"Playhouse 90"
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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006 | 2004

6 items from 2017


Big-Screen Directors Relish Small-Screen Opportunities

14 June 2017 10:15 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

There’s a new rejoinder in Hollywood: “But what I really want to do is direct television.”

Established directors with nothing left to prove on the feature side have been flocking to the smaller screen at an accelerating pace, a migration reflected in the crowded Emmy race for director. Everyone from up-and-coming indie specialists to venerable A-listers is benefiting from the influx of billions of dollars into original content production, especially on commercial-free and notes-averse streaming services. Freed to execute their visions in six or more hours instead of squeezing them into just two, they are gleefully hopping over what for decades used to be a virtually impermeable wall between feature film and episodic television.

“I really like what’s going on,” says Jean-Marc Vallée, who has segued from such films as “Wild” and “Dallas Buyers Club” to making his TV debuts on HBO series including “Big Little Lies” and the forthcoming “Sharp Objects.” “It »

- Dade Hayes

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Dina Merrill, Elegant Actress and Philanthropist, Dies at 93

22 May 2017 9:48 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Dina Merrill, a beautiful, blonde actress with an aristocratic bearing known as much for her wealthy origins, philanthropy, and marriage to actor Cliff Robertson as for her work in film and television, died on Monday at her home in East Hampton, N.Y. She was 93.

Her son, Stanley H. Rumbough, told the New York Times that Merrill had Lewy Body dementia.

Her parents were Post Cereals heiress Marjorie Merriweather Post, and her second husband, Wall Street’s E.F. Hutton.

In 1983, on the occasion of Merrill’s musical comedy debut in a revival of Rodgers and Hart’s 1936 musical ”On Your Toes,” the New York Times gushed, “Long regarded as the essence of chic, the epitome of class and such a persuasive purveyor of charm and charity that she could have a rightful claim to fame as an eloquent spokesman — and fund-raiser — for a slew of worthy causes, Miss Merrill »

- Carmel Dagan

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Dina Merrill, Elegant Actress and Philanthropist, Dies at 93

22 May 2017 9:48 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Dina Merrill, a beautiful, blonde actress with an aristocratic bearing known as much for her wealthy origins, philanthropy, and marriage to actor Cliff Robertson as for her work in film and television, died on Monday at her home in East Hampton, N.Y. She was 93.

Her son, Stanley H. Rumbough, told the New York Times that Merrill had Lewy Body dementia.

Her parents were Post Cereals heiress Marjorie Merriweather Post, and her second husband, Wall Street’s E.F. Hutton.

In 1983, on the occasion of Merrill’s musical comedy debut in a revival of Rodgers and Hart’s 1936 musical ”On Your Toes,” the New York Times gushed, “Long regarded as the essence of chic, the epitome of class and such a persuasive purveyor of charm and charity that she could have a rightful claim to fame as an eloquent spokesman — and fund-raiser — for a slew of worthy causes, Miss Merrill has evoked instant recognition and elegant associations »

- Carmel Dagan

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Peabody Awards Keep Pace With Changing Times

19 May 2017 1:44 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

At an age, 76, when many awards shows and institutions seem to struggle with diversity issues and to keep abreast of rapidly changing times, the Peabody Awards seem to be more relevant and resilient than ever. And while there may still be a lingering perception that the awards largely salute dry, public-affairs programming, this is far from the reality.

“Just look at the entertainment winners this year,” says Jeffrey P. Jones, director of the George Foster Peabody Awards at the University of Georgia. “You have Donald Glover’s ‘Atlanta’ series and Beyonce’s ‘Lemonade,’ and those are more than just representations of African-American stories, as they have resonance beyond that community into the broad public. And then we have ‘Horace and Pete,’ where Louis C.K. really stepped out on a limb to self-finance a show that really harkens back to the Playhouse 90 era. All these are cutting-edge projects, and there »

- Iain Blair

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Peabody Awards Keep Pace With Changing Times

19 May 2017 1:44 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

At an age, 76, when many awards shows and institutions seem to struggle with diversity issues and to keep abreast of rapidly changing times, the Peabody Awards seem to be more relevant and resilient than ever. And while there may still be a lingering perception that the awards largely salute dry, public-affairs programming, this is far from the reality.

“Just look at the entertainment winners this year,” says Jeffrey P. Jones, director of the George Foster Peabody Awards at the University of Georgia. “You have Donald Glover’s ‘Atlanta’ series and Beyonce’s ‘Lemonade,’ and those are more than just representations of African-American stories, as they have resonance beyond that community into the broad public. And then we have ‘Horace and Pete,’ where Louis C.K. really stepped out on a limb to self-finance a show that really harkens back to the Playhouse 90 era. All these are cutting-edge projects, and there’s nothing dry or safe about any »

- Iain Blair

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Scott’s TCM Fest Dispatch, Part Two: Economics

12 April 2017 9:22 AM, PDT | CriterionCast | See recent CriterionCast news »

The 1930s – more films about women, more films about working life. And often the two overlapped. You watch a film made today, it’s brutally clear that the people who made it rarely have to be anywhere In the ‘30s, at the height of the studio system, the entire creative force behind a picture worked 9-5 on the studio lot, just like anyone else. They had a workplace. And while many made a great deal more money than the characters they were depicting, they knew what it was to hold a job. That mindset, that constant awareness of money and office work and routine, bleeds into the pictures of the period.

Take a film like Rafter Romance, which played at TCM Classic Film Festival Friday morning. Ginger Rogers and Norman Foster star as two broke strangers living in the same apartment building (and they say people knew their neighbors back »

- Scott Nye

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006 | 2004

6 items from 2017


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