The Man Who Knew Too Much
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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

9 items from 2017


C.O. 'Doc' Erickson dead at 93

30 June 2017 12:37 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

The producer and production manager associated with Chinatown and Groundhog Day, died on Wednesday from heart complications.

Born on December 17,1923, C.O. ‘Doc’ Erickson was living in Las Vegas when he died from heart complications, according to The Gersh Agency.

Erickson began his career at Paramount Pictures, serving as production manager on five Alfred Hitchcock films during the mid-to-late 1950s, including Rear Window, To Catch A Thief, The Trouble With Harry, The Man Who Knew Too Much and Vertigo.

The producer left Paramount in the early 1960s to become John Huston’s associate producer on The Misfits, Freud, and 1967s Reflections In A Golden Eye.

He went on to serve as production manager on Joseph L Mankiewicz’s There Was A Crooked Man and also spent three years supervising film production for Brut Productions.

He would later become associated with Robert Evans on Chinatown, Players, Urban Cowboy, and Popeye.

Other producer-production credits include 55 Days At Peking, [link »

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C.O. ‘Doc’ Erickson, Alfred Hitchcock Associate, Dies at 93

30 June 2017 11:29 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Longtime motion picture producer and executive C.O. “Doc” Erickson, who worked on Alfred Hitchcock’s movies along with “Chinatown,” “Blade Runner,” and “Groundhog Day,” died Wednesday in Las Vegas due to heart complications. He was 93.

He began his career at Paramount Pictures, serving as production manager on five Hitchcock films: “Rear Window” (1954), “To Catch a Thief” (1955), “The Trouble with Harry” (1955), “The Man Who Knew Too Much” (1956), and “Vertigo” (1958).

He left Paramount to become John Huston’s associate producer on “The Misfits” (1961), “Freud” (1962), and “Reflections in a Golden Eye” (1967). He was production manager on Joseph L. Mankiewicz’s “There Was a Crooked Man…” (1970).

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Celebrities Who Died in 2017

Erickson spent three years supervising film production for Brut Productions and later became associated with Robert Evans on “Chinatown” (1974), “Players” (1979), “Urban Cowboy” (1980), and “Popeye” (1980). Other producer/production credits include “55 Days at Peking” (1963), “Magic” (1978), “Blade Runner” (1982), “Nicholas and Alexandra” (1971), “Fast Times at Ridgemont High” (1982), “The Lonely Guy” (1984), “Stuart Saves His Family” (1995), and »

- Dave McNary

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Alfred Hitchcock: The Six Decades and 54 Movie Posters That Define His Career

12 June 2017 10:06 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

With a career spanning six decades, Alfred Hitchcock remains the most influential filmmaker of all time. And while many of his later films are well known, there are also numerous titles to explore during the earliest part of his career in the 1920s.

Read More: How Alfred Hitchcock, ‘Lawrence of Arabia’ and More Influenced Wes Anderson — Watch

While Hitchcock started making a name for himself in the 1930s with films like “The Man Who Knew Too Much” and “The 39 Steps,” he really hit his stride during the 1940s with “Rebecca, “Foreign Correspondent” and “Suspicion.” By the next decade, Hitchcock was creating some of the most iconic films of all time with “Rear Window” and “Vertigo.”

In the 1960s, Hitchcock showed no signs of slowing down, transforming the horror genre with “Psycho” and “The Birds.” Even in one of his final films, “Frenzy,” Hitchcock still showcased his ability to shock audiences. »

- Jamie Righetti

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'The Man Who Knew Too Much': THR's 1956 Review

30 May 2017 8:54 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

On June 1, 1956, Alfred Hitchcock's thriller The Man Who Knew Too Much, featuring James Stewart and Doris Day, hit theaters stateside. The Hollywood Reporter's original review is below.

A suspense film that can run two hours without the audience getting restless must be pretty good. Alfred Hitchcock's The Man Who Knew Too Much, screenplayed by John Michael Hayes from a story by Charles Bennett and D.B. Wyndham-Lewis, meets this test. 

Hitchcock fans have reached the "show-me" point where they practically challenge him to bring forth enough new cinema inventiveness to hold them on the edge of their seats »

- THR Staff

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Hitchcock/Truffaut – Review

30 April 2017 5:21 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

I was 12 years old in 1968. One of my favorite places was the library, in those days the closest library to us was the Tesson Ferry Branch in South St. Louis County. My most prized possession was my library card.

My Mother used to drop me off there on a Saturday or a summer weekday and I would spend the whole day reading. One of those days I pulled a book off the shelf called Hitchcock/Truffaut and sat down to read it. I knew who Alfred Hitchcock was from his television show, and from his monthly Mystery Magazine as well as anthologies that I was reading avidly, Tales That Frightened Even Me, More Tales for the Nervous and, my favorite, Stories to be Read After Dark.

I was aware that Alfred Hitchcock was most renowned for directing movies. I had seen a few on television, Saboteur was a mainstay on Kplr TV, »

- Sam Moffitt

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The Truth About Zardoz, Plus Nine Other Things I Learned At Tcmff 2017

15 April 2017 12:49 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Just back from the 2017 TCM Classic Movie Festival with a few thoughts and thoughts about thoughts. I certainly held my reservations about this year’s edition, and though I ultimately ended up tiring early of flitting about from theater to theater like a mouse in a movie maze (it happens to even the most fanatically devoted of us on occasion, or so I’m told), there were, as always, several things I learned by attending Tcmff 2017 as well.

1) TCM Staffers Are Unfailingly Polite And Helpful

Thankfully I wasn’t witness, as I have been in past years, to any pass holders acting like spoiled children because they had to wait in a long queue or, heaven forbid, because they somehow didn’t get in to one of their preferred screenings. Part of what makes the Tcmff experience as pleasant as it often is can be credited to the tireless work »

- Dennis Cozzalio

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A Tcmff 2017 Preamble

6 April 2017 9:08 AM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

“It’s the most wonderful time/Of the year…” – Andy Williams

Well, yes and no. There is, after all, still about a week and a half to go before we can put the long national, annual nightmare of the tax season behind us. But it’s also film festival season, which for me specifically means the onset of the 2017 TCM Classic Film Festival, the eighth iteration of what has become a perennial moviegoing event. More and more people flock to Hollywood Boulevard each year from all reaches of the country, and from other countries, to revel in the history of Hollywood and international filmmaking, celebrate their favorite stars (including, this year, beloved TCM host Robert Osborne, who died earlier this year and whose presence has been missed at the festival for the past two sessions) and enjoy a long-weekend-sized bout of nostalgia for the movie culture being referred to when »

- Dennis Cozzalio

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TCM Classic Film Festival 2017 Starts Today!

6 April 2017 6:00 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Greetings, classic Hollywood fans! Anne Marie, here, returning to the blog! The sun is shining, the stars on Hollywood Blvd are gleaming, and there's been an uptick of tourists taking pictures of Bette Davis's handprints outside the Tcl Chinese Theatre, all of which mean just one thing: it's time for the TCM Classic Film Festival! 

This year, the most explosive news of the festival is the screening of several movies on nitrate film. TCM has always prided itself on screening 35mm at its festival side by side with new digital restorations. However, projecting nitrate prints requires a retrofit of the projection booths that handle the infamously flammable film stock. Fortunately, the Egyptian Theatre in Hollywood recently underwent just such a renovation thanks the Hollywood Foreign Press, The Film Foundation, and Turner Classic Movies. As a result, movies ranging from Laura to Black Narcissus and the original The Man Who Knew Too Much »

- Anne Marie

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An April To-Do List for Film Buffs in L.A.

2 April 2017 3:23 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

TCM Classic Film Festival | 6712 Hollywood Blvd.

The TCM Classic Film Festival, arguably Los Angeles’ most anticipated annual cinephile event, returns to multiple venues throughout the heart of Hollywood this year, featuring another diverse array of classics both beloved and ripe for rediscovery. Of particular note is a quartet of nitrate prints screening at the Egyptian Theatre, newly outfitted to handle this most volatile and vivid of celluloid materials. One nitrate print will screen each day of the event, beginning with Alfred Hitchcock’s original British production of The Man Who Knew Too Much (Thursday), and followed by Otto Preminger’s »

- Jordan Cronk

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

9 items from 2017


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