: William A. Wellman
Stars: Carole Lombard, Fredric March, Charles Winninger
Dead Ringer (1964)
Crime | Drama | Thriller
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.4/10 X  

The working-class twin sister of a callous, wealthy woman impulsively murders her out of revenge and assumes her identity. But impersonating her dead twin is more complicated and risky than she anticipated.

Director: Paul Henreid
Stars: Bette Davis, Karl Malden, Peter Lawford
Comedy | Musical | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.1/10 X  

Ella Peterson is a Brooklyn telephone answering service operator who tries to improve the lives of her clients by passing along bits of information she hears from other clients. She falls ... See full summary »

Director: Vincente Minnelli
Stars: Judy Holliday, Dean Martin, Fred Clark
Drama | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.6/10 X  

An aging actress travels to Rome with her husband; after he suddenly dies during the flight, she begins a passionate affair with a young gigolo.

Director: José Quintero
Stars: Vivien Leigh, Warren Beatty, Coral Browne
Anna Karenina (1935)
Certificate: Passed Drama | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.1/10 X  

The married Anna Karenina falls in love with Count Vronsky despite her husband's refusal to grant a divorce, and both must contend with the social repercussions.

Director: Clarence Brown
Stars: Greta Garbo, Fredric March, Freddie Bartholomew
Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
...
Crystal Allen
...
...
...
Gloria Dahl
...
Steve Hilliard
...
Buck Winston
...
...
...
...
Mike Pearl
...
Howard Fowler
...
...
...
Edit

Storyline

Shortly after their tenth wedding anniversary, New York theater producer Steven Hilliard and his wife, former popular radio singer Kay Hilliard née Ashley, are getting a Kay-initiated Reno divorce after Kay finds out about a marital indiscretion he had with Crystal Allen, a gold digging chorus girl in one of his shows. News of the indiscretion made its way to Kay indirectly by her catty friend, Sylvia Fowler. In Kay getting the divorce, Kay's best friend, playwright Amanda Penrose believes Kay is playing right into the wants of Crystal, whose main goal is not to be happily married to Steven, but to get what such a marriage can bring to her in material wealth and comfort. Amanda does not believe Steven loves Crystal and that he still really does love Kay. And Kay does proceed with the divorce despite believing theirs was a happy and loving marriage before she learned of the indiscretion, and despite having an adolescent daughter, Debbie, to consider. But when Kay learns some ... Written by Huggo

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

M-G-M PRESENTS THE BARE FACTS ABOUT...THE OPPOSITE SEX (original print ad - all caps) See more »


Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

29 April 1957 (Sweden)  »

Also Known As:

El sexo opuesto  »

Box Office

Budget:

$2,834,000 (estimated)
 »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

(as Perspecta Sound)| (Westrex Recording System)

Color:

(Metrocolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Alice Pearce, who plays gossipy manicurist Olga, would later create the role of nosy Gladys Kravitz on TV's "Bewitched". She played the role until her death, when she was replaced with another actress. See more »

Goofs

When Kay shakes her hands in the air when she says, "I've had a whole year to grow claws, Lexie! Jungle Red!", she's wearing clear nail polish. In the next scene, at the nightclub, she has on red nail polish. See more »

Quotes

Debbie: I don't think I should go away with you, Mother, but please don't think it's because I fell out of love with you.
See more »

Crazy Credits

Opening credits: Manhattan Island ... A body of land consisting of four million square males-completely surrounded by women. See more »

Connections

Version of Stage on Screen: The Women (2002) See more »

Soundtracks

Young Man With a Horn
(uncredited)
Music by George Stoll
Lyrics by Ralph Freed
Performed and Danced by June Allyson, with horn solo by Harry James
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Why? More importantly, WHY???
4 October 2005 | by (Key West, FL, US) – See all my reviews

At nearly every turn, you'll hear the same thing, repeated ad nauseum: "Why can't Hollywood come up with something original?" If you think that sentiment is something new for this generation, all you need do is catch this the next time it's on Turner Classic Movies (or on DVD) and you'll discover a lack of originality is hardly New Age. MGM, for whatever reason, apparently decided to remake one of THE classic comedies of ANY age, let alone the 1930's, Clare Boothe Luce's "The Women", directed by George Cukor (perhaps the best director of women ever) starring Norma Shearer, Joan Crawford, veteran scene-stealer Rosalind Russell, and a whole crew of other very talented actresses. In the original, as it is already well-known, men may have been the topic of every conversation but NEVER were they shown on-screen (right down to the books, all written by women). The writing was arguably the crispest, sharpest, wittiest, played to the nth degree by a sterling cast and guided by peerless direction. Alas, in this remake, you get none of that. It's hard, really, to begin to say just WHERE the problem lies, but I'll start with the mildest offender: the men, absent on-screen in the original, are now on display for all to see and this twist does little, if anything, to help. Oh, sure: Leslie Nielsen is quite a hunk and does as well as anyone probably could with such a one-dimensional character, but he is the ONLY male to make any impact whatsoever, apart from Jeff Richards, who plays Buck, an ambitious country singer who's more than willing to help divorcees-in-the-making get over their pains: Richards is totally bland as can be, with a hilariously inept "southern" accent to boot. Then there's the direction: where's George Cukor when you need him?!?!? David Miller, as one look at his list of directorial duties will immediately make clear, wasn't exactly a Golden Boy when it came to helming films; save for two or three films, none of the movies he helped bring to the screen can even come close to being called "classics" and most are probably well-forgotten, a batting average well on display here, for the film as a whole is just THERE, rudderless and bereft of a sure hand. The screenplay also takes a handful of liberties with Clare Boothe Luce's classic, throwing in some "modern" twists and changing things about, here and there, and the effect is lethal. (Characters are melded into one, or used sparingly, or cut entirely.) And then there's the music - oh, the music! Oddly, though this is, officially, a musical, there really isn't much music to be found, which, judging by what music IS offered, ain't such a terrible thing: in a song-within-a-play number, Dick Shawn oversells it all, practically knocking the audience over the head; in another number, Joan Collins, as the man-stealing hussy once played by Joan Crawford, is asked to do the simplest dance moves and is as stiff as a board (it's a hoot!); the aforementioned Jeff Richards also offers up a number, the unforgettable "Rock and Roll Tumbleweed", the title of which provides you with all you need to know. The worst, though, is the film's star, June Allyson, whose husky voice seems perpetually off-key in EVERY tune. Allyson is also a major liability in other aspects: while I'm sure she's the sweetest person in real life, she was NEVER a very good actress, and CERTAINLY all wrong for the role of a goody-two-shoes wife whose husband leaves her for another, more exciting woman, a role originally portrayed by Norma Shearer. Where Shearer added bite to her performance, Allyson smiles stoically and offers moist eyes to the heavens, as if expecting a halo to suddenly appear atop her head, a head already bedecked with a severe, matronly 'do that is NOT flattering to a woman who's too old for the part to begin with (and if Allyson WASN'T too old for the part, well, honey, she LOOKS it!). Also a sore disappointment is Joan Collins, already type-cast, perhaps, as a tart, but those expecting "Dynasty"-style bitchiness should look elsewhere: Collins is a novice, and, while physically stunning, is too much the novice to really sink her teeth into the dialogue, which she rushes through as if she has somewhere else to be. She tries but it's no cigar. No cigar, indeed! Ann Sheridan is sympathetic as Allyson's truest friend but she's given almost nothing to do except look as butch as possible. (She's probably supposed to be an amalgamation of Shearer's mother and the "old maid" - read: lesbian - columnist from the original.) Joan Blondell is a welcome sight as the ever-pregnant friend but as another reviewer has so adeptly noticed, she's also a bit long-in-the-tooth for her role. Ann Miller, in the Paulette Goddard role, and Agnes Moorehead, as the Countess, do as well as they can, and aren't bad, really, but are really also given very little to do; in the case of Miller, it's mind-boggling WHY, in a musical, of all things, she's just there to model clothes. Only Dolores Gray, as sniveling weasel Sylvia Fowler, comes close to reaching the level expected by fans of "The Women", but she's still at a loss, thanks to a terrible script and fellow performers who just aren't up to the task. A director who doesn't care, stars woefully miscast, laughable musical moments, and an interminable pace all spell disaster. The only worthwhile aspect of sitting through it is as a period piece, a curiosity piece, a campy number or two, and to see a pre-"Dynasty" Joan Collins. Otherwise, a two-hour snooze-fest. You've been warned.


32 of 48 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?