IMDb > The First Traveling Saleslady (1956)

The First Traveling Saleslady (1956) More at IMDbPro »


Overview

User Rating:
5.6/10   349 votes »
Your Rating:
Saving vote...
Deleting vote...
/10   (delete | history)
Sorry, there was a problem
MOVIEmeter: ?
Down 8% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers:
Devery Freeman (written by) and
Stephen Longstreet (written by)
Contact:
View company contact information for The First Traveling Saleslady on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
August 1956 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
She knows the ROPES and all the JOKES!
Plot:
At the turn of the century Rose and ex-showbiz friend Molly get involved in selling steel. When they... See more » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
NewsDesk:
(4 articles)
User Reviews:
Clint Eastwood's First Screen Kiss See more (15 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (complete, awaiting verification)

Ginger Rogers ... Miss Rose Gillray

Barry Nelson ... Charles Masters

Carol Channing ... Molly Wade
David Brian ... James Carter

James Arness ... Joel Kingdom

Clint Eastwood ... Lt. Jack Rice
Robert F. Simon ... Cal - Texas Rancher

Frank Wilcox ... U.S. Marshal Duncan

Dan White ... Sheriff (as Daniel M. White)
Harry Cheshire ... Judge Benson
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Abdullah Abbas ... Passerby on Sidewalk (uncredited)
Frank Baker ... Cattleman (uncredited)
George Baxter ... George the Headwaiter (uncredited)
Danny Borzage ... Courtroom Spectator (uncredited)
Lovyss Bradley ... Mrs. Bronson (uncredited)
Paul Bradley ... Cattleman at Desk (uncredited)
George Brand ... Telegraph Operator (uncredited)
Chet Brandenburg ... Courtroom Spectator (uncredited)
Gilmore Bush ... First Salesman (uncredited)
Nora Bush ... Mrs. Cobb (uncredited)
Fred Carson ... Passerby on Sidewalk (uncredited)
Ed Cassidy ... Theodore Roosevelt (uncredited)
Albert Cavens ... Cattleman at Desk (uncredited)
Lane Chandler ... Rancher (uncredited)
Gertrude Chorre ... Indian (uncredited)
Tristram Coffin ... Day Hotel Clerk (uncredited)
Cecil Combs ... Townsman (uncredited)
John V. Connors ... Second Salesman (uncredited)
Peter Croyden ... Bit Man (uncredited)
Roy Darmour ... Bit Man (uncredited)
Herbert Deans ... Secretary (uncredited)
Lester Dorr ... Salesman (uncredited)
John Eldredge ... Greavy - Prosecuting Attorney (uncredited)
Fred Essler ... Martin Schlessinger (uncredited)
Julius Evans ... Buyer (uncredited)
Franklyn Farnum ... Townsman (uncredited)
Stanley Farrar ... Buyer (uncredited)
William Fawcett ... Old-Timer Townsman (uncredited)
Adolph Faylauer ... Cattleman (uncredited)
Bess Flowers ... Diner at Muehlebach Hotel (uncredited)
John George ... Courtroom Spectator (uncredited)
Herman Hack ... Cowhand (uncredited)
Charles Hagen ... Cattleman at Desk (uncredited)
Bill Hale ... Sheriff's Deputy (uncredited)
Silver Harr ... Townsman (uncredited)
Sam Harris ... Courtroom Spectator (uncredited)
Jim Hayward ... Sam - Livery Stableman (uncredited)
Hans Herbert ... Night Clerk (uncredited)
Robert Hinkle ... Pete (uncredited)
Earle Hodgins ... Veterinarian (uncredited)
Tex Holden ... Cowhand (uncredited)
Art Howard ... Diner at Muehlebach Hotel (uncredited)
Theron Jackson ... Bellhop (uncredited)

Allen Jaffe ... Courtroom Spectator (uncredited)
Dick Johnstone ... Courtroom Spectator (uncredited)
Paul Keast ... Salesman (uncredited)
Colin Kenny ... Passerby on Sidewalk (uncredited)
Jack Kenny ... Courtroom Spectator (uncredited)
Ann Kunde ... Mrs. Pruett (uncredited)
Ethan Laidlaw ... Juiror (uncredited)
Mike Lally ... Courtroom Spectator (uncredited)
Kate Drain Lawson ... Annie Peachpit (uncredited)
Johnny Lee ... Amos (uncredited)
Pierce Lyden ... Outlaw (uncredited)
Casey MacGregor ... Old-Timer (uncredited)
Cactus Mack ... Rancher (uncredited)
Kathy Marlowe ... Model (uncredited)
Kermit Maynard ... Townsman (uncredited)
Mathew McCue ... Cattleman (uncredited)
Charles McQuary ... Cattleman (uncredited)
Harold Miller ... Assistant Prosecuting Attorney (uncredited)
Janette Miller ... Model (uncredited)
Belle Mitchell ... Emily (uncredited)
King Mojave ... Cigar Salesman (uncredited)
Deacon Moor ... Rancher (uncredited)
Ian Murray ... Prince of Wales (uncredited)
Tim Nelson ... Cowhand (uncredited)
Lynn Noe ... Model (uncredited)
Paul Palmer ... Cowhand (uncredited)
Hank Patterson ... First Cowhand in Courtroom (uncredited)

'Snub' Pollard ... Courtroom Spectator (uncredited)
Bob Reeves ... Cowhand (uncredited)
Tony Roux ... Courtroom Spectator (uncredited)
Jeffrey Sayre ... Courtroom Spectator (uncredited)
Frank J. Scannell ... Salesman (uncredited)
Scott Seaton ... Cattleman (uncredited)
Clint Sharp ... Cowhand (uncredited)
Cap Somers ... Courtroom Spectator (uncredited)
James Stone ... Rancher (uncredited)
Hal Taggart ... Gambling Croupier (uncredited)
Charles Tannen ... Buyer (uncredited)
Arthur Tovey ... Onlooker at Accident (uncredited)
Joan Tyler ... Model (uncredited)
Chalky Williams ... Joe Smith (uncredited)
Hank Wise ... Townsman (uncredited)
Britt Wood ... Second Cowhand in Courtroom (uncredited)

Directed by
Arthur Lubin 
 
Writing credits
Devery Freeman (written by) and
Stephen Longstreet (written by)

Produced by
Arthur Lubin .... producer
 
Original Music by
Irving Gertz 
 
Cinematography by
William E. Snyder (director of photography) (as William Snyder)
 
Film Editing by
Otto Ludwig 
 
Art Direction by
Albert S. D'Agostino 
 
Set Decoration by
Darrell Silvera 
 
Costume Design by
Edward Stevenson 
 
Makeup Department
Larry Germain .... hair stylist
Frank Westmore .... makeup supervisor
 
Production Management
Edward Donahue .... production supervisor (as Edward Donahoe)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Richard Maybery .... assistant director (as Richard Mayberry)
 
Sound Department
Stanford Houghton .... sound (as S.G. Haughton)
Terry Kellum .... sound
Bert Schoenfeld .... sound effects editor
 
Music Department
Irving Gertz .... conductor
 
Other crew
Dorothy Davenport .... dialogue supervisor (as Dorothy Reid)
Wayne Fitzgerald .... title designer (uncredited)
 

Production CompaniesDistributors

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
92 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Color (Technicolor)
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (RCA Sound Recording)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Originally intended to star Mae West.See more »
Quotes:
Molly Wade:What's your name?
Lt. Jack Rice, Roughrider:Jack Rice.
Molly Wade:You're handsome. And brave too I'll bet. You like girls?
Lt. Jack Rice, Roughrider:Yes, ma'am.
Molly Wade:Well, I'm a girl.
Lt. Jack Rice, Roughrider:[Grinning] You sure are.
See more »
Movie Connections:
Referenced in Clint Eastwood: Director (1982) (TV)See more »
Soundtrack:
A Corset Can Do a Lot for a LadySee more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
11 out of 13 people found the following review useful.
Clint Eastwood's First Screen Kiss, 6 August 2005
Author: theowinthrop from United States

This film is an interesting time capsule. It was made in the late 1950s, and it shows some stars who are on their way up, and one who is on her way out. An unfair thing to say to Ginger Rogers, but this is not one of the films (like KITTY FOYLE, her movies with Fred Astaire, THE MAJOR AND THE MINOR, or ROXY HART) that people remember her for. Ginger would still be making films until 1965, her last one an Italian comedy with Ray Milland, but they were all lesser efforts - although she did deliver good performances.

But three (no, make it four) of the stars actually were on their way up - or seemed to be. They are Clint Eastwood, Carol Channing, James Arness, and Barry Nelson. It was the sixth or seventh movie Eastwood had appeared in, and (I believe) the first one where he 1) had substantial dialog to give his film persona a real character, and 2) he was one of the male leads and was paired with the second female lead whom he romances, kisses, and marries. This is Ms Channing, playing "Molly", Rogers closest friend and partner in the saleslady business. Channing's character actually has better lines (at times) than Rogers did - funnier ones too. She is no budding feminist, but a rationalist (when she and Rogers are threatened for selling barbed wire in cattleman country, she suggests - reasonably - that they leave). It might strike a modern film lover as incongruous that Eastwood and Channing go off together at the end of this film, but in reality it's not so odd. Channing was always a greater Broadway star than Hollywood star (her best screen role would be in THOROUGHLY MODERN MILLIE, where she was Mary Tyler Moore's eccentric aunt who trounces Bea Lillie). She did not make more than a dozen or so films in her career. She is not more than five or six years older than Eastwood, and their pairing together is not so unlikely as it seems (the pairing of Nelson and Rogers is more unlikely). She too landed this role because her career (like Eastwood's) was on the rise - she just having won Broadway laurels in GENTLEMEN PREFER BLONDES as "Loralie Lee". Ironically, that performance was not captured by her on film, but Marilyn Monroe performed it. Also ironic is her pairing as Rogers' friend, as one of Channing's later hit performances was as Dolly Gallagher Levi in the original HELLO DOLLY, and she was replaced in it by Rogers.

James Arness had been in films since the late 1940s, appearing in several John Ford films like WAGON MASTER, John Wayne films like ISLAND IN THE SKY as well as THEM and some other science fiction movies. But in 1956, the U.S. public was getting used to Arness in the television western hit GUNSMOKE (as Marshall Matt Dillon). That role of a lifetime (literally) made his name and career - he was on the way to super stardom. So his performance as Joel Kingdom, ostensibly the villain of the film, is balanced by his sense of humor and his interest in possibly marrying Rogers.

The fourth figure was Barry Nelson. Nelson is an interesting person. He was a capable performer, and he did have one real good comic lead part in MARY, MARY. But while respected in the industry, Nelson never made it with the public. He was good looking but not striking (Arness has a more rugged handsome appearance, which stood him well in GUNSMOKE and other western roles).

Upon some reconsideration one can add a fifth figure - David Brian. A good looking man, who always looked like he had just left a hefty Board Room conference with fellow company directors, he gave some excellent performances in his career as good guy (he ends up with Joan Crawford in FLAMINGO ROAD) or bad guy. But like Nelson, while he was always employable he never caught on with the public. Here, he too is interested in Rogers. He reluctantly agrees to her selling the barbed wire in Texas, but he does so because when she fails he plans to marry her. All this does in the end is lead to him and Arness having a fistfight, but both discovering that Nelson has outmaneuvered them with another sigh of progress - Nelson's horseless carriage.

It is a sweet little film, but no more than that. My favorite moment comes in the hotel sequences. Rogers and Channing trick Arness into giving up his use of the PRINCE OF WALES suite in a cattle town hotel. They are looking forward, after dinner, to sleeping in this fancy room. They find a bald, bearded fat man snoring in the bed. It turns out it is Prince Albert Edward (the future King Edward VII) who has come to town after all, and has a running right to the use of the room.

Was the above review useful to you?
See more (15 total) »

Message Boards

Discuss this movie with other users on IMDb message board for The First Traveling Saleslady (1956)

Recommendations

If you enjoyed this title, our database also recommends:
- - - - -
Lightning Guns A Big Hand for the Little Lady The Tioga Kid Rip Roarin' Buckaroo The Dalton Girls
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
Show more recommendations

Related Links

Full cast and crew Company credits External reviews
News articles IMDb Comedy section IMDb USA section

You may report errors and omissions on this page to the IMDb database managers. They will be examined and if approved will be included in a future update. Clicking the 'Edit page' button will take you through a step-by-step process.