Who Do You Trust? (1956–1963)
"Do You Trust Your Wife" (original title)

TV Series  -   -  Game-Show
6.4
Your rating:
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 -/10 X  
Ratings: 6.4/10 from 14 users  
Reviews: 6 user

Married pairs of contestants were asked to answer questions, the husband deciding whether he or she would answer. The original emcee Edgar Bergen was later replaced by Johnny Carson.

0Check in
0Share...

Related Items


Connect with IMDb


Share this Rating

Title: Who Do You Trust? (1956–1963)

Who Do You Trust? (1956–1963) on IMDb 6.4/10

Want to share IMDb's rating on your own site? Use the HTML below.

Take The Quiz!

Test your knowledge of Who Do You Trust?.

Season:

unknown

Year:

1956
Edit

Cast

Complete series cast summary:
Edgar Bergen ...
 Himself - Host (1 episode, 1956)
Edwin Reimers ...
 Himself - Announcer (1 episode, 1956)
Edit

Storyline

Married pairs of contestants were asked to answer questions, the husband deciding whether he or she would answer. The original emcee Edgar Bergen was later replaced by Johnny Carson.

Add Full Plot | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Game-Show

Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

3 January 1956 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Who Do You Trust?  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Quotes

[Firefighter describes a fire at a brassiere factory]
Firefighter (guest contestant): And you know what the smell was, Johnny? Burnt rubber.
Himself - Host: Sort of a falsie alarm?
See more »

Connections

Version of Do You Trust Your Wife? (1956) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

Not grammatically correct, but a good show
24 March 2002 | by (Sapporo, Japan) – See all my reviews

As was pointed out by an actor playing the role of a sound man on a promotional spot at the time, to be grammatically correct, the show should have been entitled, "Whom Do You Trust?" But Johnny Carson was aiming his tribute to Groucho Marx's "You Bet Your Life" at the mass audience, not school marms. As Groucho had done on "You Bet our Life," Johnny would engage in banter with two guests who didn't necessarily know each other, let slip a few mischievous double entendres which were cute, funny, and pushing the limits of TV censorship all at the same time, and then pull out his quiz cards so that the guests as contestants could now try to win some money. "The next category is famous middle names. Which of you feels confident with this category. Who do you trust? Here's the first one: Robert Louis Stevenson. Oh, sorry. I'm not supposed to say the middle name." And at Ed McMahon laughing in the wings: "Well, you try saying that name without 'Louis' in the middle!" I remember that partly because the contestant failed to get the correct answer for the name that was then substituted for the author of "Treasure Island."

The main difference to "You Bet Your Life" was that whereas the Marx show was broadcast in the evening, causing a lot of kids to beg to stay up, "Who Do You Trust" was broadcast (on the East Coast, anyway) at 3:30 PM, causing quite a few kids to get home from school early. Later, of course, prepared with his several years of seasoning on daytime television, Johnny Carson became the King of the Night and as such, according to statistical studies, was an alternative to other nighttime activities and therefore a recognized form of birth control across America.


6 of 7 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Recent Posts
I Thought it was called,'Who Do You Trust'. glasshull
Discuss Who Do You Trust? (1956) on the IMDb message boards »

Contribute to This Page