To Catch a Thief
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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2002

5 items from 2015


Filmmakers Take Advantage of Monaco’s No-Fee Production

11 June 2015 1:30 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Monaco has ranked as a desirable shooting location for international productions ever since Alfred Hitchock lensed “To Catch a Thief” there in 1954.

Despite lacking a tax shelter, in the past two decades Monaco has hosted such films as Steven Soderbergh’s “Ocean’s Twelve,” Robert Downey Jr. starrer “Iron Man 2,” Pascal Chaumeil’s “Heartbreaker” and Pierre Salvadori’s “Priceless.”

With its ornate Casino (pictured above) and Opera, and palaces like the Hermitage and Hotel de Paris, the luxurious neighborhood known as Monte Carlo ranks among the world’s most opulent places.

Since Monaco isn’t part of France, it doesn’t offer the same attractive tax incentives — a 20% tax rebate capped for foreign productions — but it boasts low business taxes (and no income taxes for individuals).

Charles III, the prince of Monaco and a film lover, has inherited the public-image awareness of his mother, Grace Kelly, and understands the power of media. »

- Elsa Keslassy

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The Academy Announces 8-Week Summer Film Series

22 April 2015 6:52 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Got your Summer film calendar planned yet? On Wednesday The Academy announced their May and June programs which will explore the past, present and especially the future of moviegoing, as the availability of a wide variety of platforms for viewing films alters the habits of today’s audiences.

“The New Audience: Moviegoing in a Connected World,” a live panel presentation on May 12, complements “This Is Widescreen,” an eight-week screening series beginning May 1 that illustrates one of the ways filmmakers more than a half-century ago responded to the competition of that era, television.

The New Audience: Moviegoing In A Connected World

Tuesday, May 12│7:30 P.M.│Samuel Goldwyn Theater, Beverly Hills

Moderator Krista Smith, Vanity Fair’s executive West Coast editor, will lead an onstage panel discussion of how filmmakers and studios seek to take advantage of the wide variety of viewing platforms available to contemporary audiences.

Scheduled guests include Walt »

- Michelle McCue

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Alfred Hitchcock; The Man Who Knew Too Much reviews – how the master exploited our fears

13 April 2015 3:00 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Two new analyses of the director’s macabre imagination offer equally compelling explanations for the big-screen nightmares he created

Hitchcock, described by a colleague as “a know-it-all Sob”, was the man who knew too much about us. His films exploited our abiding terrors – beaked raptors assaulting us from the skies, a loose stair opening an abyss beneath our feet, nourishment concealing death in a glass of bedtime milk – and added a new one when he made the shower a last redoubt of quaking vulnerability. Those who write about him have an anthropological conundrum to puzzle over: why are these irrational alarms so inescapable and why do we so enjoy being tormented when we watch The Birds, Shadow of a Doubt, Suspicion, Psycho and the rest?

The newest books on Hitchcock answer the questions in different ways. Peter Ackroyd sees him as a case for Freudian treatment, who assumed that his neuroses were universal. »

- Peter Conrad

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Best film and TV thrillers on Netflix

18 March 2015 3:00 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Thrillers come in all shapes and sizes, from sophisticated legal dramas to high-octane and shocking action features.

With the atmospheric and absorbing Netflix original series Bloodline arriving this week, here are some of the best TV and movie thrillers on Netflix:

Oldboy

Not for the faint of heart, South Korean director Park Chan-wook's Oldboy tells the story of a man who is locked away for 15 years without knowing the identity of his captor or the reason for his punishment.

When he is released just as inexplicably, he finds himself with only five days to unravel the mystery, save the woman he loves and seek vengeance against the people who destroyed his life.

Damages

The amazing Glenn Close and Rose Byrne star as two dysfunctional lawyers in the show that combines legal drama with psychological thriller.

With non-linear storytelling and a powerful atmosphere of paranoia over five seasons, you'll learn to suspect everyone, »

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Garcia, Ossard, Neville, Fremaux, Konchalovsky, Make Kusturica’s 8th Kustendorf Fest

22 January 2015 6:15 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

L.A.-based Mexican producer-financier Alex Garcia, French producer Claudie Ossard and Amanda Neville, British Film Institute CEO, form the three-member jury panel at this year’s 8th Kustendorf Intl. Film and Music Festival, which opened Jan. 21 with a gala screening of Venice competition player “The Postman’s White Nights.”

Beforehand, director Andrei Konchalovsky took an audience through some of the challenges of filmmaking, such as the stolidity of the camera, which, per a festival report, he explained, citing Robert Bresson’s diktat: “The camera is like the eye of a cow.”

Also in attendance: Cannes director Thierry Fremaux, to present a restored copy of 1929’s “In the Night,” the only film helmed by resilient French actor Charles-Marie Vanel, whise 77-year career took included being seen with Cary Grant in Alfred Hitchcock’s “To Catch a Thief.” Vanel received a tribute-retrospective at Lyon’s 2013 Lumière Festival, which Fremaux runs with Institut Lumière president Bertrand Tavernier, »

- John Hopewell

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2002

5 items from 2015


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