IMDb > Lola Montès (1955)
Lola Montès
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Lola Montès (1955) More at IMDbPro »

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Lola Montès -- Trailer for the Criterion Collection release
Lola Montès -- Lola Montès is a visually ravishing, narratively daring dramatization of the life of the notorious courtesan and showgirl, played by Martine Carol.

Overview

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Director:
Writers:
Cécil Saint-Laurent (based on the novel by: "La vie extraordinaire de Lola Montès")
Max Ophüls (scenario)
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for Lola Montès on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
23 December 1955 (France) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
The frank and shocking story of the world's most famous woman of scandal! See more »
Plot:
The film tells the tragic story of Lola Montès, a great adventurer who becomes the main attraction of... See more » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
NewsDesk:
(26 articles)
User Reviews:
Glossy 50's facade with a Philospher's Heart See more (26 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)
Martine Carol ... Lola Montes

Peter Ustinov ... Circus Master
Anton Walbrook ... Ludwig I, King of Bavaria
Henri Guisol ... Horseman Maurice
Lise Delamare ... Mrs. Craigie, Lola's mother
Paulette Dubost ... Josephine, The maid

Oskar Werner ... Student
Jean Galland ... Private Secretary
Will Quadflieg ... Franz Liszt
Héléna Manson ... Lieutenant James' Sister (as Helena Manson)
Germaine Delbat ... Stewardess
Carl Esmond ... Doctor (as Willy Eichberger)
Jacques Fayet ... Steward
Friedrich Domin ... Circus Manager
Werner Finck ... Wisböck, The artist
Ivan Desny ... Lieutenant Thomas James
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Béatrice Arnac ... Circus Rider (uncredited)
Maurice Barnay ... (uncredited)
Charles Bayard ... Man in the box (uncredited)
Ady Berber ... Bulgakov (uncredited)
Jacqueline Canterelle ... Friend of conductor (uncredited)
Alain Clairfond ... Young man (uncredited)
Yvonne Dany ... (uncredited)
Eddy Debray ... Captain (uncredited)
Roger Dutoit ... Seaman (uncredited)
Jeanine Fabre ... Girl (uncredited)
Jean Filliez ... (uncredited)
Aimée Fontenay ... (uncredited)
Otto Friebel ... Secretary (uncredited)
Anton Färber ... Lola's footman (uncredited)
Margarete Haagen ... Anna (uncredited)
Harry-Max ... Man in the box (uncredited)
Heinrich Hauser ... Lola's footman (uncredited)
Hélène Iawkoff ... (uncredited)
Walter Kiaulehn ... Theatre Manager (uncredited)
Alfons Kiechle ... Inn-keeper (uncredited)
Daniel Mendaille ... Captain (uncredited)
Bob Morel ... Man in the box (uncredited)
Bernard Musson ... (uncredited)
Marcel Ophüls ... (uncredited)
Léon Pauléon ... Passenger (uncredited)
Billy Phillipsen ... (uncredited)
Claude Pinoteau ... Conductor Claudio Pirotto (uncredited)
Suzanne Pinoteau ... Maid (uncredited)
Philippe Richard ... Colonel (uncredited)
Yves Rozec ... Aerealist (uncredited)
Willy Rösner ... Prime minister (uncredited)
Hans Schwarz Jr. ... Wrestler (uncredited)
Leo Siedler ... Mittenhöfer (uncredited)
Victor Tabournot ... Man in the box (uncredited)
Maguy Vernadet ... Maid (uncredited)
Victor Vina ... Man in the box (uncredited)
Alexander von Malachowsky ... Lola's footman (uncredited)
Elinor von Wallerstein ... Queen (uncredited)
Gustav Waldau ... Trainer Jeppner (uncredited)
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Directed by
Max Ophüls  (as Max Ophuls)
 
Writing credits
Cécil Saint-Laurent (based on the novel by: "La vie extraordinaire de Lola Montès") (as Cécil Saint Laurent)

Max Ophüls (scenario) (as Max Ophuls)

Annette Wademant (adaptation) &
Max Ophüls (adaptation) (as Max Ophuls)

Jacques Natanson (dialogue)

Franz Geiger  dialogue: German version (uncredited)
Peter Ustinov  dialogue: English version (uncredited)

Produced by
Albert Caraco .... producer
André Haguet .... producer (uncredited)
Anton Schelkopf .... producer (uncredited)
 
Original Music by
Georges Auric 
 
Cinematography by
Christian Matras 
 
Film Editing by
Madeleine Gug (French version)
Jacqueline Sadoul (uncredited)
Adolf Schlyssleder (uncredited)
 
Production Design by
Jean d'Eaubonne  (as Jean D'Eaubonne)
 
Set Decoration by
Robert Christidès 
 
Costume Design by
Georges Annenkov 
 
Makeup Department
Jean Lalaurette .... hair stylist
Maguy Vernadet .... makeup artist
Jules Chanteau .... hair stylist (uncredited)
Georg Jauss .... makeup artist (uncredited)
Charlotte Müller .... makeup artist (uncredited)
Jonas Müller .... makeup artist (uncredited)
 
Production Management
Ralph Baum .... production manager
Karlheinz Först .... production manager (uncredited)
Georg Markl .... production manager (uncredited)
Paule Pastier .... production manager (uncredited)
Helmut Ringelmann .... production manager (uncredited)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Tony Aboyantz .... assistant director
Marcel Ophüls .... assistant director (as Marcel Wall)
Ulrich Picard .... assistant director (as Ulrich Pickardt)
Claude Pinoteau .... assistant director
Alain Jessua .... trainee assistant director (uncredited)
Adolf Schlyssleder .... assistant director (uncredited)
 
Art Department
Pierre Duquesne .... assistant set decorator (as P. Duquesne)
Jacques Gut .... assistant designer
Jacques Gut .... assistant set decorator (as J. Gut)
Willy Schatz .... assistant production designer
Werner Wappler .... props (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Hans Endrulat .... sound engineer (as H. Endrulat)
Jean Nény .... sound engineer (as J. Neny)
Antoine Petitjean .... sound engineer (as A. Petitjean)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Ernest Bourreaud .... assistant camera (as E. Bourreaud)
Alain Douarinou .... camera operator
Luc Mirot .... assistant camera (as L. Mirot)
Raymond Voinquel .... still photographer
Henri Champion .... assistant camera (uncredited)
Ferdinand Rotzinger .... still photographer (uncredited)
Karl-Heinz Vogelmann .... still photographer (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Felicitas Bergmann .... costume supervisor
Marcel Escoffier .... costumes: Martine Carol
Marie Gromtseff .... costume execution (as Gromtseff)
Barbara Karinska .... costume execution (as Karinska)
Ursula Maes .... costume supervisor
Madeleine Rabusson .... costumer (as M. Rabusson)
Jean Zay .... costumer (as J. Zay)
Suzanne Pinoteau .... wardrobe: Martine Carol (uncredited)
Monique Plotin .... assistant costume designer (uncredited)
Monique Plotin .... costumer (uncredited)
Madeleine Rabusson .... assistant costume designer (uncredited)
Jean Zay .... assistant costume designer (uncredited)
 
Editorial Department
Etiennette Muse .... assistant editor (French version)
Hannes Nikel .... assistant editor (German version) (uncredited)
Rosa Ring .... assistant editor (German version) (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Jacques Métehen .... musical director
 
Other crew
Tony Aboyantz .... production assistant
Aimée Fontenay .... trapeze number
André Hoss .... general manager
Lucie Lichtig .... script girl
Martina Müller .... reconstruction (German premiere version)
Helge Pawlinin .... choreographer
Roger Peré .... administrative director
Peter S. Petrona .... technical advisor: circus
Yves Rozec .... trapeze number
Richard Balducci .... publicist (uncredited)
Eva Ebner .... script girl (uncredited)
Claude Vernier .... dialogue coach: Martine Carol (uncredited)
 
Crew believed to be complete


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Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
116 min
Language:
Color:
Color (Eastmancolor)
Aspect Ratio:
2.55 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Dolby (Restored version) | 4-Track Stereo (Western Electric Sound System)
Certification:
Australia:PG | Australia:M (original rating) | Finland:S | Germany:12 (DVD rating) | Portugal:M/12 (Qualidade) | Singapore:PG | Sweden:15 | UK:PG (2000 video) | USA:Not Rated | West Germany:12
Filming Locations:
Company:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Max Ophüls' final film, and his only film in color.See more »
Goofs:
Anachronisms: When the Circus Master first tries to recruit Lola, he lists San Francisco as an important North American city, and includes Buffalo Bill in a list of major circus figures. This scene is set shortly before Montez left for Bavaria, so it must be late 1845 or early 1846. San Francisco was called Yerba Buena until 1847, and the name Buffalo Bill was first applied in the 1860s to William F. Cody, who was born in 1846.See more »
Movie Connections:
Referenced in Shoot the Piano Player (1960)See more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
12 out of 22 people found the following review useful.
Glossy 50's facade with a Philospher's Heart, 25 October 2006
Author: Kara Dahl Russell from United States

When a movie is hailed as one of the greatest movies of all time, it is hard for it to live up to it, especially when it is the product of the 1950s. A millennium viewer's eye is unkind to this era.

I am one of many who see this film as a clear precursor to Baz Lehrman's MOUIN ROUGE. Lots of spectacle, with a story behind it - sometimes literally behind it, seeping through like a remembered waltz. It should be clear from the circus setting that we are in for a heavily artistic analogy that is jokingly self-referential. This is a story of woman who has not only sold her life story to the rabble, but sold herself as well. Beauty is a commodity with a limited shelf life, and life is to be lived while you're young. The inside joke that this dancer had very little talent, but was world famous, certainly still could be applied to many stars – or – ahem – children of stars who have their own coattail careers.

Many of today's audiences don't see the appeal of Martine Carol, but she is exactly the prototype of the 1950s glossy ideal. Many men don't like all the make-up, but she is undeniably a beauty, and the bust to waist ratio is still the kind that makes men stop and stare… the 1950s word was "stacked." Far from being wooden, she is playing a beauty trapped by her looks. The acting style is an older, more presentational style, but that was still being done in the states in many films at this time, too. Given that the context here is a circus performance, and that a lot is physically being required of Ms. Carol, she deserves more grace from modern audiences..

Ustinov makes the most of his stage presence in this role, and overall, this film gives us a wonderful interplay between the layers of being on-stage, backstage, asides and aborted conversations, and the interplay of memories with what is currently happening. It is a confectionery layer cake that is rarely attempted on film. When you notice that a hard boiled clown is running the show without a care whether his performers die, this clearly is not a story to be viewed only for its surface.

Meanwhile, the surface is early Technicolor lovely, brisk and bright with tremendously artistic imagery, and sweeping music. The bedroom scene with Lizst and Lola shot through a wrought iron frame, surrounded by red curtains… these are film images that live in the mind, that can not be denied. The subtle echos between the Circus sets and the "real" sets are both silly and smart – the latter often being obviously fake sets as well. This is part of the layered reality. The art design echos elements of the silent film "Les Enfants du Paradis." This would have been more obvious to film fans in France in 1955.

This film has been called subtle, it could also be called unclear, even nihilistic. This philosophy was certainly in vogue in '50s Europe. We are left to ponder if all gilded cages are still just cages, and if any road leads to a happy ending. More than anything, it is the closing of this film that makes LOLA greater than the sum of its parts, and makes you sit back and think.

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