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"Playhouse 90"
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"Playhouse 90" (1956) More at IMDbPro »TV series 1956-1961

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Overview

User Rating:
8.4/10   199 votes »
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Popularity: ?
Down 6% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Writers:
Contact:
View company contact information for Playhouse 90 on IMDbPro.
Seasons:
1 | 2 | 3 | 4
Release Date:
4 October 1956 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Plot:
Of the many anthology series, Playhouse 90 is considered the most ambitious with outstanding talent in front of the camera. Attracting top ranked directors and scripts it was often filmed live including the entire first season.
Awards:
Won Golden Globe. Another 18 wins & 36 nominations See more »
User Reviews:
A master genre that does not even exist today. See more (9 total) »

Cast

 (Series Cast Summary - 1 of 330)
Richard Joy ... Himself - Announcer / ... (62 episodes, 1956-1960)
(more)

Series Directed by
John Frankenheimer (27 episodes, 1956-1960)
Franklin J. Schaffner (19 episodes, 1957-1960)
Ralph Nelson (11 episodes, 1956-1959)
Vincent J. Donehue (6 episodes, 1956-1958)
Arthur Hiller (6 episodes, 1956-1958)
Robert Stevens (6 episodes, 1959-1960)
Arthur Penn (5 episodes, 1957-1958)
Buzz Kulik (5 episodes, 1958-1960)
George Roy Hill (4 episodes, 1957-1959)
Fielder Cook (4 episodes, 1958-1960)
Robert Mulligan (3 episodes, 1957-1960)
Delbert Mann (3 episodes, 1958-1959)
James Neilson (2 episodes, 1956-1957)
Paul Wendkos (2 episodes, 1957-1958)
Paul Nickell (2 episodes, 1957)
Oscar Rudolph (2 episodes, 1957)
Herbert Hirschman (2 episodes, 1958-1959)
Ron Winston (2 episodes, 1958-1959)
Allen Reisner (2 episodes, 1958)
David Swift (2 episodes, 1958)
Boris Sagal (2 episodes, 1959-1960)
Alex Segal (2 episodes, 1959)
Sidney Lumet (2 episodes, 1960)

Tony Barr (unknown episodes)
Karl Genus (unknown episodes)
 
Series Writing credits
Rod Serling (11 episodes, 1956-1960)
Leslie Stevens (7 episodes, 1957-1959)
James P. Cavanagh (6 episodes, 1956-1958)
David Shaw (6 episodes, 1957-1960)
Elick Moll (4 episodes, 1956-1958)
Paul Monash (4 episodes, 1956-1958)
Tad Mosel (4 episodes, 1957-1959)
David Davidson (4 episodes, 1958-1960)
A.E. Hotchner (4 episodes, 1958-1959)
Leonard Spigelgass (3 episodes, 1956-1957)
F. Scott Fitzgerald (3 episodes, 1957-1958)
Berne Giler (3 episodes, 1957-1958)
Horton Foote (3 episodes, 1958-1960)
Abby Mann (3 episodes, 1958-1959)
John Gay (3 episodes, 1959-1960)
Reginald Rose (3 episodes, 1959-1960)
Pat Frank (2 episodes, 1956-1960)
Frank D. Gilroy (2 episodes, 1956-1958)
John P. Marquand (2 episodes, 1956-1958)
William Sackheim (2 episodes, 1956-1958)
George Bruce (2 episodes, 1956-1957)
Hagar Wilde (2 episodes, 1956-1957)
George Bellak (2 episodes, 1957-1959)
Marc Brandel (2 episodes, 1957-1959)
William Durkee (2 episodes, 1957-1958)
A.J. Russell (2 episodes, 1957-1958)
Robert Alan Aurthur (2 episodes, 1957)
William Faulkner (2 episodes, 1958-1960)
Roger O. Hirson (2 episodes, 1958-1960)
Pierre Boulle (2 episodes, 1958-1959)
Steve Gethers (2 episodes, 1958-1959)
David Karp (2 episodes, 1958-1959)
J.P. Miller (2 episodes, 1958-1959)
Merle Miller (2 episodes, 1958-1959)
Mayo Simon (2 episodes, 1958-1959)
David Swift (2 episodes, 1958)
Adrian Spies (2 episodes, 1959-1960)
Ernest Hemingway (2 episodes, 1959)
Loring Mandel (2 episodes, 1959)
Meade Roberts (2 episodes, 1959)
Mel Barr (1 episode, 1957)
Fred Clasel (1 episode, 1957)
Lloyd C. Douglas (1 episode, 1957)
Jack Jacobs (1 episode, 1957)
Lulu Morgan (1 episode, 1957)
Don Murray (1 episode, 1957)
Malvin Wald (1 episode, 1957)
Robert E. McEnroe (1 episode, 1959)

Gwen Bagni (unknown episodes)
Bo Goldman (unknown episodes)

Series Produced by
Martin Manulis .... producer (44 episodes, 1956-1958)
Herbert Brodkin .... producer / executive producer (17 episodes, 1958-1960)
Peter Kortner .... producer / executive producer / ... (15 episodes, 1957-1960)
Fred Coe .... producer (15 episodes, 1958-1960)
Russell Stoneham .... associate producer / assistant producer (9 episodes, 1957-1960)
Eva Wolas .... producer (7 episodes, 1956-1957)
John Houseman .... producer (7 episodes, 1958-1959)
Bo Goldman .... associate producer (5 episodes, 1958-1959)
Julian Claman .... associate producer (4 episodes, 1956-1957)
Dominick Dunne .... assistant producer (2 episodes, 1957-1958)
Winston O'Keefe .... producer (2 episodes, 1957-1958)
William Froug .... producer (2 episodes, 1958)
Tony Barr .... associate producer (2 episodes, 1959)
Herbert Hirschman .... associate producer (2 episodes, 1959)

Mildred Freed Alberg .... producer (unknown episodes)
Joe Scully .... associate producer (unknown episodes)
 
Series Original Music by
Russell Garcia (35 episodes, 1956-1957)
Jerry Goldsmith (10 episodes, 1959-1960)

Robert Allen (unknown episodes)
John Williams (unknown episodes)
 
Series Cinematography by
Gert Andersen (11 episodes, 1956-1958)
Joseph F. Biroc (3 episodes, 1957-1958)

Albert Kurland (unknown episodes)
 
Series Film Editing by
Robert L. Swanson (6 episodes, 1957)
Henry Batista (3 episodes, 1956)
Sam Gold (2 episodes, 1957-1958)
Michael Luciano (2 episodes, 1957-1958)
Richard K. Brockway (2 episodes, 1958)
 
Series Casting by
Ethel Winant (4 episodes, 1958-1960)
 
Series Production Design by
Horace Armistead (1 episode, 1958)
 
Series Art Direction by
Albert Heschong (11 episodes, 1957-1959)
Walter Scott Herndon (9 episodes, 1956-1959)
Robert Tyler Lee (4 episodes, 1957-1958)
William Craig Smith (3 episodes, 1959-1960)
Cary Odell (2 episodes, 1956-1957)
William Flannery (2 episodes, 1957)
 
Series Set Decoration by
John Lamphear (3 episodes, 1956-1960)
Buck Henshaw (2 episodes, 1957-1958)
Arthur Jeph Parker (2 episodes, 1958)
George R. Nelson (2 episodes, 1959)
 
Series Costume Design by
Leslie Renfield (3 episodes, 1958-1959)
 
Series Makeup Department
Larry Germain .... hair stylist (3 episodes, 1957-1958)
Bud Westmore .... makeup artist (3 episodes, 1957-1958)
 
Series Production Management
Ralph Senensky .... production supervisor (3 episodes, 1958-1959)
Glenn Cook .... production manager (2 episodes, 1957-1958)
William Larsen .... production supervisor (2 episodes, 1958-1960)
 
Series Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
James Clark .... associate director (3 episodes, 1957-1959)
Ron Winston .... associate director / assistant director (3 episodes, 1957-1958)
Robert Butler .... associate director (3 episodes, 1958-1959)
Nathan Barragar .... assistant director (2 episodes, 1957-1958)

Lindsley Parsons Jr. .... second assistant director (unknown episodes)
 
Series Art Department
Mike Gordon .... property master (2 episodes, 1957-1958)
 
Series Sound Department
Robert Mott .... sound effects specialist (39 episodes, 1956-1957)
 
Series Special Effects by
Jim Fox .... special effects crew / special effects technician (2 episodes, 1958)
 
Series Visual Effects by
Louis DeWitt .... photographic effects / special photographic effects (2 episodes, 1957-1958)
Jack Rabin .... photographic effects / special photographic effects (2 episodes, 1957-1958)
 
Series Camera and Electrical Department
Leard Davis .... lighting director (6 episodes, 1957-1960)
Tom Schamp .... lighting director (5 episodes, 1956-1959)
Bill E. Grams .... lighting director / lightning (2 episodes, 1958)
Ed S. Hill .... lighting director / lightning (2 episodes, 1958)
Ralph Holmes .... lighting director (2 episodes, 1959)
 
Series Casting Department
Ethel Winant .... casting (2 episodes, 1958)
 
Series Costume and Wardrobe Department
Sophie Devine .... costume supervisor (1 episode, 1957)
Vou Lee Giokaris .... wardrobe (1 episode, 1957)
Robert O'Dell .... wardrobe (1 episode, 1957)
Lilli Ann .... costumer (1 episode, 1958)
Joseph Dimmitt .... wardrobe (1 episode, 1958)
James Linn .... wardrobe (1 episode, 1958)
 
Series Editorial Department
Fred W. Berger .... supervising editor (2 episodes, 1957-1958)
 
Series Music Department
Alex North .... composer: theme / composer: theme music / ... (127 episodes, 1956-1960)
Sammy Cahn .... composer: theme / composer: Playhouse 90 theme (125 episodes, 1956-1960)
Eugene Cines .... musical director (2 episodes, 1959)

Igo Kantor .... music editor (unknown episodes)
 
Series Other crew
Brooks Graham .... technical director (11 episodes, 1956-1959)
Peter Kortner .... story editor / script editor (8 episodes, 1956-1957)
Del Reisman .... story editor / associate story editor (6 episodes, 1957-1958)
Russell Stoneham .... assistant to producer (3 episodes, 1956-1957)
Dominick Dunne .... assistant to producer / assistant to the producer (3 episodes, 1957-1958)
Joy Munnecke .... story consultant (3 episodes, 1959-1960)
 

Production CompaniesDistributors

Additional Details

Runtime:
90 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Black and White | Color (broadcast of "The Nutcracker")
Aspect Ratio:
1.33 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
The show began in 1956 broadcasting all live 90-minute plays, with only a sub-par kinescope film (film camera aimed at the live broadcast on the TV monitor) as an archive. The second year they began to film maybe every second or third episode (as a "made-for-TV-movie"), then in the last two years began videotaping many of the episodes. The tape technique was harder to spot because the broadcasts still appeared live, but there are at least partial tapes (of excellent, pristine, quality) in the CBS vaults of P90 episodes of "Days of Wine and Roses (1958)," "The Old Man (1958)," "Judgment At Nuremberg (1959)," "Alas, Babylon (1960)," and the final 'Playhouse 90' from 1960, "In The Prescence of Mine Enemies." Clips of these actual tapes were featured in the 2002 CBS special "50 Years of Television City in Hollywood.".See more »
Soundtrack:
Song for a Summer NightSee more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
13 out of 14 people found the following review useful.
A master genre that does not even exist today., 10 October 2002
Author: movibuf1962 from Washington, DC

"Playhouse 90" came as the grand finale of that elusive TV genre which precedes even my 44 years on this earth: the dramatic anthology. Prior to this one, anthology programs had existed on the infant medium for almost a decade. The networks had KRAFT TELEVISION THEATRE, FORD THEATRE, GOODYEAR PLAYHOUSE, and STUDIO ONE as early as 1948. They all had the same common goal: presentation of self-contained, live, dramatic stories, their quality rivaled only by the best of the Broadway stage. (It was no coincidence that many of these dramas were produced in New York.) While all previous series were only 30 and 60 minute episodes, P90 introduced something new: its show was done in the "Television City" studio in Hollywood, and it was a lavish, unheard of, *90* minutes. In those days a live play could exist on a sound-stage without a studio audience with intimate, claustrophobic, camera set-ups, and present over a span of 90 minutes, "The Plot To Kill Stalin;" "Bomber's Moon;" "Bitter Heritage;" "Requiem For A Heavyweight;" "No Time At All," "The Comedian," "The Helen Morgan Story," "Judgment At Nuremberg," and "The Miracle Worker" straight through, without second takes, and on a week-by-week basis!! Stories were adaptations by Hemingway and Faulkner, as well as originals by Reginald Rose, J.P. Miller, and Rod Serling- all with stellar actors and directors. Eventually some productions were filmed in kinescope or on location as TV-movies, but the productions I'd kill to see are the ones which initiated the first ever videotape. Because videotape was not up and running until late 1957, the P90 archive of plays is uneven. Most of the museum archive is still on kinescope (which you can see at one of the two MT&R television museums on the coast of your choice), but the good news is that many plays from the last two years of the series were captured on glorious black-and-white videotape- the medium which comes closest to simulating the original live broadcast. A CBS special in 2002 dusted off some of these tapes and aired- probably only for the second time ever- clips of 1958's "The Old Man" and "Days of Wine And Roses," 1959's "Judgment at Nuremberg," and the final P90 from 1960, "In The Prescence of Mine Enemies." I suspect, sadly, that these show quality tapes are probably tied up in copyright laws and cannot be shown publicly. The series was a short, brilliant blaze of Emmy-winning glory, and came to a crashing halt in 1961- one year before I was born. I miss it.

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