A small town sportswriter attending the World Series recognizes a young ballplayer as the son of former baseball hero who was banned for throwing a game.

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(story), (as Frank Nugent)
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Cast

Episode cast overview:
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Ruth Dahlberg
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Buck Goodhue, alias Buck Garrison
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Lyn Goodhue (as Pat Wayne)
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Ed Shafer
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Mr. Cully
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Mr. White
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Mr. Walker
Robert Lyden ...
Willie (as Robert Leyden)
Tiger Fafara ...
Bobby
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Storyline

A reporter recognizes a hot young baseball player as the son of a former famous - and infamous - ballplayer who was accused of throwing the World Series. Written by Jim Beaver <jumblejim@prodigy.net>

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Genres:

Comedy | Drama | Romance

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Release Date:

7 December 1955 (USA)  »

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Technical Specs

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(Western Electric Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Goofs

Lyn Goodhue is seen playing for the New York Yankees wearing the number 4 on his uniform. The Yankees retired No. 4 on July 4, 1939, to honor its original wearer Lou Gehrig. See more »

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User Reviews

 
Gem of television's golden age

John Ford was already beginning his decline (see, for example, his "The Horse Soldiers") but he still had an eye for a good story.

And he knew how to assemble a top-notch cast.

According to show biz legend, John Wayne was asked to be Marshal Matt Dillon but he declined and recommended James Arness. The Duke made a few appearances on shows such as the abysmal Joey Bishop and even "Laugh In," as well as the famous bit on "I Love Lucy." But this was his first and, I think, only dramatic role.

His frequent co-star, and eventual TV mega-star, Ward Bond, and another frequent co-star, the beautiful and very talented Vera Miles, and his frequent co-star and son, Patrick, all appeared in "Rookie," as well as that wonderful veteran, James Gleason.

Them were the good ol' days, the true Golden Age of Television, and if this entry in "Screen Directors Playhouse," or, really, any of the entries, comes around again, most likely on Turner Classic Movies, be sure to watch. This is classic.


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