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2015 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

18 items from 2015


Coleen Gray, star of film noir and Stanley Kubrick's The Killing, dies at 92

5 August 2015 9:02 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Actor who flourished during the 40s in films like Kiss of Death and Nightmare Alley, as well as Kubrick’s celebrated heist movie, has died

One of the last links to the glory years of the Hollywood film noir, Coleen Gray, has died at the age of 92. Gray was best known for her roles in the 1940s thrillers Kiss of Death and Nightmare Alley, both released in 1947 by 20th Century Fox for whom she was a contracted player, and for Stanley Kubrick’s The Killing, almost a decade later.

Related: Coleen Gray obituary

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- Andrew Pulver

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Coleen Gray, star of film noir and Stanley Kubrick's The Killing, dies at 92

5 August 2015 9:02 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Actor who flourished during the 40s in films like Kiss of Death and Nightmare Alley, as well as Kubrick’s celebrated heist movie, has died

One of the last links to the glory years of the Hollywood film noir, Coleen Gray, has died at the age of 92. Gray was best known for her roles in the 1940s thrillers Kiss of Death and Nightmare Alley, both released in 1947 by 20th Century Fox for whom she was a contracted player, and for Stanley Kubrick’s The Killing, almost a decade later.

Related: Coleen Gray obituary

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- Andrew Pulver

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Coleen Gray obituary

5 August 2015 4:32 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Actor who was often cast as the understanding girlfriend or steadfast wife in film noirs of the 1940s and 50s such as Kiss of Death and The Killing

The 2001 book Dark City Dames: The Wicked Women of Film Noir contained interviews with six female stars of the genre who were at their peak in the 1940s and 50s. One surprising inclusion was Coleen Gray, who has died aged 92. Surprising because she was seldom cast as a femme fatale in the classic film noirs in which she appeared.

In fact, Gray, with her pretty features, slightly pointed nose and wide eyes, was often the only ethical or innocent element in the dark, doom-laden crime dramas. In Kiss of Death (1947), she is the understanding girlfriend of an ex-con (Victor Mature), helping him to make a new life. In Nightmare Alley (1947), she is the steadfast wife and partner of Stan (Tyrone Power) in a carnival mind-reading act, »

- Ronald Bergan

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Coleen Gray, Star of ‘The Killing’ and ‘Kiss of Death,’ Dies at 92

4 August 2015 7:45 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Coleen Gray, best known for her role in Stanley Kubrick’s heist thriller “The Killing,” died of natural causes on Monday at her home in Bel Air, Calif. She was 92.

“My last dame is gone. Always had the feeling she’d be the last to go,” Eddie Muller, founder and president of the Film Noir Foundation, wrote on Facebook. He became friends with Gray while collaborating on his 2001 book “Dark City Dames: The Wicked Women of Film Noir.”

Gray played the accomplice of Sterling Hayden, the leader of a gang of thieves, in Kubrick’s “Killing.” She famously uttered the line, “I may not be pretty and I may not be smart …”

Gray appeared in a slew of films in the late 1940s and ’50s, primarily noir thrillers, including Henry Hathaway’s “Kiss of Death” (1947), as the film’s narrator and ex-con Victor Mature’s love interest; Tyrone Power’s »

- Maane Khatchatourian

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Early Kubrick Leading Lady in Classic Film Noir Dead at 92

3 August 2015 8:15 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Coleen Gray ca. 1950. Coleen Gray dead at 92: Leading lady in early Stanley Kubrick film noir classic Actress Coleen Gray, best known for Stanley Kubrick's crime drama The Killing, has died. Her death was announced by Classic Images contributor Laura Wagner on Facebook's “Film Noir” group. Wagner's source was David Schecter, who had been friends with the actress for quite some time. Via private message, he has confirmed Gray's death of natural causes earlier today, Aug. 3, '15, at her home in Bel Air, on the Los Angeles Westside. Gray (born on Oct. 23, 1922, in Staplehurst, Nebraska) was 92. Coleen Gray movies As found on the IMDb, Coleen Gray made her film debut as an extra in the 20th Century Fox musical State Fair (1945), starring Jeanne Crain and Dana Andrews. Her association with film noir began in 1947, with the release of Henry Hathaway's Kiss of Death (1947), notable for showing Richard Widmark »

- Andre Soares

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Stanley Kubrick's 13 movies ranked from worst to best

26 July 2015 1:30 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Stanley Kubrick was a sucker for order, so he might have appreciated the desire to catalogue his career. However, since his films often warn against placing too much faith in systems, perhaps he knew that this way madness lies.

Frankly, most of his films have fair claim to being number one, so establishing first amongst equals means some hard choices have been made along the way - just try not to trigger the doomsday device or start swinging the axe if you don't agree.

So without further ado, let's open the pod bay doors and enter the enigmatic, exceptional work of Stanley Kubrick.

13. Fear and Desire (1953)

Even a genius has to start somewhere. Already a successful magazine photographer and documentary maker, 24-year-old Kubrick directed his debut about a military mission on limited funds - it was shot silently with sound added later.

Plagued by difficulties, Kubrick later called it "a completely inept oddity, »

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Aalbæk Jensen plots 'Angelic Avengers' adaptation

12 May 2015 10:00 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Danish producer and Zentropa co-founder Peter Aalbæk Jensen is plotting a new English-language feature based on a novel by revered Out Of Africa author Karen Blixen.

The Angelic Avengers, published in 1946 under the pen name Isak Dinesen, is billed as “a Gothic romance”.

The film will be directed by Birger Larsen, who directed several episodes of Scandinavian TV noir The Killing as well as British TV movie Murder: Joint Enterprise.

The Angelic Avengers is the story of two young women abandoned and trying to cope with poverty and grief in 19th century Britain and France. An elderly Scottish cleric and his wife invite the girls to live on their estate in France, apparently kindly intentions.. But the girls discover that, under cover of piety and idealism, the clergyman and his wife lure young girls into their grasp into to sell them into the white slave trade. 

Jensen is looking for British partners for the project, which is likely »

- geoffrey@macnab.demon.co.uk (Geoffrey Macnab)

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Watch: Supercut Celebrates William H. Macy's Perfect Performances As Our Favorite Cinematic Losers

29 April 2015 2:23 PM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

A few years ago, in a conversation about Stanley Kubrick’s “The Killing,” a friend said of character actor Elisha Cook Jr., “It’s always fun watching him get abused and humiliated.” Not everyone can convincingly play losers and lowlifes so that you both pity and loathe the characters. One modern-day actor who has picked up where Cook Jr. left off, albeit with much more sadness, is William H. Macy. And a new video tribute highlights the sad and pathetic characters the actor plays. Read More: William H. Macy's Impressive Feature Directorial Debut 'Rudderless' Subtitled “Cinema’s Number One Loser,” the Macy tribute from Huffington Post’s Oliver Noble and Ben Craw (via Uproxx) runs just over four minutes and features the most famous sad sacks the actor has played, including Jerry Lundegaard of “Fargo,” Little Bill in “Boogie Nights,” George Parker in “Pleaseantville,” the desperate-for-love Quiz Kid Donnie Smith in “Magnolia, »

- Cain Rodriguez

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Daily | Welles, Costa, Sturges

14 April 2015 10:51 AM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

The Hollywood Reporter calls Josh Karp's Orson Welles's Last Movie: The Making of The Other Side of the Wind "an early contender for this year's best book about Hollywood"—and Vanity Fair's running a generous excerpt. Meantime, Jonathan Rosenbaum's posted his 2006 review of Simon Callow's biography of Welles. Also in today's roundup: Seven philosophers each pick a film to address an essential question. Zach Lewis on Jean-Luc Godard's Adieu au langage. A talk with Pedro Costa. Clayton Dillard on Preston Sturges's Sullivan's Travels. Steven Boone on Shirley Clarke's The Connection. Yusef Sayed on Sidney Lumet's The Offence. Kim Morgan on Stanley Kubrick's The Killing. And more. » - David Hudson »

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On the Hunt: The Films of James B. Harris

8 April 2015 9:46 PM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

CopAt the ripe age of twenty-six—the two were born within days of each other in 1928—James B. Harris and Stanley Kubrick formed Harris-Kubrick Productions. With Kubrick leading the charge behind the camera and Harris acting as the right-hand-man producer, the duo completed three major critical successes: The Killing (1956), Paths of Glory (1957), and Lolita (1962). But where Kubrick’s subsequent work has achieved a supreme, hall-of-fame stature, Harris’s own directorial career—consisting of five excellent movies made across a four-decade span—remains, despite the valiant effort of a few notable English-language critics (Michael Atkinson, Jonathan Rosenbaum), on the relative sidelines. The latest attempt to boost Harris’s reputation: BAMcinématek’s week-long retrospective of Harris’s producing and directing output, selected by “Overdue” co-programmers Nick Pinkerton and Nicolas Rapold.Harris and Kubrick stopped working together amidst a pre-production disagreement during the making of what would become Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb »

- Danny King

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Gotham, Episode 1.16, “The Blind Fortune Teller” foresees good fortune for Gotham’s future

16 February 2015 6:00 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Gotham Season 1, Episode 16: ‘The Blind Fortune Teller’

Written by Bruno Heller

Directed by Jeremy Hunt

Airs Mondays at 8pm Et on Fox

The season returns in stride with this week’s episode that is full of Batman mythology nods, with fun character moments that build momentum for the season’s subplots that are showing lots of promising development. At the center of the episode is the relationship of Gordon and Leslie, which is budding in interesting ways and is well integrated with the case of the week. The case of the week addresses two iconic Batman characters in one fell swoop, a bold attempt for the series that could’ve easily been a misstep. However, it is done efficiently enough that it will hold interest in the long run, as there are more stories that they could mine with the characters introduced here.

Fish’s plot is developing very quickly, »

- Jean Pierre Diez

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Blu-ray Review – The Killing (1956)

12 February 2015 10:50 PM, PST | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

The Killing, 1956.

Directed by Stanley Kubrick.

Starring Sterling Hayden, Coleen Gray, Vince Edwards, Jay C. Flippen, Ted de Corsia, Marie Windsor, Elisha Cook Jr.

Synopsis:

A group of men plan to steal money from a local race track, scrupulously planning the heist, and coming across a host of obstacles.

The Killing is rarely cited when referencing heist films such as Inside Man and Ocean’s Eleven, yet it is deeply imbedded in their – and many others’ – genetics. Coming from the great Stanley Kubrick, expect a film as carefully constructed as the caper within it. Even with a story that now seems standard, The Killing has barely aged, and despite some predictability (mostly thanks to a number of contemporary films copying its style) the finale packs a punch.

Building up to a perfectly devised conclusion, The Killing relies on a motif of meticulousness, with the loud diegetics of ticking clocks, the constant criss-crossing of people, »

- Gary Collinson

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‘The Killing’ Blu-ray Review (Arrow Academy)

12 February 2015 12:45 PM, PST | Blogomatic3000 | See recent Blogomatic3000 news »

Stars: Sterling Hayden, Coleen Gray, Vince Edwards, Jay C. Flippen, Ted de Corsia, Marie Windsor, Elisha Cook Jr., Joe Sawyer, Timothy Carey, Kola Kwariani, Dorothy Adams | Written and Directed by Stanley Kubrick

It goes without saying that film fans know that Stanley Kubrick was a master of his art.  All masters though have a starting point where they were learning and in some respects were yet to evolve into the legends that they would become.  With the Arrow Academy release of The Killing on Blu-ray, which also includes Killer’s Kiss we get to see a director who had a vision, but was yet to perfect his style.

The Killing is a heist movie that when it was first released didn’t make that much of an impact, but not surprisingly when it comes to Kubrick’s work has grown to be respected and revered as a true classic of the genre. »

- Paul Metcalf

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Maze Runner, Black Mirror, Kubrick’s The Killing – the best UK DVD and Blu-ray releases out today!

9 February 2015 8:09 AM, PST | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

It’s Monday, which means it’s time to empty your pockets in honour of the almighty New Home Entertainment Releases God for those in the UK. Here are our top picks out today (just click on the pictures to be taken to the order page):

The Maze Runner

When Thomas wakes up trapped in a massive maze with a groups of other boys, he has no memory of the outside world other than strange dreams about a mysterious organisation known as W.C.K.D. Only by piecing together fragments of his past with clues he discovers in the maze can Thomas hope to uncover his true purpose and a way to escape. Based on the best-selling novel by James Dasnher.

Black Mirror – Series 1-2 + Special

Series 1

1. The National Anthem: Prime Minister Michael Callow faces a huge and shocking dilemma when Princess Susannah, a much-loved member of the Royal Family, »

- Oli Davis

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Blu-ray Review – The Killing (1956)

9 February 2015 3:23 AM, PST | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

The Killing, 1956.

Directed by Stanley Kubrick.

Starring Sterling Hayden, Coleen Gray, Vince Edwards, Jay C.Flippen, Elisha Cook Jr, Marie Windsor, Ted de Corsia and Timothy Carey.

Synopsis:

Seven men are intent on executing the perfect robbery and taking a racetrack for two million dollars. But nothing goes quite as planned…

Kubrick’s third feature was something of a make or break for him. Given what happened following its release that may sound somewhat ridiculous, but in the film world of the mid-1950’s Kubrick, even at the incredibly young age of 28, truly needed a project that would show off his clear-eyed vision and premium levels of creativity and storytelling. His previous two features, Fear and Desire (1953) and Killers Kiss (1955) (also included as an extra on this release) had met with limited success, both financial and critical. The master-waiting-to-happen had to have a project to really put everything at his disposal into. »

- Robert W Monk

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The Conversation: Drew Morton and Landon Palmer Discuss ‘The Killing’

7 February 2015 9:21 AM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

The Conversation is a new feature at Sound on Sight bringing together Drew Morton and Landon Palmer in a passionate debate about cinema new and old. For their second piece, they will discuss Stanley Kubrick’s film The Killing (1956).

Drew’s Take

Stanley Kubrick’s The Killing (1956) is not my favorite work by the visionary director. In fact, the film probably wouldn’t even make it onto a list of my top five Kubrick films. Yet, with a career that included such amazing films as Paths of Glory (1957),Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964),2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), Barry Lyndon (1975), and The Shining (1980), that’s not an indication that The Killing is a film of poor quality but an indication that Kubrick’s body of work comes the closest to cinematic perfection than any director I can think of. Thus, while The Killing »

- Landon Palmer

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Stanley Kubrick, Legendary Director

1 February 2015 5:31 PM, PST | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

The works of Stanley Kubrick have changed film making forever. They have stood the test of time and only become more important and impactful as they age. For these reasons, we honor the legendary director and his most sucessful films.

In each genre of art there are certain individuals whose works transcend the eras of their creation to become something more than just art. These pioneers of culture push the boundaries of their respective crafts to deliver masterpieces that are truly timeless. Often times the true impact of their work is not properly recognized until many years after their work is released. Stanley Kubrick is one of these rare individuals. In the craft of making film, Kubrick was a visionary ahead of his time and on the leading edge of pop culture trends that helped define humanity in the 20th century. His abilities and talents as director, in particular, changed »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (G.S. Perno)

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See the New York City subway through the eyes of Stanley Kubrick in 1946

30 January 2015 11:03 AM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Before The Killing, Dr. Strangelove, 2001: A Space Odyssey, or even The Shining, Stanley Kubrick was a young artist with a passion for images. While he hadn’t made some of the greatest films of all-time yet, it seems like the director had a keen eye for people and places around him.

Dangerous Minds posted a series of photographs on Thursday that were taken by the future director during the summer of 1946 in the New York City subway for Look magazine, a competitor to Life. According to the site, Kubrick was just 16 years old, thus would begin a relationship with the magazine that would last several years, until he began making movies in earnest around the age of 23, in the early 1950s.

The photographs feature a self portrait of the filmmaker followed by shots of the people moving through the subway and interacting with each other including a couple standing »

- Zach Dennis

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2015 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

18 items from 2015


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