The Man Who Knew Too Much
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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

8 items from 2015


Today in Movie Culture: The Influence of 'Star Wars,' Celebrating Alfred Hitchcock's Birthday and More

13 August 2015 11:00 PM, PDT | Movies.com | See recent Movies.com news »

Here are a bunch of little bites to satisfy your hunger for movie culture:   Filmmaking Lesson of the Day: Frame by Frame shows us how to shoot a subjective drug trip sequence like the one in Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas:   Vintage Image of the Day: Alfred Hitchcock, who was born on this date in 1899, is either being fed some birthday cake by Doris Day (on her birthday, supposedly) or is in danger of being stabbed with a cake-covered knife. James Stewart looks on, as this is during the making of The Man Who Knew Too Much.   Scene Analysis of the Day: CineFix looks at the already iconic hallway fight scene from Christopher Nolan's Inception and the practical effects used to make it...

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- Christopher Campbell

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'Mission: Impossible - Rogue Nation': Exploring Easter Eggs, Set Pieces, Stunts, Homages and Other Odds and Ends

5 August 2015 9:26 AM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

Photo: Paramount Pictures Note: This article contains spoilers for Mission: Impossible - Rogue Nation. If you haven't yet seen the movie, you've been warned. I love listening to podcasts. Whether I'm driving across town, going for a run, cleaning my house or relaxing on the couch, you're likely to find me playing a podcast to help score the scene. Some podcasts are better than others, but if you enjoy learning about movies and everything that goes into making them I encourage you to check out "The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith", in which the titular host sits down with actors, directors and writers to discuss what it takes to bring a film to the screen, from both a business standpoint and a creative one. Together they break down scenes, give background, tell stories and lend perspective on a film that listeners might not otherwise hear. Goldsmith's most recent episode is »

- Jordan Benesh

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Nova Pilbeam obituary

26 July 2015 7:49 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Stage and screen actor who appeared in Hitchcock’s The Man Who Knew Too Much and Young and Innocent

Among the many might-have-beens in film history was the starring of Nova Pilbeam opposite Laurence Olivier in Rebecca (1940), Alfred Hitchcock’s first Hollywood film. The producer, David O Selznick, desperately wanted Pilbeam, who has died aged 95, for the female lead of Mrs de Winter, and was willing to offer her a five-year contract.

Pilbeam, who while still a teenager had already had important roles in two of Hitchcock’s films, The Man Who Knew Too Much (1934) and Young and Innocent (1937), was also hoping she would land the prestigious part, particularly since she had recently lost out to Margaret Lockwood in his The Lady Vanishes (1938). However, Hitch, after auditioning hundreds of young women, opted instead for the 22-year-old Joan Fontaine, claiming that the 20-year-old Pilbeam was not mature enough.

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- Ronald Bergan and Eric Shorter

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Nova Pilbeam obituary

26 July 2015 7:49 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Stage and screen actor who appeared in Hitchcock’s The Man Who Knew Too Much and Young and Innocent

Among the many might-have-beens in film history was the starring of Nova Pilbeam opposite Laurence Olivier in Rebecca (1940), Alfred Hitchcock’s first Hollywood film. The producer, David O Selznick, desperately wanted Pilbeam, who has died aged 95, for the female lead of Mrs de Winter, and was willing to offer her a five-year contract.

Pilbeam, who while still a teenager had already had important roles in two of Hitchcock’s films, The Man Who Knew Too Much (1934) and Young and Innocent (1937), was also hoping she would land the prestigious part, particularly since she had recently lost out to Margaret Lockwood in his The Lady Vanishes (1938). However, Hitch, after auditioning hundreds of young women, opted instead for the 22-year-old Joan Fontaine, claiming that the 20-year-old Pilbeam was not mature enough.

Continue reading »

- Ronald Bergan and Eric Shorter

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The Man Who Knew Too Much star Nova Pilbeam dies, aged 95

21 July 2015 10:59 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

The Man Who Knew Too Much star Nova Pilbeam has died, aged 95.

Pilbeam recently passed away after living in seclusion in London for more than 50 years, according to The Independent.

The British actress rose to fame at a young age in The Man Who Knew Too Much and Young and Innocent, two of director Alfred Hitchcock's pre-Hollywood movies.

She was later considered for the lead role in Hitchcock's Hollywood blockbuster Rebecca, only for Joan Fontaine to win the part when Pilbeam bristled at a five-year contract.

Her first marriage to Hitchcock's assistant Pen Tennyson ended when he died in a 1941 plane crash. A second marriage to journalist Alexander Whyte lasted until his death in 1972.

Pilbeam made her last screen appearance in 1948's Devil's Plot, and retired from the stage in 1951. »

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The Forgotten: John Brahm's "Broken Blossoms" (1936)

15 April 2015 8:28 PM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

This is a tale of chance encounters.1) René Clair is in London, making The Ghost Goes West (1935). Something of a flaneur, he has strolled down to the East End, and his noctivagation leads him to a Limehouse pub which strikes him with an intense but mysterious feeling of déjà vu."Of course!" he suddenly thinks. "D.W. Griffith: Broken Blossoms!" The pub is the very image of Griffith's Hollywood recreation of Victorian London from his 1919 film.And there, at the bar, sits D.W. Griffith himself. Clair approaches this mirage and learns that Griffith is in London to direct a remake of Broken Blossoms at Twickenham Studios. Drink is taken.2) All this comes from screenwriter Rodney Ackland's bittersweet memoir of his work in British cinema, The Celluloid Mistress, co-written with Elspeth Grant. He further explains that his idolisation of Griffith prompted him to volunteer his services in any capacity as »

- David Cairns

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Amazon Special: Save $200 On The Hitchcock Blu-ray Limited Edition Masterpiece Collection

24 March 2015 1:05 PM, PDT | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

Amazon is selling the Hitchcock Masterpiece Collection Blu-ray edition at a savings of $200.

The set consists of 15 classic movies:

Rope, Shadow of a Doubt, Rear Window, The Trouble With Harry, The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956 version), Vertigo, North By Northwest, Psycho, The Birds, Marnie, Torn Curtain, Topaz, Frenzy and Family Plot. 

 Every film is packed with sensational bonus features. 

Click Here To Order And To View Promotional Video For The Set 

  »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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Watch: Alfred Hitchcock’s Visual Gallery

5 January 2015 1:34 PM, PST | Filmmaker Magazine - Blog | See recent Filmmaker Magazine news »

Here is a rather comprehensive look at the visual motifs apparent throughout the formative years of Alfred Hitchcock’s illustrious career, from 1934’s The Man Who Knew Too Much to 1976’s Family Plot. Whether staging action around a staircase or riffing on the illusion of free fall, Hitchcock revisited and realigned techniques from one decade to the next. This compilation from Steven Benedict breaks down the visual grammar of 42 of the filmmaker’s features, stitching together his preferred still images with his swooping camera techniques, including a personal favorite: Gregory Peck’s Pov as he drinks a glass of milk in Spellbound. »

- Sarah Salovaara

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

8 items from 2015


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