6.9/10
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The Man Who Loved Redheads (1955)

The honourable Mark St. Neots is playing with some 'chums' when he meets and is bowled over by Sylvia. As he grows older he retains his image of this beautiful young girl with the red hair.... See full summary »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
Sylvia / Daphne / Olga / Colette
...
Mark St. Neots, Lord Binfield
Roland Culver ...
Major Oscar Philipson
...
Caroline, Lady Binfield
...
Denis
...
Williams
Patricia Cutts ...
Bubbles
...
Ethel
John Hart ...
Sergei
...
Chloe
...
Young Mark
...
Sidney
...
Narrator (voice)
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Storyline

The honourable Mark St. Neots is playing with some 'chums' when he meets and is bowled over by Sylvia. As he grows older he retains his image of this beautiful young girl with the red hair. Through a chance meeting, he can pursue his career in the diplomatic corps as well as the young ladies he meets. A charming comedy with a sting in the tail. Written by Steve Crook <steve@brainstorm.co.uk>

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show | son | party | opening night | model | See All (42) »

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The utterly mad story of an utterly wonderful obsession!

Genres:

Comedy | Music | Romance

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Release Date:

7 February 1955 (UK)  »

Also Known As:

Der Mann, der Rothaarige liebte  »

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(Eastmancolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Crazy Credits

John Hart dances the part of Sergei in the Sleeping Beauty extracts and appears by permission of the Covent Garden Trust. See more »

Soundtracks

The Sleeping Beauty
Written by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky
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User Reviews

 
Very dated and mediocre
25 August 2014 | by (United Kingdom) – See all my reviews

This is a film based upon Terence Rattigan's play WHO IS SYLVIA, which in turn takes its title from both the original poem by William Shakespeare and its setting to music as a song by Schubert (a song with which my grandfather, a baritone, won much admiration). Rattigan also wrote the screenplay. This is definitely not one of Rattigan's happier moments. The film is ridiculously dated and corny, bordering on a travesty. The story is a simple one: the 'hero' played by John Justin fell in love at first sight at the age of 14 with a girl named Sylvia who had red hair and blue eyes, but he then lost contact with her. For the rest of his life he cheated on his wife and had a mews house in London for trysts with a succession of redheads who reminded him of Sylvia. Pretty silly, really. Harry Andrews plays a butler, Roland Culver has a jolly time playing a pal of Justin's who does the same sort of thing, though not with redheads, Denholm Elliott plays an earnest young son of the older Justin, and Kenneth More does a lively job of satirical narration (we do not see him). Gladys Cooper comes in towards the end with her usual assured style. It is Moira Shearer, seven years on from THE RED SHOES (1948), who plays all the redheads in succession, culminating in one who is a Russian ballet dancer named Olga. As Olga, we watch a great deal of Shearer dancing SLEEPING BEAUTY. Indeed, so much does the camera dwell on Shearer as a dancer, that one nearly forgets the film entirely. (By the way, the set and costume designs for that ballet production are simply appalling, quite a disaster.) This was the last feature film directed by Harold French, who by the way lived to be 100 and died in 1997. He made the excellent UNPUBLISHED STORY thirteen years earlier (1942, see my review). It is a pity that this film is based entirely upon wholly obsolete social codes of a bygone era, that its comedy is tepid, and that it is just not very good.


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