5.7/10
273
9 user 3 critic

Don't Knock the Rock (1956)

TV-G | | Music | 14 December 1956 (USA)
A disc jockey tries to prove to teenagers' parents that rock 'n' roll is harmless and won't turn their kids into juvenile delinquents.

Director:

Writers:

(screenplay), (story) | 1 more credit »
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On Disc

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Bill Haley's Comets (as Bill Haley and His Comets)
Alan Dale ...
Alan Freed ...
Alan Freed
The Treniers ...
The Trenirs
...
Little Richard
Dave Appell ...
Dave Appell
Applejacks ...
The Applejacks
Patricia Hardy ...
Francine MacLaine
Fay Baker ...
Arlene MacLaine
...
Gail Ganley ...
Molly Haines, Sister
...
Mayor George Bagley
...
Influential Citizen Tom Everett
...
Sheriff at End
Jovada Ballard ...
Jovada Ballard - Jitterbug Contest Winner
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Storyline

Arnie Haines is one of the stars of the new musical genre called rock 'n' roll. He is tired of touring, so he and his band decide to take a vacation in their hometown Mellondale. When they arrive, they are welcomed with great enthusiasm by the local youth. Mayor Bagley interferes and forbids them to play in the town, because he doesn't want them to demoralize the youth. The much-feared columnist Arlene MacLaine is brought to Mellondale by her daughter Francine, who is trying to cajole her mother to appreciate rock 'n' roll. But in Arlene's next column in nationwide media, she denounces Arnie Haines and rock 'n' roll. Francine contacts Arnie. On a visit to the beach they not only make up plans on how to change her mother's opinion, but also fall in love. Their plan is to organize a big rock 'n' roll show in the small town Friesville, and bring her mother there. The local mayor Tom Everett agrees to let them hire Friesville Palladium. His daughter Sunny is immediately infatuated by ... Written by Maths Jesperson {maths.jesperson1@comhem.se}

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

The kings of rock are rollin' back to the screen... in their biggest! See more »

Genres:

Music

Certificate:

TV-G | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

14 December 1956 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Hi Fi  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(RCA Sound Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

As with Rock Around the Clock (1956), all songs are performed lip-synched to previously released records. It's worth noting, however, that Bill Haley and the Comets' instrumental "Goofin' Around" seen performed here is a different take than the version the band released on record. See more »

Goofs

The dialog indicates that Arnie Haines' home town is somewhere in New England when he discusses going home for vacation, but the train that he gets off has the logo of the Sunset Limited on three cars. The Sunset Limited was a luxury train of the Southern Pacific Railroad that ran along the California Coast. See more »

Quotes

[Bill Haley walks up to a table with Arnie Haines and Alan Freed]
Bill Haley: How we doin', Dad, the newspaper gal diggin' us?
Arnie Haines: Yeah, real deep. She sounds like she has us plowed way under already.
Alan Freed: That's freedom of the press.
Bill Haley: Yeah, and I always thought that freedom of the press was a tailor who irons your suits for nothing. It shows you.
[everyone laughs a forced and phony laugh, and then they all get up and leave; Bill Haley looks offended]
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Connections

Featured in The South Bank Show: Little Richard (1985) See more »

Soundtracks

Goofin' Around
Written by Franny Beecher, Al Rex, and Johnny Grande
Performed by Bill Haley and the Comets
See more »

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User Reviews

Amazing Lindy Hop
30 March 2005 | by (North Carolina) – See all my reviews

I recently purchased this movie for the Lindy Hop scenes and I wasn't disappointed, the dancing is incredible. If only the movie opened with dancing instead of Arnie Haines and screaming teenagers! Once you get into the film there's dancing on pianos and couches in Arnie's apartment/hotel room?, a killer jam circle with Bill Hailey and the Comets backing, and a crazy Charleston scene that rivals anything I've seen on film. The plot was OK and the acting so-so, but the music and dancing makes up for the film's shortcomings. I was impressed with Bill Hailey and the Comets, especially during their instrumental jam session, which displays their musical talent and personality more so than their most well-known commercial hits.


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