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Godzilla Raids Again (1955) Poster

Trivia

Special effects director Eiji Tsuburaya wanted the fight scenes filmed in slow motion, but a camera technician accidentally undercranked the camera instead of overcranking it, resulting in the action appearing faster than reality. Tsuburaya liked the effect, and decided to use it in the film.
The Godzilla prop used in the shot when the planes fly over him in the ice mountains was actually a wind-up toy. It was originally supposed to be walking in the shot, but it looked so unrealistic that the finished movie has it simply standing still. Either way, it is still one of the most infamously awkward effect shots of the film.
The only Godzilla movie where Godzilla's spines do not glow before he releases his radioactive flame.
Many times during the American dubbed version, Godzilla uses Anguirus' trademark roar more often than he uses his own.
There have been two different stories as to why Godzilla's name was changed to "Gigantis" in the American version:
  • Warner Brothers could not get permission to use Godzilla from Joseph E. Levine and had to change the name to "Gigantis".


  • In an interview, Paul Schreibman, the producer of the American version, said that he changed Godzilla's name to "Gigantis" to give the audience the impression that they were seeing a new monster. He has since regretted that decision.


This suit used in this movie was very similar to the first one in Godzilla (1954). It was slimmed down to fit Haruo Nakajima better and to make the acting process a little more comfortable. It would also allow him to make more violent moves while shooting battle scenes. In addition, the irises were much bigger than the original suit, which was a smaller, and had the "beady" look; the dorsal fins were kept about the same size and shape as the original; and there were still four toes on each foot and the little ears were still behind his eyes. This overall appearance still gave Godzilla a look of terror and menace to mankind.
George Takei's first film project.
This is the first film in which Godzilla fights another monster.
Godzilla (1954) became such a huge hit that Toho produced this sequel and got it into theaters, despite the numerous special effects scenes required, in less than six months after the original film was released.
George Takei, better known as Lt. Hikaru Sulu in Star Trek (1966), was one of the many voice actors employed for this film. The only other Kaiju film he performed voice work for was in the Americanized version of Rodan (1956).
This was the series debuts for both Hiroshi Koizumi and Yoshio Tsuchiya. Koizumi would appear in four Showa Era films as well as one each in both the Heisei and Millennium eras while Tsuchiya would appear in four Showa films and one in the Heisei era.
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Early in the film during the Osaka night club scenes, stock footage of a stage performance from World War II is used. On the left side of the screen you will see the Japanese red sun banner and next to it is a swastika banner. Some versions of the film have the swastika blurred out with a gray circle.
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For the U.S. English dubbed version released as "Gigantis, the Fire Monster" (1959), the voices dubbing the male characters mispronounce the name "Tsukioka." The voices dubbing the female characters pronounce it properly.
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Was going to be remade in the US as "The Volcano Monsters". It followed a similar plot line where a Tyrannosaurus and an Ankylosaurus are found battling and are captured then brought to San Francisco where they awake and do battle. Unfortunately the rights could not be obtained and the movie was never made. However, many of the elements from that script written by Ib Melchior would later be used in the film Reptilicus (1961).
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This film was released in the United States in May of 1959 by Warner Brothers under the title "Gigantis, the Fire Monster. It would be 55 years before Warner Brothers would release another Godzilla film, Godzilla (2014) in May of 2014.
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Mr. Yamaji, the head of the Kaiyu Csannery, was played by an obscure actor credited as "Yukio Kasama." With his hat and glasses he bore an uncanny resemblance to Director of Special Techniques (special effects) Eiji Tsuburaya. Whether or not this was actually a cameo appearance by Tsuburaya remains unconfirmed.
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Despite the large number of well executed special effects and explosions, the U.S. theatrical trailer did not contain any scenes from the film. The trailer was made up of still images with graphics and narration and ran only approximately 45 seconds.
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When Gigantis and Angurus fall off Iwato and crash into the sea, Haruo Nakajima and Katsumi Tezuka are actually inside the suits. Crew members were positioned outside the frame to pulled them to the surface when the take was completed.
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The book on dinosaurs that the scientist uses to brief the authorities on Anguirus is actually titled "The Dinosaur Book", by Edwin Colbert. According to the dialogue, the scientist is reading of the terrible, carnivorous "angilosaurus", but in reality, the page is describing "strictly herbivorous" iguanodonts.
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Instead of using Masaru Satô's original score, Warner substituted themes from Kronos (1957) and The Deerslayer (1957).
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When the company developing "The Volcano Monsters" went out of business, the rights were finally acquired by Los Angeles entertainment attorney Paul Schreibman. Schreibman, arranged to have the film edited and dubbed for release under the title "Gigantis the Fire Monster" (1959). Schreibman also had the rights to the ultra low budget Teenagers from Outer Space (1959). He was able to negotiate a deal with Warner Brothers to release the pair as a pre-packaged double feature.
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When the U.S. release was being developed as "The Volcano Monsters," Toho shipped the Gigantis (Godzilla) and Angurus suits to the Howard A. Anderson Company who would be shooting the additional special effects inserts. When the partnership producing the project broke up, and the project was canceled, the suits were presumably shipped back to Toho.
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Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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