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The Montecarlo Story More at IMDbPro »Montecarlo (original title)

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11 out of 12 people found the following review useful:

On the Riviera

6/10
Author: jotix100 from New York
27 December 2007

It's hard to imagine Dino Risi, a distinguished Italian director and writer being involved in this silly little comedy. "Montecarlo" was a product of the late 1950s era where it was inexpensive to shoot a film in Europe for little money. All that was required was a fabulous backdrop in which to set the action. Sam Taylor, its director, didn't bring anything new to the genre.

An icy Marlene Dietrich plays a woman with a lot of class, but no money to satisfy her taste for the best things in life. She is dazzled by Count Della Fiabe, who is also trying to recuperate his debts at the gambling tables of the famous casino. In order for him to attract the woman, who he thinks is his meal ticket, the poor Italian noble man enlist the help of the same people he owes money to.

The best thing comes toward the end when Marlene Dietrich sings "Back Home in Indiana" in a seedy bistro for the enjoyment of Homer Hinckley, who she feels will be the man to make her rich. All this takes place in the glorious French Riviera in all its splendor.

Vittorio DeSica, a marvelous actor/director, does what he can with a role that didn't have much for him. Marlene Dietrich is dressed to the nines by Jean Louis that showed her elegant figure well. Arthur O'Connell, a good character actor is the millionaire from Indiana. Jane Rose also appears in a small role.

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9 out of 9 people found the following review useful:

Continental Dream Team

5/10
Author: bkoganbing from Buffalo, New York
27 November 2009

A continental dream team of Marlene Dietrich and Vittorio DeSica team up for Montecarlo a place that was big news in 1957 because of a wedding that took place there. It was a natural that someone would have done some kind of Monaco based story because of the wedding of their reigning Prince Rainer to American film star Grace Kelly.

There was however little chemistry between Dietrich and DeSica. I think both of them did the film because of the opportunity to spend time on the Riviera. That's as good a reason as any I've ever heard.

The two stars are a pair of fortune hunters. Both have lost heavily at the gaming tables and each spies the other as a possible mark. When the horrible truth sinks in that they've only combined their debts they decide to team up and get richer respective partners. They decide on a father and daughter duo of millionaires.

Highlight of the film is Marlene Dietrich trying to seduce her mark Arthur O'Connell with a vamp version of Back Home In Indiana. Bet you never thought of that as a torch song. But when Marlene does it in her inimitable style it has possibilities.

But what I can't figure out is why DeSica was given 18 year old Natalie Trundy to go after. I mean the writers couldn't have had him trying to work O'Connell's sister instead of a daughter? He really comes across as a dirty old man. It's the main weakness of the film.

Among the supporting players is Italian comedian Renato Rascel who would co-star with Mario Lanza in The Seven Hills Of Rome the following year. He plays a pawnbroker who wants his tickets redeemed or Marlene's jewelry. Seems as though she had an agreement with Rascel's brother to allow her to wear the jewels for the casinos. Rascel wants an end to that practice and he and Dietrich have some great scenes together.

The wide screen color cinematography of Monaco and the Riviera are absolutely breathtaking. I'm glad color was used for this beautiful spot on the planet.

According to a recent biography of Marlene Dietrich, Vittorio DeSica had two great passions, pursuit of young girls in real life like Natalie Trundy and the gaming tables. He was a candidate for Gamblers Anonymous, DeSica when he won financed his films that way. Many a day's shoot was held up because of DeSica's late night hobbies.

Still Dietrich's legion of fans world wide will like the film and enjoy a glimpse of Montecarlo at the beginning of the Princess Grace story.

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2 out of 2 people found the following review useful:

Probably not a film appreciated by communists

7/10
Author: planktonrules from Bradenton, Florida
20 February 2012

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

Vittorio De Sica and Marlene Dietrich both play members of the nobility who live the high life but both are completely broke. Both have a plan--to find a rich person to marry and bail them out of their predicament. Unfortunately, they find each other--not realizing the other is no better off than they are. Both use all their charms and power of persuasion at the fancy resort town of Monte Carlo...but it's all for naught and they eventually realize their mistakes.

Soon, a rich American (Arthur O'Connell) and his young daughter (Natalie Trundy) arrive in Monte Carlo and Dietrich and De Sica decide to try to woo both of them, as a marriage to either of them could end their money troubles. However, he has an Italian accent and she has a German one--and they inexplicably poses as brother and sister when they insinuate themselves into these Americans' lives. What happens next? See the film yourself! Overall, a pleasant and inconsequential film made more enjoyable by the stars and the lovely locale. In fact, I think if the movie stank, it would STILL be worth seeing as the sites are breathtaking.

By the way, early in the film when the pair (Dietrich and De Sica) are shooting skeet, it's obvious the guns AREN'T loaded--not even blanks. It's kind of sloppy and silly to watch.

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6 out of 10 people found the following review useful:

a few high points among the low

Author: ronn mullen (ronnmullen@ozline.net) from florida, USA
26 October 2002

granted, this whole movie was a low point for Marlene and for Vittorio daSica as well. There is one great line in it, however: when asked by confidence man daSica why she never wears any jewelry (which she has hocked to pay for her stay in Monte Carlo) La Dietrich purrs, "Should I?" to which daDica responds, "Most women do." Dietrich points out, "Most women NEED to." Touche' -- The other high point for me in this mess is when Dietrich sings "Back Home Again in Indiana" -- as unlikely a possibility as there ever could be!

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6 out of 10 people found the following review useful:

a few high points among the low

Author: ronn mullen (ronnmullen@ozline.net) from florida, USA
26 October 2002

granted, this whole movie was a low point for Marlene and for Vittorio daSica as well. There is one great line in it, however: when asked by confidence man daSica why she never wears any jewelry (which she has hocked to pay for her stay in Monte Carlo) La Dietrich purrs, "Should I?" to which daDica responds, "Most women do." Dietrich points out, "Most women NEED to." Touche' -- The other high point for me in this mess is when Dietrich sings "Back Home Again in Indiana" -- as unlikely a possibility as there ever could be!

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1 out of 1 people found the following review useful:

Romantic fluff sinks like lead balloon

4/10
Author: peterjohndean from Belgium
30 June 2016

The whole film lacks sparkle and pace. Dietrich and De Sica look elegantly frozen in time as they mouth a dialogue stuffed full of half-baked innuendos. There is absolutely no chemistry between them at all. Dietrich looks as though she had been on a starvation diet and wiggles her way across the screen in some extremely tight dresses without the slightest hint of sex appeal. Even when the film was made it must have seemed old-fashioned. Now it looks as though dinosaurs still roamed the land. Just about watchable for the locations and as a curiosity for Dietrich fans. Technically, the film is interesting as being one of the first to use the Technirama process, which rivalled Cinemascope but used a larger frame size, so the picture is much clearer. Whether this benefited the actors is debatable but the scenery is pretty good. The whole film is available on YouTube but of course the quality is nothing like the original.

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2 out of 3 people found the following review useful:

Don't Gamble on this Monte Carlo **

Author: edwagreen from United States
5 September 2011

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

Marlene Dietrich sings back home in Indiana. Could you actually imagine her thinking about the moonlight on the Wabasse. She is not exactly Susan Hayward portraying Jane Froman. This is not also Falling in Love, which she sang to Emil Jannings in "The Blue Angel." (1930) After all, it's 27 years later.

This picture falls into the trap that it's so obvious. Two people try to make each other think that they're loaded so they can snatch each other in marriage. Both heavy gamblers, Vittorio De Sica and Dietrich try to play each other literally at the tables. The obvious truth is that they fall for each other and confess their indiscretions. Along comes wealthy Indianan Arthur O'Connell, a widower with a teenage daughter. The latter actually falls for De Sica, while Dietrich sings the above song.

The ending along both boats is so predictable. The scenery is great, but the film itself is a stinker.

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2 out of 4 people found the following review useful:

aging star fluff

1/10
Author: filmalamosa from United States
5 December 2012

Impossible to believe formula fluff garbage with aging stars. Marlena Dietrich at 56 has to decide between two suitors a broke Italian aristocrat (like herself) or an unsophisticated American millionaire. Vittoria De Sica (56) turns down an 18 year old millionaires daughter to be with Dietrich. Give me a break.

Then there is the feel good old sophisticated Europe versus the brash hick nouveau riche United States element.

The color and filming is well done in this complete fairy tale.

Watch only if you are fans of these aging stars.

DO NOT RECOMMEND

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3 out of 7 people found the following review useful:

Gambling with Marlene

5/10
Author: Eric Sayettat (sayettat@hotmail.com) from Champ sur Drac, France
4 May 2000

Let's face it, the movie is stupid... but there is Marlene and she adds flare and panache to the action.

Monte Carlo : pennyless European aristocrats with style and rich Americans with... less style but cruising on luxury yatchs...

A world of gamblers and high society, a world of the past as the one-armed-bandits have now replaced the "chemin de fer". Less style indeed but more money...

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6 out of 13 people found the following review useful:

Marlene glitters but the film doesn't!

Author: tophoca (tophoca@hotmail.com) from Mersin 10 Turkey
20 November 2004

Why on earth Marlene Dietrich got involved in this nonsense is beyond me. She must have been short of cash to have even considered appearing in this load of tosh.

The plot, such as it is, is thin involving a group of 'society gamblers' in Monte Carlo. Marlene wears some great clothes and generally glitters in contrast to de Sica who appears as dim as a Toc H lamp!

The one bright spot in this whole sorry saga is Marlene's rendition of "Back Home Again In Indiana" Not that she had any connection with the state, I bet Marlene wished she was back in Indiana!

This, along with her appearance in the 1944 version of "Kismit" just has to be Dietrich's darkest hour (or two) !

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