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"The Alfred Hitchcock Collection" Blu-ray Set From Universal

  • CinemaRetro
Universal has released a highly impressive Blu-ray set, "The Alfred Hitchcock Collection", on Blu-ray. The set contains fifteen special editions of the Master's top films as well as ten original episodes of "The Alfred Hitchcock Presents" television series. The set is packed with 15 hours of bonus extras and includes an illustrated, 58-page collector's booklet with extremely rare international poster art and film stills. Films included in the set are:

Psycho The Birds Vertigo Rear Window North by Northwest The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956 version) Marnie Saboteur Shadow of a Doubt Rope The Trouble with Harry Topaz Frenzy  Torn Curtain Family Plot

 

Holiday gifts like this don't get any more impressive (or sinister) for the movie lover in your life.

Click Here To Order From Amazon
See full article at CinemaRetro »

"Peyton Place" 60th Anniversary Screening, July 12, L.A.

  • CinemaRetro
By Todd Garbarini

Mark Robson’s 1957 film Peyton Place celebrates its 60th anniversary with a special screening at the Royal Theatre in Los Angeles. The film, which runs 157 minutes, stars Lana Turner, Lee Philips, Lloyd Nolan, Arthur Kennedy, Russ Tamblyn, Terry More, and Hope Lange.

Please Note: Actress Terry Moore is currently scheduled to appear at the screening as part of a Q & A regarding the film and her career.

From the press release:

Part of our Anniversary Classics series. For details, visit: laemmle.com/ac.

Peyton Place (1957)

60th Anniversary Screening

Wednesday, July 12, at 7:00 Pm at the Royal Theatre

Q & A with Co-Star Terry Moore

Laemmle Theatres and the Anniversary Classics Series present a 60th anniversary screening of 'Peyton Place,' the smash hit movie version of Grace Metalious’s best-selling novel. The film earned nine top Academy Award nominations, including Best Picture, Best Director, and Best Adapted Screenplay.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

C.O. 'Doc' Erickson dead at 93

C.O. 'Doc' Erickson dead at 93
The producer and production manager associated with Chinatown and Groundhog Day, died on Wednesday from heart complications.

Born on December 17,1923, C.O. ‘Doc’ Erickson was living in Las Vegas when he died from heart complications, according to The Gersh Agency.

Erickson began his career at Paramount Pictures, serving as production manager on five Alfred Hitchcock films during the mid-to-late 1950s, including Rear Window, To Catch A Thief, The Trouble With Harry, The Man Who Knew Too Much and Vertigo.

The producer left Paramount in the early 1960s to become John Huston’s associate producer on The Misfits, Freud, and 1967s Reflections In A Golden Eye.

He went on to serve as production manager on Joseph L Mankiewicz’s There Was A Crooked Man and also spent three years supervising film production for Brut Productions.

He would later become associated with Robert Evans on Chinatown, Players, Urban Cowboy, and Popeye.

Other producer-production credits include 55 Days At Peking, [link
See full article at ScreenDaily »

C.O. ‘Doc’ Erickson, Alfred Hitchcock Associate, Dies at 93

C.O. ‘Doc’ Erickson, Alfred Hitchcock Associate, Dies at 93
Longtime motion picture producer and executive C.O. “Doc” Erickson, who worked on Alfred Hitchcock’s movies along with “Chinatown,” “Blade Runner,” and “Groundhog Day,” died Wednesday in Las Vegas due to heart complications. He was 93.

He began his career at Paramount Pictures, serving as production manager on five Hitchcock films: “Rear Window” (1954), “To Catch a Thief” (1955), “The Trouble with Harry” (1955), “The Man Who Knew Too Much” (1956), and “Vertigo” (1958).

He left Paramount to become John Huston’s associate producer on “The Misfits” (1961), “Freud” (1962), and “Reflections in a Golden Eye” (1967). He was production manager on Joseph L. Mankiewicz’s “There Was a Crooked Man…” (1970).

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Erickson spent three years supervising film production for Brut Productions and later became associated with Robert Evans on “Chinatown” (1974), “Players” (1979), “Urban Cowboy” (1980), and “Popeye” (1980). Other producer/production credits include “55 Days at Peking” (1963), “Magic” (1978), “Blade Runner” (1982), “Nicholas and Alexandra” (1971), “Fast Times at Ridgemont High” (1982), “The Lonely Guy” (1984), “Stuart Saves His Family” (1995), and
See full article at Variety - Film News »

C.O. “Doc” Erickson Dies: Hitchcock & Huston Veteran Who Later Worked On ‘Chinatown’ & ‘Groundhog Day’ Was 93

C.O. “Doc” Erickson Dies: Hitchcock & Huston Veteran Who Later Worked On ‘Chinatown’ & ‘Groundhog Day’ Was 93
C.O. “Doc” Erickson, a production manager on several Alfred Hitchcock and John Huston films who went on to produce such films as Chinatown, Blade Runner, Fast Times at Ridgemont High and Groundhog Day, died Wednesday in Las Vegas of heart complications. He was 93. Born December 17, 1923 in Kankakee, Il, Erickson began his career at Paramount Pictures, serving as production manager on Hitchcock’s 1950s films Rear Window, To Catch a Thief, The Trouble with Harry, The Man Who…
See full article at Deadline »

Rushes. Robert Pattinson Covers, Apichatpong x Ryuichi Sakamoto, "Girls Gone Wild 1863"

Get in touch to send in cinephile news and discoveries. For daily updates follow us @NotebookMUBI.NEWSBlind DetectiveThe San Francisco Museum of Modern Art will hosting what we believe—and correct us if we'r wrong—is the first significant retrospective in the United States of the great Hong Kong genre director Johnnie To.Recommended VIEWINGFor one more day only Gabe Klinger's Double Play: James Benning and Richard Linklater, a 2013 documentary about two directors on different ends of American independent cinema, will be available to watch for free on Vimeo.A lovely collaboration between Thai auteur Apichatpong Weerasethakul (Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives) and Japanese composer (and sometimes actor) Ryuichi Sakamoto on the video for a track on his new album, async. Related: the director and composer are holding a short film competition stemming from the album. Critics Christopher Small and James Corning have lately been contributing excellent video essays to the Notebook on such directors as William Friedkin, John Carpenter, and Ernst Lubitsch. For Fandor, they've made another excellent directorial dive, in this case into the contradictory cinema of Hollywood comedy director Leo McCarey.Kirsten Dunst and Elle Fanning shoot "Girls Gone Wild 1863" behind the scenes of Sofia Coppola's The Beguiled. Warning: risqué ankle footage!Recommended Reading

The new issues of Cahiers du cinéma (out now) and Cinema Scope (coming soon) both focus on the just-completely Cannes Film Festival and have Robert Pattinson in the Safdie brothers' Good Time on the cover. Cahiers editor Stéphane Delorme has written a scathing, and to our eyes accurate, assessment of the festival, which we're reading in (please excuse us) adapted Google translation:The program of the Official is truly a program, in the programmatic sense: it has encouraged a certain type of hateful, hollow and pretentious cinema which is becoming sadly the cinema of our time.... In this context, two small wonders emerged: Good Time by the Safdies and The Day After by Hong Sang-soo... Dumont, Garrel, Claire Denis, everyone would have deserved the Palme. Authors in an insolent form that are renewed (musical comedy, sex, comedy) and who still know what it means to stage, edit, plan.This week the great American actress Gina Rowlands celebrated her 85th birthday, and Sheila O'Malley has written an excellent article on her and some of her key performances for RogerEbert.com:Rowlands' work has a way of creating anxiety in viewers. The boundary line between character and actress is obliterated; or, it was never there in the first place. Her work is so unlike what we see from most other actresses (even very good ones) that it's unnerving to watch.Alfred Hitchcock on the set of RopeAmerican Cinematographer has republished an essential 1967 interview with "The Cameraman's Director," Alfred Hitchcock:Q: Do you feel that lighting is perhaps the most important single element in the creation of cinematic mood?

A: Motion picture mood is often thought of as almost exclusively a matter of lighting, dark lighting. It isn’t. Mood is apprehension. That’s what you’ve got in that crop-duster scene. In other words, as I said years and years ago, I prefer “murder by the babbling brook.” you’ve got some of that in The Trouble With Harry. Where did I lay the dead body? Among the most beautiful colors I could find. Autumn in Vermont. Went up there and waited for the leaves to turn. We did it in counterpoint. I wanted to take a nasty taste away by making the setting beautiful. I have sometimes been accused of building a film around an effect, but in my sort of film you often have to do that if you want to get something other than the cliche.We think it's safe to say that Twin Peaks: The Return, despite being 7 episodes and nearly as many hours in, remains a mystery. We're hosting on-going and in-depth recaps of the episodes as they premiere, and at Filmmaker magazine Michael Sicinski has proposed five ideas about David Lynch and Mark Frost's new...thing:This transfer of violent energy is connected to the Black Lodge [...] but more significantly it is related to the program before us. Lynch is warning us that Twin Peaks is not background TV, and that in certain respects it is dangerous stuff. Sorry, young lovers. You need to watch that glass box carefully, because you’re strapping in for the long haul.EXTRASSome jaw-dropping analysis by Jean-Luc Godard on the relationship between film and television, courtesy of critic Max Nelson.From the Filmadrid festival, a meeting of two great figures in the film world: scholar Laura Mulvey and filmmaker Jonas Mekas.Confirming the sense of humor of Robert Bresson (he who put Chaplin's The Gold Rush and City Lights as his favorite films) is this photo of the perhaps the greatest of all filmmakers riding the donkey that appeared in his masterpiece Au hazard Balthazar.
See full article at MUBI »

Peyton Place

The book was raw & dirty, and did you read what that girl did with that guy on page 167? Racking up a stack of Oscar nominations, Peyton Place became one of the big hits of its year, launched the careers of several young actors, and proved that Hollywood could pasteurize most any so-called un-filmable book. Lana Turner is the nominal star but the leading actress is Diane Varsi, in her film debut.

Peyton Place

Blu-ray

Twilight Time

1957 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 157 min. / Street Date March 14, 2017 / Available from the Twilight Time Movies Store 29.95

Starring: Lana Turner, Hope Lange, Arthur Kennedy, Lloyd Nolan, Lee Philips, Terry Moore, Russ Tamblyn, Betty Field, David Nelson, Leon Ames, Mildred Dunnock.

Cinematography William Mellor

Art Direction Jack Martin Smith, Lyle R. Wheeler

Film Editor David Bretherton

Original Music Franz Waxman

Written by John Michael Hayes from the book by Grace Metalious

Produced by Jerry Wald

Directed by Mark Robson

What’s this,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Vertigo Screens at The Hi-Pointe Saturday Morning – Here are Alfred Hitchcock’s Ten Best Movies

Article by Jim Batts, Dana Jung, and Tom Stockman

Alfred Hitchcock’s Vertigo screens at St. Louis’ fabulous Hi-Pointe Theater this weekend as part of their Classic Film Series. It’s Saturday, March 11th at 10:30am at the Hi-Pointe located at 1005 McCausland Ave., St. Louis, Mo 63117. The film will be introduced by Harry Hamm, movie reviewer for Kmox. Admission is only $5

This gives us a perfect excuse to re-run this top ten list so here, according to We Are Movie Geeks, are Alfred Hitchcock’s ten best films:

Frenzy

Frenzy, Hitchcock’s next to last feature film from 1972, represented a homecoming of sorts since it was the first film completely shot in his native England since his silents and early ” talkies ” in the 1930’s. By dipping into the then somewhat new territory of serial killers, he took full advantage of the new cinema freedoms and truly earned his ‘ R ‘ MPAA rating.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Alfred Hitchcock’s Rear Window – Midnights This Weekend at The Tivoli

“A murderer would never parade his crime in front of an open window”.

Rear Window plays this weekend (July 15th and 16th) at The Tivoli at midnight as part of their Reel Late at the Tivoli midnight series.

As with so many of Alfred’s Hitchcock’s films, Rear Window (1954) is a wonderful example of how to take an almost absurdly simple idea and spin out the maximum tension, character, humor and drama from it. It should be boring (a movie set in one room with a guy who can’t move) and ludicrous (a killer who murders his wife and chops her up in front of his neighbors) but it’s quite the opposite – riveting and eerily plausible. If ever there was a film about voyeurism and its relationship to cinema, this is it; Hitchcock tells engrossing little silent movies of the tenants (the newlyweds, the sculptress, Miss Torso,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

The Captive City | Blu-ray Review

Two obscure Robert Wise titles reach Blu-ray release this month, both direct follow-ups to some of the auteur’s more iconic works. First up is 1962’s Two for the Seesaw, a romantic drama headlined by Robert Mitchum and Shirley MacLaine following the famed 1961 title West Side Story. But the decade prior would fine Wise unveiling one of his most stilted efforts, The Captive City (1952), a sort-of noir procedural which followed his sci-fi social commentary The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951). Providing John Forsythe with his first starring role (a performer who would find his most famous roles decades later on television, as Blake Carrington in “Dynasty,” and of course, the famous voice in “Charlie’s Angels”), it has to be one of the most unenthusiastic renderings of organized crime ever committed to celluloid. A scrappy journalist defies the mob ruled police force and a slick Mafia boss in a tired
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Locarno — Lionel Baier: ‘Families Are the Most Dangerous Social Group on Earth’

Playing next week at Locarno’s Piazza Grande — one sign of a potential crowd-pleaser — “Vanity” (“La Vanité”) is the seventh movie from Lionel Baier, one of Switzerland’s young filmmakers with a fairly high international profile. His scribe-helmer credits include “Another Man” (2008), “Longwave” (2013), and “Stupid Boy” (2004).

Pedro Almodovar muse Carmen Maura, who won a 2012 Cesar for Philippe Le Guay’s “Service Entrance,” and Patrick Lapp (“Longwave”) star in “Vanity,” a euthanasia comedy produced by Bande à Part Films, founded by Baier and fellow filmmakers Ursula Meier, Jean-Stephane Bron and Frederic Mermoud.

World premiered in Cannes’ Acid sidebar, “Vanity” will be released in France via Happiness Distribution; Frenetic will open it in Switzerland. Loic Magneron’s Wide Management handles “Vanity” international rights. In “Vanity,” a terminally ill man decides to end it all with the help of a pro-euthanasia association. A day is scheduled, but it begins to looks like his
See full article at Variety - Film News »

'Psycho': 25 Things You (Probably) Didn't Know About Hitchcock's Classic

Besides making people forever afraid of motel-room showers, Alfred Hitchcock's "Psycho" continues to have an incalculable impact on popular culture. Though it was released 55 years ago this week (on June 16, 1960), it continues to inspire filmmakers and TV producers. In just the last three years, we've seen the 2012 film "Hitchcock" (based on Stephen Rebello's book "Alfred Hitchcock and the Making of 'Psycho,'" and starring Anthony Hopkins as the director and Scarlett Johansson as Janet Leigh) and the ongoing A&E TV prequel drama series, "Bates Motel."

Still, for all of the "Psycho" trivia revealed in "Hitchcock," the biopic barely scratches the surface of how the film got made, from the men who inspired the invention of Norman Bates, to the trickery Hitchcock used to tease the press while keeping the film's convention-shredding narrative twists a secret, to the film's unlikely connection to "Leave It to Beaver." Here,
See full article at Moviefone »

The Birds Screens at Schlafly Thursday – Here are Alfred Hitchcock’s Ten Best Movies

Article by Jim Batts, Dana Jung, and Tom Stockman

The Birds screens at Schlafly Bottleworks (7260 Southwest Ave.- at Manchester – Maplewood, Mo 63143) Thursday, April 2nd at 7pm. It is a benefit for Helping Kids Together (more details about this event can be found Here)

This gives us a perfect excuse to re-run this top ten list from March of 2012. Alfred Hitchcock directed 54 feature films between 1925 and 1976, and here, according to We Are Movie Geeks, are his ten best:

Frenzy

Frenzy, Hitchcock’s next to last feature film from 1972, represented a homecoming of sorts since it was the first film completely shot in his native England since his silents and early ” talkies ” in the 1930’s. By dipping into the then somewhat new territory of serial killers, he took full advantage of the new cinema freedoms and truly earned his ‘ R ‘ MPAA rating. Perhaps ole’ ” Hitch ” wanted to give those young up-and-coming
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Amazon Special: Save $200 On The Hitchcock Blu-ray Limited Edition Masterpiece Collection

  • CinemaRetro
Amazon is selling the Hitchcock Masterpiece Collection Blu-ray edition at a savings of $200.

The set consists of 15 classic movies:

Rope, Shadow of a Doubt, Rear Window, The Trouble With Harry, The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956 version), Vertigo, North By Northwest, Psycho, The Birds, Marnie, Torn Curtain, Topaz, Frenzy and Family Plot. 

 Every film is packed with sensational bonus features. 

Click Here To Order And To View Promotional Video For The Set 

 
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Alfred Hitchcock’s Rear Window Screens This Saturday Morning at The Hi-Pointe

“A murderer would never parade his crime in front of an open window”.

Rear Window Screens at The Hi-Pointe Theater in St. Louis Saturday morning January 31st at 10:30am

As with so many of Alfred’s Hitchcock’s films, Rear Window (1954) is a wonderful example of how to take an almost absurdly simple idea and spin out the maximum tension, character, humor and drama from it. It should be boring (a movie set in one room with a guy who can’t move) and ludicrous (a killer who murders his wife and chops her up in front of his neighbors) but it’s quite the opposite – riveting and eerily plausible. If ever there was a film about voyeurism and its relationship to cinema, this is it; Hitchcock tells engrossing little silent movies of the tenants (the newlyweds, the sculptress, Miss Torso, the dog-owners, the killer, the songwriter, Miss Lonelyhearts
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Deal! Pick Up the Alfred Hitchcock: The Masterpiece Collection Blu-ray on Sale Now

One Blu-ray collection I do not own, but am really tempted to pull the trigger on right now is the Alfred Hitchcock: The Masterpiece Collection as Amazon has dropped the price down to $98.99. The set includes 15 of Hitchcock's films including classics such as Rear Window, Vertigo, North by Northwest, Psycho, The Birds and Rope and all the special features that come with them. Msrp on the collection is $299.98 and the sale ends at midnight tonight so if you're looking to pick it up you better hustle. Here's the complete listing of movies that come on the set and you can click here to pick it up for yourself and take a look at all the features it includes. Saboteur Shadow of a Doubt Rope Rear Window The Trouble with Harry The Man Who Knew Too Much Vertigo North by Northwest Psycho The Birds Marnie Torn Curtain Topaz Frenzy Family Plot
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

Video of the Day: See Every Alfred Hitchcock Cameo

Any Hitchcock fan has no doubt looked carefully while watching one of his movies in order to spot his infamous cameos. Hitchcock’s earlier cameos are especially hard to catch, and so Youtube user Morgan T. Rhys put together this video compiling every cameo Alfred Hitchcock ever made.

Hitchcock made a total of 39 self-referential cameos in his films over a 50 year period. Four of his films featured two cameo appearances (The Lodger: A Story of the London Fog UK), Suspicion, Rope, and Under Capricorn). Two recurring themes featured Hitchcock carrying a musical instrument, and using public transportation.

The films are as follows:

The Lodger (1927), Easy Virtue (1928), Blackmail (1929),Murder! (1930), The Man Who Knew Too Much (1934), The 39 Steps (1935),Sabotage (1936), Young and Innocent (1937), The Lady Vanishes (1938), Rebecca(1940), Foreign Correspondent (1940), Mr. & Mrs. Smith (1941), Suspicion (1941),Saboteur (1942), Shadow of a Doubt (1943), Lifeboat (1944), Spellbound (1945),Notorious (1946), The Paradine Case (1947), Rope (1948), Under Capricorn (1949),Stage Fright (1950), Strangers on a Train
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Movies This Week: August 8-14, 2014

The Austin Film Society kicks off a brand new series featuring classic films from Roger Corman (Jette's preview) with a related documentary called That Guy Dick Miller, about the famed character actor. Tonight's screening will feature a post-film Q&A with Mr. Miller via Skype. It will be followed by a 35mm screening of Corman's 1959 feature A Bucket Of Blood, which features a great lead performance by Dick Miller. The film will also play again on Sunday afternoon.

On Wednesday, Whitey: The United States Of America V. James J. Bulger (from Joe Berlinger, the director of Paradise Lost) will be featured for Doc Nights (Elizabeth's preview), and this month's Essential Cinema series with the incredible Barbara Stanwyck (Elizabeth's preview) finds her on Thursday night starring in a 1937 drama called Internes Can't Take Money, screening in a rare 35mm print. 

At the Paramount's Summer Classic Film Series, you can catch a
See full article at Slackerwood »

Beauty Vs Beast: Him Freud, Her Jane

Ja from Mnpp here - The Film Experience is taking a look back at 1964 all this month and so it's the perfect time for our "Beauty Vs Beast" series to take a look at a movie that's turning 50 next month (it was released on July 22nd, 1964) and wades so deep into morally murky waters you're never quite sure which end of the screen you're rooting for (if any), making it perfect for this poll - I speak of Alfred Hitchcock's Marnie.

Starring Tippi Hedren as the titular troubled girl turned to theivery and Sean Connery as the businessman alternately turned on and repelled by that rascally blonde's baser instincts, Marnie's awash in dream symbols (so many snapping purses!) and psychiatry talk - too much of the latter by my count; like Hitch's film Spellbound I  always find his movie's at their least interesting when they're explicitly spelling out his psychological obsessions.
See full article at FilmExperience »

God’S Pocket – The Review

Just a week after the release of a feature film directed by a prominent actor, I’m speaking of Fading Gigolo by John Tuturro, comes another one helmed by an actor. But this is his feature film debut, oh, and he’s not in front of the camera (but Tuturro is, the busy guy!). God’S Pocket is helmed by John Slattery who has attained TV immortality as indulgent “bad boy” Roger Sterling on AMC’s “Mad Men”, where he cut his film making teeth calling the shots on five episodes. With this feature he’s back doing a period piece (his TV show is set from 1960-69, while this film appears to be from the late 70′s early 80′s…no cell phones or computers and everybody drives a big ‘gas-guzzler’), but the characters are laborers and petty thieves, not ad execs. Same general East Coast area though. The film
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »
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