"Playhouse 90"
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany creditsepisode listepisodes castepisode ratings... by rating... by votes
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsmessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summaryplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Connect with IMDb



2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006 | 2004

1-20 of 27 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


Desperate Housewives Emmy-Nominated Actress Lost Her Fortune Following Stock-Market Crash

22 September 2014 5:15 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Polly Bergen: 'Desperate Housewives' Emmy nominee; winner for 'The Helen Morgan Story' (photo: Felicity Huffman, Doug Savant, and Polly Bergen in 'Desperate Housewives') (See previous article: "Polly Bergen: Actress on Richard Nixon 'Enemies List'.") Polly Bergen began her lengthy — and to some extent prestigious — television career in 1950, making sporadic appearances in anthology series. She won an Emmy for Best Actress in a Single Performance – Lead or Supporting — beating Julie Andrews, Helen Hayes, Teresa Wright, and Piper Laurie — for playing troubled torch singer Helen Morgan (Show Boat) in the 1957 Playhouse 90 episode "The Helen Morgan Story," featuring veteran Sylvia Sidney as Morgan's mother. Curiously, Bergen's retelling of Helen Morgan's story was broadcast the same year that Ann Blyth starred in Michael Curtiz's Morgan biopic. Also titled The Helen Morgan Story, the film focused on the relationship between the singer and a »

- Andre Soares

Permalink | Report a problem


Sopranos Actress Bergen, the Movies' '1st Female President' of the United States, Dead at 84

20 September 2014 1:51 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Polly Bergen dead at 84: ‘First woman president of the U.S.A.,’ former mistress of Tony Soprano’s father Emmy Award-winning actress Polly Bergen — whose roles ranged from the first U.S.A. woman president in Kisses for My President to the former mistress of both Tony Soprano’s father and John F. Kennedy in the television hit series The Sopranos — died from "natural causes" on September 20, 2014, at her home in Southbury, Connecticut. The 84-year-old Bergen, a heavy smoker for five decades, had been suffering from emphysema and other ailments since the 1990s. "Most people think I was born in a rich Long Island family," she told The Washington Post in 1988, but Polly Bergen was actually born Nellie Paulina Burgin on July 14, 1930, to an impoverished family in Knoxville, Tennessee. Her father was an illiterate construction worker while her mother got only as far as the third grade. The family »

- Andre Soares

Permalink | Report a problem


Polly Bergen, ‘Cape Fear’ Actress, Dies at 84

20 September 2014 1:46 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Actress and singer Polly Bergen, who’s best known for her role in the original “Cape Fear” opposite Gregory Peck, died at her home in Connecticut on Saturday. She was 84.

Bergen had battled emphysema in the late 1990s.

“It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of legendary actress and long-time friend and client, Polly Bergen,” her publicist Judy Katz said in a statement. “She died peacefully at her home in Southbury, Conn. this morning at 11:10 a.m., surrounded by her family, long-time personal manager, Jan McCormack and close friends.”

Aside from a thriving acting career on film, TV and Broadway, she was also a prolific songstress, self-help author and businesswoman, having launched a successful cosmetics line that earned her millions.

Bergen won an Emmy in 1958 for her role as Helen Morgan on the 1950s anthology series “Playhouse 90.” She was a regular in TV movies and miniseries in the 1980s, »

- Maane Khatchatourian

Permalink | Report a problem


Polly Bergen, ‘Cape Fear’ Actress, Dies at 84

20 September 2014 1:46 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Actress and singer Polly Bergen, who’s best known for her role in the original “Cape Fear” opposite Gregory Peck, died at her home in Connecticut on Saturday. She was 84.

Bergen had battled emphysema in the late 1990s.

“It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of legendary actress and long-time friend and client, Polly Bergen,” her publicist Judy Katz said in a statement. “She died peacefully at her home in Southbury, Conn. this morning at 11:10 a.m., surrounded by her family, long-time personal manager, Jan McCormack and close friends.”

Aside from a thriving acting career on film, TV and Broadway, she was also a prolific songstress, self-help author and businesswoman, having launched a successful cosmetics line that earned her millions.

Bergen won an Emmy in 1958 for her role as Helen Morgan on the 1950s anthology series “Playhouse 90.” She was a regular in TV movies and miniseries in the 1980s, »

- Maane Khatchatourian

Permalink | Report a problem


Cape Fear, Sopranos Actress Polly Bergen Has Died at 84

20 September 2014 1:05 PM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Emmy-winning actress and singer Polly Bergen, who in a long career played the terrorized wife in the original Cape Fear and the first woman president in Kisses for My President, died Saturday, according to her publicist. She was 84. Bergen died at her home in Southbury, Connecticut, from natural causes, said publicist Judy Katz, surrounded by family and close friends. A brunette beauty with a warm, sultry singing voice, Bergen was a household name from her 20s onward. She made albums and played leading roles in films, stage musicals and TV dramas. She also hosted her own variety series, was a popular game show panelist, »

- Associated Press

Permalink | Report a problem


Cape Fear Actress Polly Bergen Has Died at 84

20 September 2014 1:05 PM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Emmy-winning actress and singer Polly Bergen, who in a long career played the terrorized wife in the original Cape Fear and the first woman president in Kisses for My President, died Saturday, according to her publicist. She was 84. Bergen died at her home in Southbury, Connecticut, from natural causes, said publicist Judy Katz, surrounded by family and close friends. A brunette beauty with a warm, sultry singing voice, Bergen was a household name from her 20s onward. She made albums and played leading roles in films, stage musicals and TV dramas. She also hosted her own variety series, was a popular game show panelist, »

- Associated Press

Permalink | Report a problem


Screenwriter Walter Bernstein at 95: Still Front and Center

26 August 2014 2:01 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Ask Walter Bernstein what makes for a good screenplay, and he’ll answer you with a (possibly apocryphal) story about Henry David Thoreau. “He was living out at Walden Pond and a friend came to tell him that Samuel Morse had just made the first successful wireless telegraph transmission from Boston to Portland, or something like that,” Bernstein says with the practiced storyteller’s delight in a well-told tale. “And Thoreau asked, ‘But what did it say?’ That’s always stuck with me. With all the technology and everything else, what’s it about?”

“What’s it about?” is a question Bernstein, who turned 95 this month, has been asking himself in one form or another for most of his 65-year career, which has stretched from the early days of live television to the modern era of binge watching, and from the lionized “golden age” of the studio system to the low-budget indie renaissance. »

- Scott Foundas

Permalink | Report a problem


Brian G. Hutton, Director of ‘Where Eagles Dare,’ ‘Kelly’s Heroes,’ Dies at 79

20 August 2014 1:16 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Brian G. Hutton, who directed Clint Eastwood in the WWII actioners “Where Eagles Dare” (1968) and “Kelly’s Heroes” (1970) and also directed Elizabeth Taylor in two films, has died. He was 79.

Where Eagles Dare,” a thriller based on the Alistair MacLean novel, also starred Richard Burton, while “Kelly Heroes,” a heist film masquerading as a war film, sported a large ensemble cast that included Telly Savalas, Don Rickles, Carroll O’Connor and Donald Sutherland.

Hutton’s 1972 drama “X, Y and Zee” starred Elizabeth Taylor, Michael Caine and Susannah York concerned an an architect, his mistress, and the wife intent on breaking them at all costs. Follow-up film “Night Watch,” starring Taylor and Laurence Harvey, was a thriller.

Hutton did not direct again until 1980’s Lawrence Sanders adaptation “The First Deadly Sin,” starring Frank Sinatra as a New York police detective and Faye Dunaway his dying wife.

His final directorial effort was »

- Carmel Dagan

Permalink | Report a problem


Brian G. Hutton, Director of ‘Where Eagles Dare,’ ‘Kelly’s Heroes,’ Dies at 79

20 August 2014 1:16 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Brian G. Hutton, who directed Clint Eastwood in the WWII actioners “Where Eagles Dare” (1968) and “Kelly’s Heroes” (1970) and also directed Elizabeth Taylor in two films, has died. He was 79.

Where Eagles Dare,” a thriller based on the Alistair MacLean novel, also starred Richard Burton, while “Kelly Heroes,” a heist film masquerading as a war film, sported a large ensemble cast that included Telly Savalas, Don Rickles, Carroll O’Connor and Donald Sutherland.

Hutton’s 1972 drama “X, Y and Zee” starred Elizabeth Taylor, Michael Caine and Susannah York concerned an an architect, his mistress, and the wife intent on breaking them at all costs. Follow-up film “Night Watch,” starring Taylor and Laurence Harvey, was a thriller.

Hutton did not direct again until 1980’s Lawrence Sanders adaptation “The First Deadly Sin,” starring Frank Sinatra as a New York police detective and Faye Dunaway his dying wife.

His final directorial effort was »

- Carmel Dagan

Permalink | Report a problem


Disney Classics Getting Blu-Ray Release August 12th – Tarzan, Hercules, And More

6 August 2014 2:18 PM, PDT | AreYouScreening.com | See recent AreYouScreening news »

A slew of classic Disney movies are hitting for the first time on Blu-Ray, including one double-pack release, and you’re going to want to make sure to pick these up. You haven’t paid attention to some of these titles for a while, and it’s about time you got the chance to catch them on Blu-Ray. The best part is that there’s a great mix of releases hitting. Bedknobs and Broomsticks is all but lost in the cultural consciousness, and it deserves a return. The Academy Award-winning movie from the year I was born is filled with a lot of fun and adventure, and like most Disney films, holds up well for a whole new generation.

The rest of the group covers a great spectrum, including two animated “big” titles, and a 10th Anniversary release. There’s a lot to expose your family to here, so check out all the info below, »

- Marc Eastman

Permalink | Report a problem


Eli Wallach dies at 98

24 June 2014 11:09 PM, PDT | EW - Inside Movies | See recent EW.com - Inside Movies news »

Eli Wallach, the actor best known for his roles in The Good, The Bad and The Ugly and The Godfather franchise, has died. He was 98.

Wallach’s daughter Katherine confirmed his death to the New York Times. 

The New York City-born actor appeared in scores of films over his 60-plus year career alongside the likes of Clark Gable (The Misfits), Omar Sharif (Ghenghis Khan), Dean Martin (How to Save a Marriage and Ruin Your Life), Yul Brunner (The Magnificent Seven) and Robert Shaw (The Deep).

Wallach’s storied run in Hollywood also extended into TV, where he had roles in Playhouse 90, »

- Lynette Rice

Permalink | Report a problem


Actress Martha Hyer, Oscar Nominated for ‘Some Came Running,’ Dies at 89

11 June 2014 2:26 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Actress Martha Hyer, who drew an Oscar nomination for her role in 1959 for her role in Vincente Minnelli’s film “Some Came Running,” died May 31 in Santa Fe, New Mexico. She was 89.

In “Some Came Running,” based on a novel by James Jones, author of “Here to Eternity,” the very beautiful Hyer was in the enviable position of playing a character, schoolteacher Gwen French, adored by Frank Sinatra’s character, writer Dave Hirsh, though she did not return the feelings.

The actress (pictured above with actor Peter van Eyck) also had roles in films including “So Big,” “Sabrina,” Jerry Lewis comedy “The Delicate Delinquent,” Francis the Talking Mule entry “Francis in the Navy,” “Houseboat,” sudsy pic “The Carpetbaggers” and Western “The Sons of Katie Elder,” after debuting on the bigscreen with an uncredited role in 1946 film noir “The Locket.” Like many if not most actors, Hyer transitioned into TV roles in the 1950s, »

- Carmel Dagan

Permalink | Report a problem


Actress Martha Hyer, Oscar Nominated for ‘Some Came Running,’ Dies at 89

11 June 2014 2:26 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Actress Martha Hyer, who drew an Oscar nomination for her role in 1959 for her role in Vincente Minnelli’s film “Some Came Running,” died May 31 in Santa Fe, New Mexico. She was 89.

In “Some Came Running,” based on a novel by James Jones, author of “Here to Eternity,” the very beautiful Hyer was in the enviable position of playing a character, schoolteacher Gwen French, adored by Frank Sinatra’s character, writer Dave Hirsh, though she did not return the feelings.

The actress (pictured above with actor Peter van Eyck) also had roles in films including “So Big,” “Sabrina,” Jerry Lewis comedy “The Delicate Delinquent,” Francis the Talking Mule entry “Francis in the Navy,” “Houseboat,” sudsy pic “The Carpetbaggers” and Western “The Sons of Katie Elder,” after debuting on the bigscreen with an uncredited role in 1946 film noir “The Locket.” Like many if not most actors, Hyer transitioned into TV roles in the 1950s, »

- Carmel Dagan

Permalink | Report a problem


Trailers from Hell Counts 'Seven Days in May'

30 May 2014 9:38 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Today on Trailers from Hell, Michael Peyser takes a peek at this politically charged film from 1964, starring Burt Lancaster. President John F. Kennedy was a fan of the best selling novel and provided enthusiastic, if clandestine, support for Rod Serling's scripted movie version, allowing unusual access to shooting outside the White House. General Edwin Walker,who clashed with Kennedy over the Cuban Missile Crisis, was the prototype for Burt Lancaster’s warmongering general character who engineers a military coup against embattled president Fredric March. Director John Frankenheimer's live TV background provides plenty of Playhouse 90 immediacy and the supporting cast is unparalleled. »

- Trailers From Hell

Permalink | Report a problem


Seven Days In May

29 May 2014 10:00 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

President John F. Kennedy was a fan of the best selling novel and provided enthusiastic, if clandestine, support for Rod Serling's scripted movie version, allowing unusual access to shooting outside the White House. General Edwin Walker,who clashed with Kennedy over the Cuban Missile Crisis, was the prototype for Burt Lancaster's warmongering general character who engineers a military coup against embattled president Fredric March. Director John Frankenheimer's live tv background provides plenty of Playhouse 90 immediacy and the supporting cast is unparalleled.

The post Seven Days In May appeared first on Trailers From Hell.

»

- TFH Team

Permalink | Report a problem


Beyond The Zone: An Exclusive Interview with Anne Serling

8 May 2014 11:45 AM, PDT | FamousMonsters of Filmland | See recent Famous Monsters of Filmland news »

Interview and photo by Michael Lizarraga.

Whether we were on Mars, in a time machine, wandering a realm, or raising the dead, Rod Serling‘s (The Twilight Zone) messages on morals and social justice maneuvered their way into our homes, our hearts, our minds, and our conscience via the vessels of sci-fi and fantasy. Yet more admirable than Serling’s artistry and convictions was his love for his family, extolling the very same warmth and compassion that many of us felt from his stories and films onto his wife and children. And for his youngest daughter, Anne Serling, a unique father/daughter bond was forged between them, as timeless as infinity.

Endowed with both her father’s passion for writing and social concerns, Anne Serling is an accomplished poet, novelist, short story writer, and author of As I Knew Him, an honest and personal biographical memoir of her mentor, “best buddy”, and dad, »

- Holly Interlandi

Permalink | Report a problem


After Rooney's Death, Who Is Earliest Surviving Best Actor Academy Award Nominee?

8 April 2014 6:17 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Mickey Rooney was earliest surviving Best Actor Oscar nominee (photo: Mickey Rooney and Spencer Tracy in ‘Boys Town’) (See previous post: “Mickey Rooney Dead at 93: MGM’s Andy Hardy Series’ Hero and Judy Garland Frequent Co-Star Had Longest Film Career Ever?”) Mickey Rooney was the earliest surviving Best Actor Academy Award nominee — Babes in Arms, 1939; The Human Comedy, 1943 — and the last surviving male acting Oscar nominee of the 1930s. Rooney lost the Best Actor Oscar to two considerably more “prestigious” — albeit less popular — stars: Robert Donat for Sam Wood’s Goodbye, Mr. Chips (1939) and Paul Lukas for Herman Shumlin’s Watch on the Rhine (1943). Following Mickey Rooney’s death, there are only two acting Academy Award nominees from the ’30s still alive: two-time Best Actress winner Luise Rainer, 104 (for Robert Z. Leonard’s The Great Ziegfeld, 1936, and Sidney Franklin’s The Good Earth, 1937), and Best Supporting Actress nominee Olivia de Havilland, »

- Andre Soares

Permalink | Report a problem


Mickey Rooney Appreciation: Noir Films Showed He Was More Than a Teen Star

8 April 2014 7:55 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

From 1937 to 1946, Mickey Rooney played clean-cut, wide-eyed Midwestern teenager Andy Hardy 15 times in a series of films that proved instrumental (along with his Judy Garland musicals) in making him one of the most popular movie stars of his era. They also surely came to feel like a gilded prison around the actor. By the time the series ended, the Hardy character had been to WWII and back (as had Rooney), yet still seemed incapable of getting past first base with a girl (whereas Rooney was already on the second of his eight marriages).

The Mickster’s thirst for more adult roles was palpable, and Hollywood took a few different stabs at figuring out what to do with him. There was a series of sports films designed to show off the five-foot-two actor’s virile, athletic side: the boxing drama “Killer McCoy” (1947), in which he is a highly improbable light heavyweight »

- Scott Foundas

Permalink | Report a problem


Movie News: Classic Movie Star Mickey Rooney Dies at 93

7 April 2014 8:47 AM, PDT | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Hollywood – He was the biggest star the world, the box office champion from 1939 to 1941. “Wow, spanning two decades,” Bart Simpson said. Mickey Rooney lived long enough to work on silent films, be the biggest star in the world and do a voiceover on “The Simpsons.” Not bad for one lifetime. Mickey Rooney died of natural causes in his North Hollywood home on April 6th. He was 93.

Rooney was a actor who worked nearly his entire life in film, television and stage. His active career as a performer spanned 92 years, and he was one of the last few in history to have worked in the silent film era. His filmography lists over 200 roles, and he also appeared in vaudeville, on Broadway and several television series. He outlived and outperformed virtually all the classic movie stars from Hollywood’s golden era of the studio system from the 1930s to the 1950s.

The »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

Permalink | Report a problem


Mickey Rooney, Legendary Actor, Dies at 93

6 April 2014 8:01 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Mickey Rooney, the pint-sized actor who was one of MGM’s giant box office attractions in the late ’30s and early ’40s, has died, sources confirm. He was 93.

As adept at comedy as drama and an excellent singer and dancer, Rooney was regarded as the consummate entertainer. During a prolific career on stage and screen that spanned eight decades (“I’ve been working all my life, but it seems longer,” he once said), he was nominated for four Academy Awards and received two special Oscars, the Juvenile Award in 1939 (shared with Deanna Durbin) and one in 1983 for his body of work.

He also appeared on series and TV and in made for television movies, one of which, “Bill,” the touching story of a mentally challenged man, won him an Emmy. He was Emmy nominated three other times. And for “Sugar Babies,” a musical revue in which he starred with Ann Miller, »

- Carmel Dagan

Permalink | Report a problem


2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006 | 2004

1-20 of 27 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners