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Eat That Question: Frank Zappa In His Own Words

Eat That Question: Frank Zappa In His Own Words takes its title from a song found on the composer’s 1972 fusion album The Grand Wazoo, and there may be no better preparation for the Frank Zappa revealed in director Thorston Schutte’s extraordinary documentary than this command to consume, and then presumably digest and defecate out, the sort of journalistic queries Zappa routinely endured, with patience, smarts and inescapable sarcasm, throughout his career. “Being interviewed is one of the most abnormal things that you can do to somebody,” Zappa explains during a TV interview to a reporter whose expression, an uneasy mixture of intimidation and confusion, remains constant throughout their encounter.

The composer’s testy relationship with the media is one of the threads that unites Schutte’s somewhat unusual approach—there are none of the usual associates, scholars and friends on hand to tell you secondhand (at best) what a genius Zappa was,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

‘Eat That Question: Frank Zappa In His Own Words’ Is A Doc For Fans & Newcomers Alike [Review]

  • The Playlist
‘Eat That Question: Frank Zappa In His Own Words’ Is A Doc For Fans & Newcomers Alike [Review]
In 1963, a young Frank Zappa appeared on “The Steve Allen Show,” where he used drumsticks and a bicycle to create a vibrant cacophony of sounds that must have been equally aggravating and fascinating to the generally square viewers of the program. After listening to Zappa’s bicycle-based orchestra, Allen gave a short speech defending artists […]

The post ‘Eat That Question: Frank Zappa In His Own Words’ Is A Doc For Fans & Newcomers Alike [Review] appeared first on The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Comedian Bill Dana, Who Played the Character Jose Jimenez, Dies at 92

Comedian Bill Dana, Who Played the Character Jose Jimenez, Dies at 92
Bill Dana, who created and starred as the earnest character at the center of the "My Name … Jose Jimenez" routine that made him one of America's most beloved comic performers of the 1960s, has died. He was 92.

Dana, who first appeared as Jimenez on The Steve Allen Plymouth Show, where he also worked as an Emmy-nominated head writer, died Thursday at his home in Nashville, Emerson College announced.

He and a fellow alumnus founded the American Comedy Archives at the Boston school, fulfilling a lifelong goal to honor the study and appreciation of the comedic arts.

Dana contrived...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Inside Rock Legend Fats Domino's World: Crawfish, Cards, Boogie-Woogie

Inside Rock Legend Fats Domino's World: Crawfish, Cards, Boogie-Woogie
When a friend of Fats Domino's invited filmmaker Joe Lauro to hang out at Domino's New Orleans house in the early 2000s, he knew he had to make a film about the rock & roll architect. More than a decade later, Fats Domino and the Birth of Rock 'n' Roll will air tonight, on Domino's 88th birthday. The film captures how the New Orleans pianist cut what many believe is the first rock & roll record, 1949's The Fat Man, and went onto sell 65 million records, making the Billboard pop chart
See full article at Rolling Stone »

New Frank Zappa Doc Wows at Sundance 2016

New Frank Zappa Doc Wows at Sundance 2016
It would be somewhat easy to do a straightforward documentary on Frank Zappa: zoom in on some grainy B&W pictures of him as an R&B-loving teen; chart his rise from Sixties avant-rock bandleader to symphonic composer, from antiestablishment iconoclast to anticensorship activist; interview some of the dozens, if not hundreds, of musicians inspired by him; drop in a few nuggets of We're Only In It for the Money or 200 Motels–era concert footage. Of course, Zappa was never one to do anything the easy, or easily comprehensible,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Sundance Review: 'Eat That Question: Frank Zappa In His Own Words' Is An Engaging Look At A Singular Artist

  • The Playlist
In 1963, a young Frank Zappa appeared on “The Steve Allen Show,” where he used drumsticks and a bicycle to create a vibrant cacophony of sounds that must have been equally aggravating and fascinating to the generally square viewers of the program. After listening to Zappa’s bicycle-based orchestra, Allen gave a short speech defending artists who have the courage to push the boundaries of their medium, ending it by wryly telling Zappa, “I congratulate you for your far-sightedness. As for your music, don’t ever do it around here again.” Allen’s opinion seemed to encapsulate mainstream music fans’ initial reactions to listening to Zappa: They might not like what they hear, but it’s hard not to respect his dedication and staunch professionalism when it came to finding new avenues in musical expression, regardless of what genre the music business was exploiting at any given time. Zappa always did his own thing,
See full article at The Playlist »

Pat Harrington Jr., 'One Day at a Time' Actor, Dead at 86

Pat Harrington Jr., 'One Day at a Time' Actor, Dead at 86
Pat Harrington Jr., best known for playing scene-stealing superintendent Dwayne Schneider on CBS sitcom One Day at a Time, has died at age 86. The actor had been battling Alzheimer's and was recently hospitalized following a fall, The Hollywood Reporter reports, and passed away Wednesday night in Los Angeles. 

"Dear friends, it is with the most unimaginable pain and sadness, that I tell you my father, Pat Harrington, Jr. passed away at 11:09 Pm this evening," his daughter Tresa Harrington wrote Wednesday in a Facebook post. "We were all with him today and tonight: crying,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

‘One Day at a Time’ Star Pat Harrington Jr. Dies at 86

‘One Day at a Time’ Star Pat Harrington Jr. Dies at 86
Pat Harrington Jr., best known for his role as the seedy super on “One Day at a Time,” died Wednesday night in Los Angeles. He was 86.

His daughter, Tresa Harrington, announced the news Thursday on her Facebook page. She did not reveal the cause of death, but wrote in November that her father’s health was rapidly deteriorating after being diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease.

“My heart is broken to pieces and I will cry and cry until I just won’t,” she said in the post.

Harrington won a Golden Globe (in 1981) and an Emmy (in 1984) for playing building superintendent Dwayne Schneider on the groundbreaking CBS sitcom, which aired from 1975 to 1984. The show starred Bonnie Franklin as an single mom struggling to raise two daughters (played by Mackenzie Phillips and Valerie Bertinelli).

“He turned out to be the comic strength of the show,” show co-creator Norman Lear once said.
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Sock It to Me: A Brief History of Rock & Roll Variety Shows

Sock It to Me: A Brief History of Rock & Roll Variety Shows
When Neil Patrick Harris returns to TV next week, he won't be cracking jokes in another sitcom. Best Time Ever With Neil Patrick Harris (debuting on September 15th on NBC) marks the return — overdue or not — of the variety show, that long-dormant format in which kooky skits, musical guests, and frenzied production numbers are jammed into an hour of family-friendly entertainment. "When you think of the variety shows we all grew upon — Sonny and Cher and Donny and Marie — those [programs] all said, 'Sit on the couch, be entertained with a little song,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Donna Douglas, Elly May Clampett on ‘Beverly Hillbillies,’ Dies at 81

Donna Douglas, Elly May Clampett on ‘Beverly Hillbillies,’ Dies at 81
Donna Douglas, who played the ditsy Elly May Clampett on “The Beverly Hillbillies,” died Friday at her home in Zachary, La., according to a report by CBS affiliate Wafb-tv in Baton Rouge, La. She was 81.

Douglas starred as the naive only daughter of the oil-rich Clampett clan in the CBS sitcom that ran from 1962 to 1971. Buddy Ebsen played patriarch Jed Clampett, who moves his family from the Ozarks to Beverly Hills after stumbling into oil riches.

Douglas’ Elly May was known for her love of all kinds of “critters,” as well as for her shapely figure, form-fitting jeans and cascade of blond curls. The actress was a series regular throughout the run of the top-rated show, which was the first in a triptych of corny countrified sitcoms from creator Paul Henning that included “Petticoat Junction” and “Green Acres.”

Elly May’s love of “critters” was inspired by Douglas’ real-life affection for animals,
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Donna Douglas, ‘Beverly Hillbillies’ Star, Dead at 81 (Report)

  • The Wrap
Donna Douglas, ‘Beverly Hillbillies’ Star, Dead at 81 (Report)
Donna Douglas, who played Elly May Clampett on the CBS sitcom “The Beverly Hillbillies,” died Friday, NBC affiliate Wafb reports. She was 81.

TMZ reports that Douglas died at her home in Louisiana, surrounded by friends and family.

Born Doris Smith in Louisiana in 1933, Douglas appeared on “The Steve Allen Show” and “The Perry Como Show” before rising to notoriety on “The Beverly Hillbillies,” the comedy about a rural family who moved to Beverly Hills after patriarch Jed Clampett (Buddy Ebsen) struck oil.

Douglas’ agent has not yet responded to TheWrap‘s request for comment.

See photos: Hollywood’s Notable Deaths of 2014

The series,
See full article at The Wrap »

Terry Kyne, Director of ‘Red Skelton Show,’ Dies at 83

Terry Kyne, a producer and director of television in Canada and the U.S., died of natural causes in Dana Point, Calif., on June 7. He was 83.

Kyne produced and directed Canada’s top-rated satirical comedy variety series, “Nightcap,” and more than 500 episodes of other CBC shows in a wide variety of genres — sitcom, variety, gameshow, talkshow, children’s and news.

In 1969 NBC brought Kyne to the U.S. to direct the “The Red Skelton Show.”

Some of his other credits include “The Steve Allen Show,” “The Mike Douglas Show,” “The John Davidson Show,” “Tony Orlando and Dawn,” “The Dr. Joyce Brothers Show,” “Getting in Touch,” “Totally Hidden Video,” “Name That Tune,” “The Wizard of Odds,” “The Cheap Show,” “The Diamond Head Game,” “Celebrity Sweepstakes” and “The Gong Show.”

Kyne is survived by his friend and wife, Pauline; two daughters and a son; three grandchildren; two brothers and a sister.
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Actor James Garner Dead at 86

©2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved

Oscar-nominated actor James Garner has passed away at the age of 86.

From AP:

Garner, whose whimsical style in the 1950s TV Western “Maverick” led to a stellar career in TV and films such as “The Rockford Files” and his Oscar-nominated “Murphy’s Romance,” was found dead of natural causes at his home in the Brentwood area of Los Angeles Saturday evening, Los Angeles police officer Alonzo Iniquez said early Sunday.

Police responded to a call around 8 p.m. Pdt and confirmed Garner’s identity from family members, Iniquez told The Associated Press.

There was no immediate word on a more specific cause of death. Garner had suffered a stroke in May 2008, just weeks after his 80th birthday.

Although he was adept at drama and action, Garner was best known for his low-key, wisecracking style, especially with his hit TV series, “Maverick” and “The Rockford Files.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Paul Mazursky, Oscar-Nominated Filmmaker, Dies At 84

Paul Mazursky, the five-time Academy Award-nominated writer and director, died Monday. He was 84.

Paul Mazursky Dies

Mazursky died as a result of a pulmonary cardiac arrest, a family spokesperson told Entertainment Weekly.

In the 1950s and early 60s, Mazursky broke into Hollywood as a TV actor in The Kaiser Aluminum Hour, The Steve Allen Plymouth Show, The Untouchables, Twilight Zone, The Real McCoys and more. He also made appearances on the silver screen in Blackboard Jungle and Stanley Kubrick’s Fear and Desire.

Among Mazursky’s first screenwriting credits were for The Monkees and The Danny Kaye Show. He went on to pen I Love You, Alice B. Toklas! and Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice, for which he earned his first credit as a director and first Oscar nod.

Mazursky went on to receive Oscar nominations for Harry and Tonto (1974), An Unmarried Woman (1978) and Enemies: A Love Story (1990).

In later years,
See full article at Uinterview »

Whoops…Did I Do That?: Top 10 Film Bumblers and Stumblers

  • SoundOnSight
The world of cinema certainly has had its share of sympathetic bumbling and stumbling characters rich in both comedic and tragic layers and anything else in between. Some of these movie misfits are misunderstood and actually more aware then they appear. The combination of being slow-witted, clumsy, awkward, inept, unstable–it all has its entertaining points in the hapless scheme of things. Importantly, these bumbling and stumbling film figureheads generate a kind of loose-minded and in some cases underlying poignancy that resonates so soundly for global moviegoers to observe with embraced enthusiasm.

So let us take a look at a selection of klutzy candidates (both in seriousness and silliness) that inspire us to chuckle and root for in the column Whoops…Did I Do That?: Top 10 Film Bumblers and Stumblers (Note: the listing of the choices below are not in any particular order of preference):

1.) Forrest Gump from
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Let’s Get Lost | DVD Review

Originally released in 1989 – at which time the dirt on the West Coast “cool” jazz trumpeter, Chet Baker’s (born Chesney Henry Baker Jr.) grave was still relatively fresh (Baker died in Amsterdam in May 1988) – Bruce Weber’s documentary goes to exasperating lengths to legitimize the legend of Baker’s natural musical talent and iconically hip ba-da-be-bop coolness. Let’s Get Lost also chooses to focus on Baker's soft and subtle singing voice that is awkwardly affected by a slurring lisp and tendency to slide ever-so-slightly off-key. In comparison to the maestria of his pitch-perfect trumpeting, it is compelling to me that so many people (including Weber) consider Baker’s vocal performances as equally important as his trumpeting. By no means a traditional biography, Weber creates a visual poem set to a soundtrack of Baker’s tunes. Weber’s highly artistic and severely contrasted black and white footage (skillfully lensed by
See full article at SmellsLikeScreenSpirit »

Comedian Jonathan Winters Dead at 87

Comedian Jonathan Winters Dead at 87
Jonathan Winters, once described by “Tonight Show” host Jack Paar as “pound for pound, the funniest man alive” and a comedian whose freeform work with multiple voices and personalities presaged the antics of comics such as Robin Williams, died of natural causes Thursday in Montecito, Calif. at 87.

A pioneer of improvisational standup comedy, with an exceptional gift for mimicry, a grab bag of eccentric personalities and a bottomless reservoir of creative energy, he was introduced to millions of new fans in 1981 as the son of Williams’ goofball alien and his earthling wife in the final season of ABC’s “Mork and Mindy.” He appeared in numerous films including “It’s a Mad Mad Mad Mad World” and did extensive voice work on toons including “The Smurfs.”

Born Jonathan Harshman Winters III in Dayton, Ohio, Winters was raised mostly by his divorced mother, a radio personality in Springfield, Ohio, and showed an early gift for mimicry.
See full article at Variety - TV News »

R.I.P. Patti Page

  • Deadline TV
R.I.P. Patti Page
Patti Page, the legendary pop singer whose musical success spawned several television series of her own in the 1950s, has died. Page passed away on New Year’s Day in Encinitas, CA, at age 85. She had more than 100 chart hits during her decades-long career, including such pop classics as “(How Much Is That) Doggie In The Window”, “Old Cape Cod” and “Tennessee Waltz”. She was a regular on several music and variety shows during television’s Golden Age, including The Ed Sullivan Show and The Steve Allen Show. Those led to a Patti Page special on ABC, and later to consecutive series of her own on all three major networks; she was nominated for an Emmy in 1959 for ABC’s Patti Page Show. She also starred in Scott Music Hall Presents Patti Page, a summer replacement series on NBC that gave birth to the twice-weekly syndicated Oldsmobile Presents — Patti Page.
See full article at Deadline TV »

Steve Davis, Elvis Impersonator, at Super-8 Elvis Movie Madness Tomorrow Night

Steve Davis is the artist behind Memories of Elvis., a show he’s been performing in the St. Louis area for decades. Steve has dedicated over 20 years to perfecting the Elvis experience by paying incredible attention to detail and now he’ll be bringing that experience to Super-8 Elvis Movie Madness Tomorrow Night! This is a last-minute addition to the program which consists of condensed (average length: 15 minutes) versions of several of Elvis.s greatest films on Super-8 sound film projected on a big screen. Here.s the Elvis line-up: Blue Hawaii, Tickle Me, Roustabout, Girls Girls Girls, an Elvis Blooper Reel, and episode of The Steve Allen Show featuring guests Elvis Presley and Andy Griffith (who perform together!), and the 1978 biopic Elvis The Movie directed by John Carpenter and starring Kurt Russell as Elvis. . Steve Davis will take the stage during the break and perform some acoustic Elvis tunes.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Elvis, The Movie – The DVD Review

There have been many TV bios of Elvis Presley but Elvis, The Movie, the once-elusive 1979 feature starring Kurt Russell, was the first and is still the best. When Elvis died August 16 1978 at age 42, it sent shock waves around the world, comparable to the deaths of Princess Diana or Michael Jackson in later decades. A carnival atmosphere developed in Memphis as thousands of mourners gathered around the gates of Graceland and sales of Elvis. music skyrocketed. The 3-hour epic Elvis The Movie, produced by Dick Clark for the ABC network premiered 18 months later on February 11 1979 and, despite CBS airing Gone With The Wind the same night, was one of the highest rated made-for-television movies ever shown (it played theatrically on other parts of the world . in Japan it was called The Singer!). The script by Antony Lawrence, who had penned two Elvis movies earlier in his career (Paradise Hawaiin Style and
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »
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