The Night of the Hunter
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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2006

16 items from 2016


Marni Nixon Remembered: A Wonderful Collaborator, Even if Natalie Wood Didn’t Agree

25 July 2016 5:41 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

“You are the writer, but I am the author!”

When famed ghost-singer Marni Nixon said those words to me, her ghostwriter, I didn’t quite understand how any of it would work. I had written previous books on my own (“That Book about That Girl,” “Noel Coward: A Bio-bibliography”), but had never been a ghostwriter before. And aren’t they one and the same: author and writer?

What I eventually learned from that “Marni-ese” was that it was all about collaboration. Over the course of a year and a half of intense back and forth work on her memoirs, “I Could Have Sung All Night” (which we almost called “Audrey Hepburn Dubbed My Face”), I came to realize that Marni Nixon was the consummate collaborator.

She was dubbed “the ghostess with the mostest” by Time Magazine when it became public knowledge that she had dubbed Deborah Kerr, Natalie Wood »

- Stephen Cole

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Fangoria Podcast Network: “The Girls In The Back Row” Revisits “The Night Of The Hunter”!

16 June 2016 9:25 AM, PDT | Fangoria | See recent Fangoria news »

On this week’s eerie episode of The Girls In The Back Row, Tab is joined by Ed from the Are You Still Afraid Of The Dark? Podcast to talk about Charles Laughton’s The Night Of The Hunter. The petrifying pair discuss Laughton’s amazing direction, the film’s harsh initial criticism, and the tragic ending to Laughton’s […] »

- Fangoria Staff

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The Horrors of Faith and Childhood in Night Of The Hunter and Whistle Down The Wind

9 June 2016 12:38 PM, PDT | shocktillyoudrop.com | See recent shocktillyoudrop news »

Shock looks at two classic films that examine the horrors of impoverished childhood and misunderstood faith. Actor Charles Laughton’s only directorial outing was the phenomenal The Night of the Hunter (1955); a hybrid of horror and noir complete with the terrifying and terrific Robert Mitchum aping Karloff’s Frankenstein monster in one electrifying scene. The…

The post The Horrors of Faith and Childhood in Night Of The Hunter and Whistle Down The Wind appeared first on Shock Till You Drop. »

- Chris Alexander

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Here Comes Mr. Jordan

6 June 2016 8:29 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Here's a sterling example of what Hollywood excelled at back in the golden age: Robert Montgomery, Evelyn Keyes, Claude Rains and Edward Everett Horton star in possibly the most magical of movies known as Film Blanc. A cosmic goof leaves a man with fifty years yet to live without a body -- so heavenly troubleshooters try to find him a new one. Here Comes Mr. Jordan Blu-ray The Criterion Collection 819 1941 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 94 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date June 14, 2016 / 39.95 Starring Robert Montgomery, Evelyn Keyes, Claude Rains, Rita Johnson, Edward Everett Horton, James Gleason. Cinematography Joseph Walker Art Direction Lionel Banks Film Editor Viola Lawrence Original Music Frederick Hollander Written by Sidney Buchman, Seton I. Miller from the play Heaven Can Wait by Harry Segall Produced by Everett Riskin Directed by Alexander Hall

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Some movies are so entertaining that it's best to tell people, »

- Glenn Erickson

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The Last Heist – Review

3 June 2016 5:01 AM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Review by Stephen Tronicek

Lots of good movies borrow from great movies. Tarantino did it in Reservoir Dogs, and Scorsese even did it in The Departed. Good ideas come from throwbacks of famous genres past all the time. The Last Heist steals from all the heist movies, and tries to be as interesting as most of those. One can only imagine the pitch for The Last Heist: We’re going to do a sleek modern robbers movie, but one of the guys in the bank is a serial killer. That premise is all well and good, but it’s also pretty much the last thing that The Last Heist has to offer.

The plot here is as mentioned before. The Last Heist is a movie about a group of robbers who try to rob a closing safety deposit box center, but soon encounter a brutal serial killer. It’s a fun idea, »

- Movie Geeks

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Dark Passage

27 May 2016 10:30 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Bogie's back and Bacall's got him! Or, at least she's got his voice, and a bundle of bandages. A David Goodis hardboiled crime tale becomes an absurd pile of coincidences and accidental relationships, all wrapped up (literally) in a giant plastic-surgery gimmick. Bogart and his new bride Bacall are charming, but there's a show -stealer at large: the great Agnes Moorehead plays the most entertainingly horrible harpy in film history. Dark Passage Blu-ray Warner Archive Collection 1947 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 106 min. / Street Date May 17, 2016 / available through the WBshop / 16.59 Starring Humphrey Bogart, Lauren Bacall, Agnes Moorehead, Bruce Bennett, Tom D'Andrea, Clifton Young, Douglas Kennedy, Rory Mallinson, Houseley Stevenson Cinematography Sid Hickox Art Direction Charles H. Clarke Film Editor David Weisbart Original Music Franz Waxman Written by Delmer Daves from a novel by David Goodis Produced by Jerry Wald, Jack L. Warner Directed by Delmer Daves

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Dark Passage »

- Glenn Erickson

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Andrew Dominik’s 10 Favorite Films

27 May 2016 11:40 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Across his three features this century, Andrew Dominik has explored masculine ideals (and the lack thereof) with an uncompromising vision. While earning the most acclaim for his stunning western The Assassination of Jesse James By the Coward Robert Ford, his follow-up Killing Them Softly is also distinctive in its laser-focused fury, getting the impressive distinction of an “F” CinemaScore to cement it as something truly special. His long-gestating next feature, Blonde, is hopefully still happening (the last we heard, Netflix may back it and shooting could begin as early as this year), but as we wait for confirmation, today we’re looking at his favorite films of all-time.

Courtesy of his Sight & Sound ballot, it’s a primarily American-focused line-up with classics from Francis Ford Coppola, Martin Scorsese, Billy Wilder, and David Lynch (x2). Perhaps most interesting is his favorite Alfred Hitchcock film, one of the man’s last five features: Marnie, »

- Jordan Raup

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Watch: Celebrate the Greatest Cinematography of All-Time With New Video Essay

28 April 2016 12:40 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

If beauty is in the eye of the beholder, then there will never be a definitive list of the greatest cinematography, but for our money, one of the finest polls has been recently conducted on the matter. Our friend Scout Tafoya polled over 60 critics on Fandor, including some of us here, and the results can be found in a fantastic video essay below. Rather than the various wordless supercuts that crowd Vimeo, Tafoya wrestles with his thoughts on cinematography as we see the beautiful images overlaid from the top 12 choices.

“I’ve been thinking of the world cinematographically since high school,” Scout says. “Sometime around tenth grade I started looking out windows, at crowds of my peers, at the girls I had crushes on, and imagining the best way to film them. Lowlight, mini-dv or 35mm? Curious and washed out like the way Emmanuel Lubezki shot Y Tu Mamá También, »

- Jordan Raup

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Daily | Goings On | Fassbinder, Hu, Ospina

22 April 2016 11:36 AM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

The Metrograph is screening all ten of Rainer Werner Fassbinder's favorite films: Nicholas Ray's Johnny Guitar, Howard Hawks's Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, Charles Laughton's The Night of the Hunter, Vasily Shukshin's The Red Snowball Tree, Josef von Sternberg's Dishonored, Max Ophuls's Lola Montes, Michael Curtiz's Flamingo Road, Pier Paolo Pasolini's Salò, or The 120 Days of Sodom, Raoul Walsh's The Naked and the Dead and Luchino Visconti's The Damned. Also in New York: King Hu’s A Touch of Zen and work by Luis Ospina. Screening tonight in Chicago: Nathan Silver's Riot, Mike Ott's Lancaster, CA and William Greaves's In the Company of Men. And we have a few more goings on. » - David Hudson »

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NYC Weekend Watch: Fassbinder Favorites, Buñuel, Queer Cinema, King Hu & More

22 April 2016 8:59 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Since any New York cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Metrograph

You’ve read of Rainer Werner Fassbinder‘s ten favorite films — now you can see them. The German titan’s beloved titles are celebrated in a new series: Johnny Guitar screens this Friday; Saturday offers Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, The Night of the Hunter, and the rarely seen The Red Snowball Tree; on Sunday, one can »

- Nick Newman

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SXSW Film Review: ‘My Father Die’

15 March 2016 11:52 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The swamp-thing progeny of “Beasts of the Southern Wild” and “The Night of the Hunter” (with a little “Cape Fear” thrown in), “My Father Die” offers blood-and-thunder Southern-gothic excess both tempered and heightened by vivid directorial texturing. Writer-helmer Sean Brosnan’s debut feature after several shorts isn’t exactly a horror film, but this thematically simple, aesthetically complex revenge tale will find strongest initial support among fans at genre fests, with word of mouth there possibly spurring niche theatrical pickups as well as more assured home-format sales.

A black-and-white opening sequence finds the dirt-poor Rawlings brothers running wild in Louisiana bayou country, where the teenage Chester (Chester Rushing) promises to initiate the pubescent Asher in the mysteries of sex via willing young neighbor Nana (Trina Lafargue). Unfortunately, their dad, Ivan (former British pro boxer Gary Stretch), considers her his own property — never mind that he’s still married to the »

- Dennis Harvey

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Andrzej Żuławski: A Little Larger Than the Entire Universe

13 March 2016 6:27 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Andrzej Żuławski. Photo by Isabelle Vautier.How does one translate into film the books by Witold Gombrowicz, who ranks among the greatest modernists of the 20th century? Few have actually dared. Whereas Peter Lilienthal’s adaptation for television of Pornografia (Die Sonne angreifen, 1971) has been all but consigned to oblivion, the famed Polish director Jerzy Skolimowski went on a 17-year hiatus following his failed adaptation of Ferdydurke (30 Door Key, 1991). However, the opposite holds true for Andrzej Żuławski, who came out of a 15-year pause to adapt for the screen Gombrowicz’s fourth novel Cosmos (1965), also his last and most complex. Unfortunately, it became a farewell work for Żuławski as well. What kind of cosmos is it? First and foremost, it’s the bizarre microcosm of a boarding house where the young writer Witold (Jonathan Genet) arrives with his friend Fuchs (Johan Libéreau) in tow to finish his novel The Haunted. »

- Boris Nelepo

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Film Review: ‘The Eyes of My Mother’

4 February 2016 9:13 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Serial murder has rarely seemed a more melancholy calling than it does in “The Eyes of My Mother,” a short, decidedly unsweet and wholly startling vision from freshman writer-director Nicolas Pesce. Meshing an especially bloody strain of slasher pic with the most whispery of high-art sensibilities, this tale of a young Portuguese-American woman drawn — by way of misused heritage and scarring personal tragedy — into severely psychotic behavior reps an exquisite waking nightmare, its meticulous monochrome imagery caressing the eye even as the filmmaker brandishes a scalpel before it. A characteristically cold cut from the ever-exciting Borderline Films, this standout from Sundance’s Next program may, with its stretches of silent storytelling and fado-laced soundtrack, be a tad too lyrical for hard-horror fans, but a devoted cult audience awaits an adventurous distributor.

“Never go in the barn,” a woman solemnly warns her child midway through the film. It’s a line »

- Guy Lodge

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No one can agree on the top 5 greatest Coen Brothers films

4 February 2016 9:00 AM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

As we began talking about editorial content we could publish to celebrate the release of Hail, Caesar!, the latest film from Joel and Ethan Coen, we realized that none of us had the same top five lists, and that it seems unusual for that to be the case. The Coens have had such a rich and varied career that it is impossible to pin them down to one style or one theme or one type of storytelling. Some people love their comedies. Some people love it when they get dark. Some people love the underdogs, the least-liked of their films. But what's clear is that every film they've made has its fans, and even their worst films are beloved by someone. There are few artists like the Coen Brothers, and we were delighted to get lists from each of our special guest contributors this time. The diversity of the replies »

- HitFix Staff

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Flicker Alley Announces Two New Film Noir Releases Coming in April

21 January 2016 11:32 PM, PST | CriterionCast | See recent CriterionCast news »

The fine folks at Flicker Alley have just announced two new Blu-rays coming in April 2016:

Flicker Alley, the Film Noir Foundation, and UCLA Film & Television Archive are proud to present two rediscovered gems of film noir, Too Late for Tears and Woman on the Run, both brilliantly restored in brand-new Blu-ray/DVD dual-format editions.

Here is a preview of Noir City, included in the supplements.

Here is the press release they’ve sent out:

Flicker Alley, the Film Noir Foundation, and UCLA Film & Television Archive are proud to present two rediscovered gems of film noir, Too Late for Tears and Woman on the Run, both brilliantly restored in brand-new Blu-ray/DVD dual-format editions.

Too Late For Tears

Finally! One of the great missing films of the classic noir era-resurrected! Rescued and preserved after a five-year crusade by the Film Noir Foundation, this 1949 classic is at long last available in a clean digital version, »

- Ryan Gallagher

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Metrograph, New York City’s Newest Indie Theater, Unveils Impressive First Slate of Programming

20 January 2016 8:54 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Each weekend we highlight the best repertory programming that New York City has to offer, and it’s about to get even better. Opening on February 19th at 7 Ludlow Street on the Lower East Side is Metrograph, the city’s newest indie movie theater. Sporting two screens, they’ve announced their first slate, which includes retrospectives for Fassbinder, Wiseman, Eustache, and more, special programs such as an ode to the moviegoing experience, and new independent features that we’ve admired on the festival circuit (including Afternoon, Office 3D, and Measure of a Man).

Artistic and Programming Director Jacob Perlin says in a press release, “Jean Eustache in a Rocky t-shirt. This is the image we had in mind while making this first calendar. Great cinema is there, wherever you can find it. The dismissed film now recognized as a classic, the forgotten box-office hit newly resurrected, the high and the low, »

- Jordan Raup

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2006

16 items from 2016


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