"Playhouse 90"
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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006 | 2004

9 items from 2015


Pitt Former TV Co-Star Kallsen Dead at 48, Emmy Nominee Meadows dead at 95, Oscar nominee Mankiewicz dead at 93

30 April 2015 9:25 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Brad Pitt 'Glory Days' costar Nicholas Kallsen Brad Pitt 'Glory Days' costar Nicholas Kallsen dead at 48 Nicholas Kallsen, who was featured opposite Brad Pitt in the short-lived television series Glory Days, has died at age 48 in Thailand according to online reports. Their source is one of Rupert Murdoch's rags, citing a Facebook posting by one of the actor's friends. The cause of death was purportedly – no specific source was provided – a drug overdose.* Aired on Fox in July 1990, Glory Days told the story of four high-school friends whose paths take different directions after graduation. Besides Nicholas Kallsen and Brad Pitt, the show also featured Spike Alexander and Evan Mirand. Glory Days lasted a mere six episodes – two of which directed by former Happy Days actor Anson Williams – before its cancellation. Roommates Nicholas Kallsen and Brad Pitt vying for same 'Thelma & Louise' role? The Murdoch tabloid also »

- Andre Soares

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Betsy von Furstenberg, Actress and Aristocrat, Dies at 83

30 April 2015 4:29 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Betsy von Furstenberg, an elegant star of Broadway during the 1950s who also made appearances in early television and on daytime soaps, died April 21 from complications of Alzheimer’s disease in Manhattan. She was 83.

The stylish actress played a series of debutantes and society girls onstage. She made a big impression playing Myra Hagerman in Edward Chodorov’s original comedy “Oh, Men! Oh, Women!” on Broadway in 1953. (Barbara Rush played the role in the 1957 feature adaptation). During the decade she enjoyed success on the Rialto in plays including “The Chalk Garden,” “Child of Fortune,” “Nature’s Way” and a revival of “Much Ado About Nothing,”

She made her screen debut in director Géza von Radványi’s 1950 Italian war drama “Women Without Names.” During the 1950s she appeared in a number of episodic anthology shows beginning with “Starlight Theatre” in 1951 and also including “Playhouse 90,” “Pulitzer Prize Theatre,” “Armstrong Circle Theatre” and “Kraft Theatre. »

- Carmel Dagan

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Don Mankiewicz Dies at 93; Screenwriter Wrote ‘I Want to Live!,’ ‘Star Trek’ Episode

27 April 2015 11:55 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Don Mankiewicz, a member of a family of Hollywood royalty who earned an Oscar nomination for the screenplay to Susan Hayward starrer “I Want to Live!” and also worked in television, died Saturday of congestive heart failure at his home in Monrovia, Calif. He was 93.

Mankiewicz penned the pilot episodes of both ABC medical drama “Marcus Welby, M.D.,” which starred Robert Young and and James Brolin and ran 1969-76, and NBC cop drama “Ironside,” which starred Raymond Burr as a wheelchair-bound police detective on special assignment in San Francisco and ran 1967–75.

Don Mankiewicz was a son of Herman J. Mankiewicz, who won the screenplay Oscar for “Citizen Kane” together with with Orson Welles, and a nephew of Joseph L. Mankiewicz, who won Oscars for writing and directing best picture winner “All About Eve” (1950).

Don’s brother, Frank Mankiewicz, who served as an aide to Democratic presidential candidates Robert F. Kennedy and George McGovern, »

- Variety Staff

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Don Mankiewicz Dies at 93; Screenwriter Wrote ‘I Want to Live!,’ ‘Star Trek’ Episode

27 April 2015 11:55 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Don Mankiewicz, a member of a family of Hollywood royalty who earned an Oscar nomination for the screenplay to Susan Hayward starrer “I Want to Live!” and also worked in television, died Saturday of congestive heart failure at his home in Monrovia, Calif. He was 93.

Mankiewicz penned the pilot episodes of both ABC medical drama “Marcus Welby, M.D.,” which starred Robert Young and and James Brolin and ran 1969-76, and NBC cop drama “Ironside,” which starred Raymond Burr as a wheelchair-bound police detective on special assignment in San Francisco and ran 1967–75.

Don Mankiewicz was a son of Herman J. Mankiewicz, who won the screenplay Oscar for “Citizen Kane” together with with Orson Welles, and a nephew of Joseph L. Mankiewicz, who won Oscars for writing and directing best picture winner “All About Eve” (1950).

Don’s brother, Frank Mankiewicz, who served as an aide to Democratic presidential candidates Robert F. Kennedy and George McGovern, »

- Variety Staff

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Wright Was Earliest Surviving Best Supporting Actress Oscar Winner

15 March 2015 12:05 AM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Teresa Wright: Later years (See preceding post: "Teresa Wright: From Marlon Brando to Matt Damon.") Teresa Wright and Robert Anderson were divorced in 1978. They would remain friends in the ensuing years.[1] Wright spent most of the last decade of her life in Connecticut, making only sporadic public appearances. In 1998, she could be seen with her grandson, film producer Jonah Smith, at New York's Yankee Stadium, where she threw the ceremonial first pitch.[2] Wright also became involved in the Greater New York chapter of the Als Association. (The Pride of the Yankees subject, Lou Gehrig, died of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis in 1941.) The week she turned 82 in October 2000, Wright attended the 20th anniversary celebration of Somewhere in Time, where she posed for pictures with Christopher Reeve and Jane Seymour. In March 2003, she was a guest at the 75th Academy Awards, in the segment showcasing Oscar-winning actors of the past. Two years later, »

- Andre Soares

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Oscar Winner Went All the Way from Wyler to Coppola in Film Career Spanning Half a Century

11 March 2015 2:18 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Teresa Wright and Matt Damon in 'The Rainmaker' Teresa Wright: From Marlon Brando to Matt Damon (See preceding post: "Teresa Wright vs. Samuel Goldwyn: Nasty Falling Out.") "I'd rather have luck than brains!" Teresa Wright was quoted as saying in the early 1950s. That's understandable, considering her post-Samuel Goldwyn choice of movie roles, some of which may have seemed promising on paper.[1] Wright was Marlon Brando's first Hollywood leading lady, but that didn't help her to bounce back following the very public spat with her former boss. After all, The Men was released before Elia Kazan's film version of A Streetcar Named Desire turned Brando into a major international star. Chances are that good film offers were scarce. After Wright's brief 1950 comeback, for the third time in less than a decade she would be gone from the big screen for more than a year. »

- Andre Soares

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Stewart Stern, Writer of ‘Rebel Without a Cause,’ Dies at 92

6 February 2015 3:13 PM, PST | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Twice Oscar-nominated screenwriter and Emmy-winning television writer Stewart Stern, who wrote film classic “Rebel Without a Cause,” Dennis Hopper’s “The Last Movie” and seminal telepic “Sybil,” starring Sally Field, died February 2 at the Swedish Hospital in Seattle, after battling cancer. He was 92.

Stern’s credits included the iconic 1955 James Dean teen rebellion drama “Rebel Without a Cause (screenplay by Stern, adaptation by Irving Shulman, story by Nicholas Ray), as well as a documentary feature on the late actor, “The James Dean Story” (1957), co-directed by Robert Altman; 1971’s notorious counterculture indie drama “The Last Movie,” co-written and directed by Hopper (written by Stern, story by Hopper and Stern); 1963’s The Ugly American,” starring Marlon Brando (screenplay & screen story by Stern, from the novel by William J. Lederer and Eugene Burdick), which earned Stern a Writers Guild Award nomination for best written American drama; and the Paul Newman-directed 1968 film “Rachel, »

- Variety Staff

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Stewart Stern, Writer of ‘Rebel Without a Cause,’ Dies at 92

6 February 2015 3:13 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Twice Oscar-nominated screenwriter and Emmy-winning television writer Stewart Stern, who wrote film classic “Rebel Without a Cause,” Dennis Hopper’s “The Last Movie” and seminal telepic “Sybil,” starring Sally Field, died February 2 at the Swedish Hospital in Seattle, after battling cancer. He was 92.

Stern’s credits included the iconic 1955 James Dean teen rebellion drama “Rebel Without a Cause (screenplay by Stern, adaptation by Irving Shulman, story by Nicholas Ray), as well as a documentary feature on the late actor, “The James Dean Story” (1957), co-directed by Robert Altman; 1971’s notorious counterculture indie drama “The Last Movie,” co-written and directed by Hopper (written by Stern, story by Hopper and Stern); 1963’s The Ugly American,” starring Marlon Brando (screenplay & screen story by Stern, from the novel by William J. Lederer and Eugene Burdick), which earned Stern a Writers Guild Award nomination for best written American drama; and the Paul Newman-directed 1968 film “Rachel, »

- Variety Staff

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Shirley Jones on ‘Oklahoma,’ ‘Elmer Gantry’ and Guys Named Oscar

30 January 2015 10:00 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Variety called it a “Cinderella” story: Teenager with the voice of an angel meets famous producers, and a star is born. Shirley Jones would go on to become a music maven, a leading lady — and an Oscar winner.

How did you meet Rodgers and Hammerstein?

I was very young; I had just graduated high school and was on my way to become a veterinarian. Animals were the light of my life. But I was born singing — it was a gift. I had studied some acting and dancing at the Pittsburgh Playhouse during the summer. So I went to an audition in New York with my parents on vacation. A pianist I’d worked with at the playhouse told me a casting director for Rodgers and Hammerstein was having open auditions. I didn’t even know who Rodgers and Hammerstein were — I was that green.

I take it the audition went well. »

- Debra Birnbaum

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006 | 2004

9 items from 2015


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