5.3/10
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8 user 1 critic

How to Be Very, Very Popular (1955)

Approved | | Comedy | 6 January 1956 (Belgium)
2 girls on the lam hide out in a college fraternity.

Director:

Writers:

(novel), | 3 more credits »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Stormy Tornado
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Curly Flagg
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Fillmore 'Wedge' Wedgewood
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Dr. Tweed
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Eddie Jones
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Toby Marshall
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B.J. Marshall
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Midge
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Miss 'Syl' Sylvester
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Cedric Flagg
Andrew Tombes ...
Police Sgt. Moon
Noel Toy ...
Cherry Blossom Wang
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Chief of Police
Harry Carter ...
Bus Driver
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Music Teacher
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Storyline

Song-and-dance girls Curly and Stormy Tornado hide out with the guys at Bristol College when they know they can identify the killer of a fellow performer at their San Francisco cabaret. But they rather stand out in their stage costumes and soon all sorts of trouble is heading their way. The fact that Curly has been hypnotised doesn't help. Written by Jeremy Perkins {J-26}

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Comedy

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

6 January 1956 (Belgium)  »

Also Known As:

Como Usar as Curvas  »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Recording)

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

2.55 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Final film of Betty Grable. NOTE: Her first screen appearance in Let's Go Places (1930) had been released less than a month after Betty had turned 13 years old. This film marked the end of her 25-year movie career, although she did make a few appearances on television after this. See more »

Quotes

Stormy: Hey Curly!
Wedgewood: Not so loud... do you wanna get me expelled? Curly...
Curly: Yeah?
Wedgewood: Do you think you can get in here without being seen?
Curly: For what purpose?
Stormy: Don't argue the man's got a fried chicken in here.
Curly: Hold him.
See more »

Connections

Referenced in What's My Line?: Episode dated 10 July 1955 (1955) See more »

Soundtracks

The Bristol Bell Song
Music by Lionel Newman
Lyrics by Ken Darby
Sung by the girls before commencement
Also sung on the bus at the end
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User Reviews

An Undiscovered Masterpiece? No, but not as bad as you think...

"How to Be Very, Very Popular" was anything but upon its release, and has not gained any stature since. In fact, its reputation has actually grown worse. It's infamous as the picture that Marilyn Monroe refused to do, leading to her celebrated walk-out on Fox. Sheree North, a practically unknown dancer-starlet, was quickly put into the role, coiffed and made up to look almost exactly like MM. The film, needless to say, bombed, and Sheree--strong armed into being a virtual Monroe clone--bore the brunt of most of it. Betty Grable (MM's co-star from "How to Marry a Millionaire") took advantage of the film's lack of success and used it as her chance to retire from the grind. In retrospect, the film really isn't all that bad--although it's obvious why Monroe balked at playing the North role; it's little more than window-dressing. Actually, had North been given the role from the get-go, and not encouraged to look and sound EXACTLY like a carbon copy MM, the picture might've been pulled off as a cute, harmless little comedy. The film was clearly a step down for a superstar of Monroe's stature, but could've been a nice, showy stepping stone for a rising starlet. Grable is her usual warm, bright self, but she's getting a bit old to be playing scantily-clad chorines. Next to the very young North, especially, she looks decidedly matronly. North isn't given much to work with (again, it's hard to comment on a performance which was basically conceived as a blurred copy of an original), but she does get to do a splendid, wild, rock and roll dance to "Shake, Rattle & Roll." Sadly, the film's complete failure relegated the promising North to the back burner; and she had much more musical and dramatic talent than Jayne Mansfield, whom Fox began to build up instead. So, if "How to Be Very, Very Popular" should show up on television one afternoon, sit back and enjoy it. It may not be great cinema, but it's an underrated little slice of mindless entertainment.


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