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To Tell the Truth (TV Series 1956–2016) Poster

(1956–2016)

Trivia

Dorothy Kilgallen and Arlene Francis appeared on the November 8, 1965 edition of the CBS daytime series pretending to be Joan Crawford. At the time this was a relatively new gimmick on the show involving a guest celebrity. The three women appeared wearing black veils over their faces, and their voices were distorted by technicians. The panel had to determine who was the real Joan Crawford. This broadcast was videotaped six days earlier, on November 2. Kilgallen was found dead at home several hours before it was scheduled for airing. CBS still showed it, but the network assigned newscaster Douglas Edwards to announce her death immediately after the closing credits rolled. A short time thereafter CBS officials wiped the videotape, which they did to all daytime telecasts in 1965. No recording of it exists.
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The show was produced each week by a crew of 94 people.
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In one telecast, aired during the 1950's, Errol Flynn appeared as a guest celebrity. The two accompanying impostors were comedians Louis Nye and Don Knotts.
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On the January 18, 1965 broadcast, the panel of I've Got a Secret (1952)'Bill Cullen' , Betsy Palmer, Henry Morgan and Bess Myerson) replaced the panel of this show (Tom Poston, Peggy Cass, Orson Bean and Kitty Carlisle) in an event known as the "Night of the Big Switch". Ironically, Cullen would become a panelist on the syndicated version of To Tell the Truth (1956) several years later.
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For several years, the nighttime and daytime versions had two separate panels. However, in 1965 it was decided that the panel from the nighttime version would not only appear on that version but the daytime version as well in order to boost the ratings of the daytime show.
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The prime-time version was last broadcast was on May 22, 1967. The daytime version would stay on the air, however, for another year and some change until September 6, 1968.
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Future Dallas Cowboys Head Coach and NFL Hall of Famer Tom Landry, appeared on the show in 1956 as a decoy pretending to be a priest.
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Former Cleveland Browns quarterback, and future Pro Football Hall of Famer, Otto Graham once appeared on the show during the time he was coach of the Coast Guard Academy's football team.
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Henry Morgan and the show's producer, Mark Goodson, both appeared as decoys claiming to be Otto Preminger. They did this by wearing towels over their faces and hats on top of their heads.
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Garry Moore's son, Garry Jr., made an appearance on the show. Moore would later become host of the syndicated version when it premiered in 1969.
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The prize for each wrong vote on the daytime version was $100 while the nighttime version paid $250 for a wrong vote.
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Bill Todman once appeared as an impostor pretending to be Alan Young. He did this by wearing a veil over his face and by having his voice distorted.
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Motown founder Berry Gordy appeared on a 1965 broadcast of the show with his top act The Supremes. Also, none of the panel voted for him and he and the two imposters won the maximum prize of $1000.
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Peggy Fleming appeared on the show shortly after winning her first world figure skating title. She was still an amateur so she was forced to donate her winnings to the Amateur Athletics Union (the A.A.U.).
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Among those also considered to host the show were Don Ameche and Vincent Price. Ameche would later become a panelist on the show.
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The show's producer Mark Goodson once filled in for an ailing Bud Collyer. Two decades later Goodson filled in for Alex Trebek on the NBC revival of the show.
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The working title for the show was "Nothing But the Truth". In fact, a pilot was filmed with this as the title and the host was future 60 Minutes (1968) correspondent Mike Wallace.
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To Tell the Truth (1956) was missing from the CBS fall lineup in September, 1966 after 10 years on the air. The show returned on December 12, 1966 to the Monday lineup, where it had aired for six years. However, its time slot changed from 7:30 PM Eastern to 10 PM Eastern. It replaced the canceled The Jean Arthur Show (1966) a new sitcom which had lasted less than three months on the network.
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Orson Bean's father, George Burroughs, once appeared on the show. He was the chief of the campus police at Harvard University. As a result, Bean had to disqualify himself from the game.
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Sponsors for the show included Anacin and the Helene Curtis company.
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Famed jazz trumpeter Hugh Masekela appeared on the show along with his then - wife Miriam Makeba.
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John Charles Farrow, son of Maureen O'Sullivan and brother of Mia Farrow, once appeared as a decoy contestant claiming to be Olympic swimming champion Don Schollander.
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John DuPont, heir to the DuPont fortune, appeared on a 1966 broadcast. He was training in the sport of modern pentathalon and was hoping to make the 1968 Olympic team. He later would gain infamy for murdering Olympic wrestling champion Dave Schultz.
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Olympic diving champion Pat McCormick once appeared on the show pretending to be a female bullfighter.
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Film critic Rex Reed once appeared on the show impersonating a country singer.
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Future_"Hawaii Five-O"(1968)_ cast member Al Harrington was a contestant on the show. This was during the period when he was playing football for Stanford University and performing as a Polynesian dancer to pay for his tuition. For the record, none of the panel voted for him and as a result he and the two impostors pretending to be him won the full $1000 prize.
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See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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