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The Trouble with Harry (1955) Poster

Trivia

Jump to: Director Cameo (1)
One of Alfred Hitchcock's favorites of all his films.
The film was unavailable for decades because its rights (together with four other pictures of the same period) were bought back by Alfred Hitchcock and left as part of his legacy to his daughter. They've been known for years as the infamous "5 lost Hitchcocks" among film buffs, and were re-released in theaters around 1984 after a 30-year absence. The others are The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956), Rear Window (1954), Rope (1948) and Vertigo (1958).
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Film debut of Shirley MacLaine.
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Originally designed by Alfred Hitchcock as an experiment in seeing how audiences would react to a non-star-driven film. He was of the opinion that oftentimes having a big star attached actually hindered the narrative flow and style of the story. He also developed the film with a view to test how American audiences would react to a more subtle brand of humor than that which they were used to.
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Location filming in Vermont was hampered by heavy rainfall. Many exterior scenes were actually filmed on sets constructed in a local high school gymnasium. Much of the dialogue recorded there was inaudible due to the rainfall on the tin roof, so much post-recording was necessary.
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Although this was a failure in the US, it played for a year in England and Italy, and for a year and a half in France.
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"What seems to be the trouble, Captain?" was Alfred Hitchcock's favorite line from all his movies.
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When Music Composer Lyn Murray was working on the music score for To Catch a Thief (1955), Alfred Hitchcock was already looking for a composer for this film, which was to be his next. So Murray suggested Bernard Herrmann. This was the beginning of the long professional relationship between Hitchcock and Herrmann.
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Several scenes had to be shot in a rented high school gym because of the rain. In the gym, a 500-lb. Technicolor camera fell from a great height, narrowly missing Alfred Hitchcock.
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Due to the indifferent weather conditions in Vermont, boxes and boxes of autumnal leaves were shipped back to California where they were painstakingly pinned onto trees on a studio soundstage.
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The stained glass lampshade which appears in the Captain's house was also used for set dressing in Hitchcock's film "The Man Who Knew Too Much."
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Philip Truex cameo as the deceased title character is his last appearance in a film.
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Alfred Hitchcock bought the rights to the original novel anonymously for just $11,000.
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Alfred Hitchcock insisted on using a real actor for the body of Harry. He chose Philip Truex.
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Bernard Herrmann's score was Alfred Hitchcock's favorite of the seven films they did together.
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Composer Bernard Herrmann arranged his themes from this film into a concert suite he called "A Portrait of Hitch".
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Harry gets dug up three times throughout the film.
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Edmund Gwenn's fourth and last film with Alfred Hitchcock.
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The poem that the doctor is reading when he finally discovers the body is Sonnet 116 by William Shakespeare.
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The old car driven by the deputy sheriff is an English car with the steering wheel on the right. At one point the deputy is shown driving it on the left side of the road as in England rather than on the right.
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Parts of Bernard Herrmann's score was lifted from the music he had composed for a radio series called "Crime Classics".
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Director Cameo 

Alfred Hitchcock:  about 20 minutes in, walking past the limousine of a man looking at the paintings.
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Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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